CategoryNewsletters

Iowa Dems project 14 national delegates for Buttigieg, 12 for Sanders

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 10, 2020: With 100% of precincts reporting, the Iowa Democratic Party projected the national delegate counts for each candidate. Seven Democratic presidential candidates debated Friday night in Manchester, New Hampshire. blank    blankblank   


Since 1976, how many presidential candidates have won the New Hampshire primary and their party’s nomination after losing the Iowa caucuses?

Notable Quote of the Day

“Bernie Sanders was battered in Iowa with more than $800,000 in TV attack ads that labeled him a socialist and argued he couldn’t beat President Trump.

Here in New Hampshire, the opposite has happened: The airwaves are free of anti-Sanders spots in the days before the first-in-the-nation-primary, and he’s watching the moderates shank each other.”

– Holly Otterbein and Stephanie Murray, Politico

Debate Night

Seven Democratic presidential candidates debated Friday night in Manchester, New Hampshire: Joe BidenPete ButtigiegAmy KlobucharBernie SandersTom SteyerElizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang.

The candidates discussed electability, healthcare, impeachment, foreign policy, drug policy, gun policy, the Supreme Court, race, and climate change. Sanders had the most speaking time at 20.1 minutes. Yang spoke the least at 8.1 minutes.

For highlights from the debate for each candidate, click here.

Iowa Caucus Results

With 100% of precincts reporting, the Iowa Democratic Party projected Pete Buttigieg will win 14 national delegates, Bernie Sanders 12, Elizabeth Warren 8, Joe Biden 6, and  Amy Klobuchar 1.

The Sanders campaign announced on Sunday that it would request a partial recanvass of the caucus results before the extended deadline on Monday.

Democrats

  • Michael Bennet is holding town halls in New London and Manchester, New Hampshire, on Monday.

  • Joe Biden released a digital ad on Saturday comparing his and Pete Buttigieg’s political experience. He is holding a GOTV event in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Monday.

  • Rep. Haley Stevens (Mich.) endorsed Michael Bloomberg on Saturday. He is airing two new anti-Trump ads, “Bring Presidential Back” and “Nice Try.” The Bloomberg campaign also opened five field offices in Minnesota, where there are 45 staffers across the state.

  • Pete Buttigieg will campaign at Plymouth State University and hold GOTV rallies in Milford and Exeter, New Hampshire, on Monday.

  • Tulsi Gabbard will campaign in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Monday. She launched a petition on Sunday calling for the resignation of Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez following the Iowa caucus reporting issues.

  • Former Rep. and 2020 presidential candidate Joe Sestak endorsed Amy Klobuchar on Friday. Klobuchar’s campaign reported raising $2 million in less than 24 hours after the New Hampshire debate.

  • Deval Patrick will speak at New England College and the Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence Forum in New Hampshire on Monday.

  • Bernie Sanders is holding events throughout New Hampshire on Monday, including a concert rally with Rep. Alexandria Oscasio-Cortez.

  • Tom Steyer campaigned in South Carolina on Sunday, where he called for increasing the hourly minimum wage to $22.

  • Elizabeth Warren is holding a GOTV event in Rochester and a town hall in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on Monday.

  • Andrew Yang will speak at town halls across New Hampshire on Monday. In the evening, he will hold rallies in Derry and Keene State.

Republicans

Flashback: February 10, 2016

Carly Fiorina and Chris Christie suspended their presidential campaigns after finishing outside of the top five candidates in the New Hampshire Republican primary.blank

Click here to learn more.



Virginia House of Delegates approves bill establishing collective bargaining rights for public-sector workers

On Feb. 6, the Virginia House of Delegates approved HB582, a bill establishing collective bargaining rights for public-sector workers at both the state and local levels. Nationwide, three states – Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina – currently prohibit collective bargaining on the part of public-sector workers.

What specifically does the bill propose? HB582 would make the following changes to the state’s public-sector labor laws:

  • Repeals the current prohibition against collective bargaining by public-sector workers.
  • Establishes the Public Employee Relations Board to designate bargaining units and provide for certification and decertification elections for unions.
  • Requires employers and unions certified as exclusive bargaining representatives “to meet at reasonable times to negotiate in good faith with respect to wages, hours, and other terms and conditions of employment.”
  • Repeals a 2013 law stipulating that, in certification and decertification elections, “the right of an individual employee to vote by secret ballot is a fundamental right that shall be guaranteed from infringement.”

How did the House vote, and what comes next? The House voted 54-45 to approve HB582, with one member not voting. All but one Democrat, Del. Dawn Adams, voted in favor of the bill. All Republicans voted against it.

The bill now goes to the Virginia State Senate, where Democrats hold a 21-19 majority. If the Senate approves the bill, it will then go to Governor Ralph Northam (D) for his action.

What are the reactions?

  • Del. Elizabeth Guzman (D), the bill’s chief sponsor, said, “Workers in every locality in every corner of the commonwealth should have the freedom to collectively bargain. As one of only three states to ban public sector collective bargaining, Virginia is far behind the curve of history. It’s past time to give our teachers, firefighters, and other public service workers a voice so that they can advocate for the communities they serve.”
  • Jim Livingston, president of the Virginia Education Association (an affiliate of the National Education Association), said, “Students benefit when teachers and other school professionals have a voice to advocate for students and public schools. In other states with collective bargaining, educators and school districts have negotiated agreements that lowered class sizes, provided for extra resources for students, and addressed school health and safety issues. Collective bargaining is good for students, good for educators, good for schools, and good for Virginia communities.”
  • Mark Mix, president of the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, opposed the bill, saying, “Under such a monopoly bargaining regime, individual workers are prohibited from even discussing basic workplace issues with their employer without triggering an unfair labor practice claim. And if that weren’t already bad enough, the bill would give union agents free reign to impose forced representation on workers through the coercive and abuse-prone ‘card check’ process where union organizers can bully or mislead workers into signing cards that are then used as ‘votes’ for unionization.”
  • Jacob Huebert, an attorney for the plaintiff in Janus v. AFSCME, said provisions of the bill would conflict with Janus: “The bill would give unions the exclusive responsibility to receive and maintain authorizations for union dues deductions from employees’ paychecks as well as employees’ requests to cancel or change their dues authorizations. … That is insufficient to comply with Janus’s affirmative consent requirement.”

What we’ve been reading

The big picture

Number of relevant bills by state

We are currently tracking 79 pieces of legislation dealing with public-sector employee union policy. On the map below, a darker shade of green indicates a greater number of relevant bills. Click here for a complete list of all the bills we’re tracking.

Union Station map February 7, 2020.png

Number of relevant bills by current legislative status

Union Station status chart February 7, 2020.png

Number of relevant bills by partisan status of sponsor(s)

Union Station partisan chart February 7, 2020.png

Recent legislative actions

Below is a complete list of relevant legislative actions taken since our last issue. Bills are listed in alphabetical order, first by state then by bill number.

  • Kansas SB361: This bill would permit public employees to rescind dues deduction authorizations at any time.
    • Introduced Feb. 4 and referred to Senate Commerce Committee Feb. 6.
    • Sponsored by Senate Assessment and Taxation Committee.
  • Maine LD900: This bill authorizes certain classes of public-sector employees to strike.
    • Hearing scheduled Feb. 5.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Maryland HB163: This bill would prohibit employers from requiring employees to join, remain members of, or pay dues to a union as a condition of employment.
    • Hearing scheduled Feb. 4.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • Maryland SB658: This bill would grant collective bargaining rights to graduate assistants in the University of Maryland system, Morgan State University, and St. Mary’s College.
    • Introduced Feb. 3 and referred to Senate Finance Committee Feb. 4.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Missouri HB2341: This bill would require public employees to provide annual written or electronic authorization for payroll deductions of union dues.
    • Second reading Feb. 3.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • New Hampshire HB1290: This bill would require the state public employee labor relations board to permit employees to vote by mail in certification elections.
    • House Labor, Industrial, and Rehabilitative Services Committee executive sessions scheduled Feb. 5.
    • Bipartisan sponsors.
  • New Hampshire HB1399: This bill would allow a bargaining unit to request certification of its union/representative.
    • House Labor, Industrial, and Rehabilitative Services Committee executive sessions scheduled Feb. 5.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • New Hampshire HB1554: This bill would provide for changes to public employee voting in certification elections.
    • House Labor, Industrial, and Rehabilitative Services Committee executive sessions scheduled Feb. 5.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • New Jersey S1202: This bill would require public employers to grant either unpaid or paid leave to employees who are elected or appointed as union officers.
    • Introduced and referred to Senate State Government, Wagering, Tourism, and Historic Preservation Committee Feb. 3.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • New Mexico SB110: This bill would make various amendments to the state’s public-sector labor relations laws.
    • Reported favorably by Senate Public Affairs Committee Feb. 3.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Oklahoma SB1480: This bill would authorize school employees to negotiate independently with their employers.
    • Introduced Feb. 3.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • Oklahoma SB1716: This bill would require elections to certify school employee unions.
    • Introduced Feb. 3.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • Oklahoma SB1724: This bill would require written authorization for school employees to deduct union dues and political contributions from their paychecks.
    • Introduced Feb. 3.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • Virginia HB582: This bill would repeal the existing prohibition against collective bargaining by public employees.
    • House approved Feb. 6.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Virginia SB1022: This bill would repeal the existing prohibition against collective bargaining by public employees.
    • Senate Commerce and Labor Committee hearing scheduled Feb. 3.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Virginia SB939: This bill would permit local governments to recognize unions as bargaining agents for public-sector workers.
    • Senate Finance and Appropriations Committee hearing scheduled Feb. 6.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Washington HB2017: This bill would establish collective bargaining rights for administrative law judges.
    • Referred to House Rules Committee Feb. 4.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Washington SB6224: This bill would establish collective bargaining rights for administrative law judges.
    • Senate Ways and Means Committee hearing scheduled Feb. 3.
    • Democratic sponsors.


Trump acquitted of abuse of power, obstruction of Congress

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 6, 2020: Donald Trump was acquitted by the U.S. Senate of two charges. Bernie Sanders raised $25 million in January.        

Notable Quote of the Day

“Here’s the real wakeup call for Democrats, coming out of Iowa: We can’t put our heads in the sand and ignore the middling turnout, in a time of bonafide historic upheaval.

If Democrats don’t put together an unprecedented get-out-the-vote effort in 2020, far exceeding anything from the past, we are setting ourselves up for failure. “

– Jeff Biggers, Salon

Iowa Caucus Results

The Iowa Democratic Party has released results from 97 percent of precincts. Pete Buttigieg leads Bernie Sanders by 0.1% in state delegate equivalents, while Sanders tops the final raw vote.

Democrats

Republicans

What We’re Reading

Flashback: February 6, 2016

Jeb Bush, Ben Carson, Chris Christie, Ted Cruz, John Kasich, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump debated in New Hampshire.

Click here to learn more.



Partial Iowa returns show Buttigieg, Sanders leading

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 5, 2020: The Iowa Democratic Party released its first results from the caucuses on Tuesday. Tulsi Gabbard is holding a protest in New Hampshire outside of the venue where a series of CNN town halls will be recorded.         

Presidential Facebook ads, 2019-2020 (January 27-February 2, 2020)

Notable Quote of the Day

“Enter the biggest winner of this week. Not Trump, who seems incapable of just leaving a good news cycle well enough alone. And not Joe Biden, even though he got to skip giving a pep talk to sad-faced Iowa campaign workers and declare, ‘On to New Hampshire!’ And certainly not Mayor Pete, who may or may not have won the caucuses Monday night, but will never have the chance to come barreling out of the once-important state with a win under his belt and history in the books.

The real winner this week is former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has been lying in the tall grass of the later states, seeding each with money, TV and staff, waiting for the day Democrats take a look at their options and say, ‘Is this the best we can do?’ That day seems to be coming faster than anyone anticipated.”

– Patricia Murphy, Roll Call

Iowa Caucus Results

The Iowa Democratic Party released its first results from the caucuses in two batches on Tuesday following quality control issues. With 71 percent of precincts reporting, Pete Buttigieg

leads in state delegate equivalents and Bernie Sanders tops the final raw vote.

Democrats

  • Michael BennetAmy KlobucharBernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren will be in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday for the final vote in the impeachment trial.
  • BennetPete ButtigiegKlobucharDeval PatrickAndrew Yang, and Tom Steyer are speaking at the Youth Climate and Clean Energy Town Hall in New Hampshire on Wednesday.
  • Arkansas House Minority Leader Fredrick Love endorsed Joe Biden on Tuesday. Unite the Country, a super PAC backing Biden, announced on Tuesday that it is launching a $900,000 television and digital ad campaign in New Hampshire.
  • Michael Bloomberg began airing a new ad called “The Real State of the Union” on Tuesday ahead of the president’s address. It will run nationally on MSNBC, FOX, CNN, and other platforms. Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo endorsed Bloomberg on Wednesday.
  • Tulsi Gabbard is holding a protest in New Hampshire on Wednesday outside of the venue where a series of eight CNN town halls will be recorded. Gabbard said she did not receive an explanation for why she was not invited to the event.

Republicans

  • In his State of the Union address on Tuesday night, Donald Trump discussed the USMCA trade agreement, economy, Democratic Party, and assasination of Iranian commander Qasem Soleimani.
  • In a series of tweetsJoe Walsh said on Tuesday that he did not believe Trump could be defeated in the Republican primary and that a new political party or movement needed to form for conservatives.
  • Bill Weld will attend the Youth Climate and Clean Energy Town Hall in New Hampshire on Wednesday.

What We’re Reading

Flashback: February 5, 2016

Former NAACP President Ben Jealous endorsed Bernie Sanders.

Click here to learn more.



Democratic Iowa caucus results delayed for quality control checks

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 4, 2020: The Iowa Democratic Party announced that caucus results are delayed due to quality control issues. Donald Trump is delivering the State of the Union address on Tuesday night.        

Presidential poll highlights, 2019-2020 (UMass Lowell • New Hampshire • January 28-31, 2020)

Presidential poll highlights, 2019-2020 (Emerson College • New Hampshire • January 31-February 2, 2020)

Notable Quote of the Day

“This fiasco means the end of the caucuses as a significant American political event. The rest of the country was already losing patience with Iowa anyway and this cooks Iowa’s goose. Frankly, it should. The real winner tonight was Donald Trump, who got to watch his opponents wallow in a mess. A lot of good Democratic candidates and people who fought their hearts out here for…nothing.”

– David Yepsen, The Des Moines Register political reporter

Iowa Caucus Results

The Iowa Democratic Party has not yet released the caucus results. The state party announced the delay was due to quality control issues.

Communications director Mandy McClure said in a statement, “We found inconsistencies in the reporting of three sets of results. In addition to the tech systems being used to tabulate results, we are also using photos of results and a paper trail to validate that all results match and ensure that we have confidence and accuracy in the numbers we report. This is simply a reporting issue, the app did not go down and this is not a hack or an intrusion. The underlying data and paper trail is sound and will simply take time to further report the results.”

The following Republican results were based on 99 percent of precincts reporting. Donald Trump won the caucuses and has been allocated at least 38 of the 40 delegates.

Democrats

Republicans

What We’re Reading

Flashback: February 4, 2016

The Washington Post reported that Ben Carson was cutting more than 50 staff positions.

Click here to learn more.



Heart of the Primaries 2020, Republicans-Issue 4 (February 5, 2020)

This week: Doug Collins enters special Senate election in GA, Feenstra leads IA-04 GOP field in fundraising, and retiring TX Speaker donates to seven incumbents

Click here to follow developments on the Democratic side. Have a tip or see something we missed? Email us at cory@ballotpedia.org. And please share this newsletter with your colleagues!

On the news

Where do Republican and conservative pundits and commentators disagree? Each week, we bring you excerpts that highlight differing views.

“Trump is not making the effort [to visit Iowa] because he is afraid of his two hapless Republican challengers, former Rep. Joe Walsh and former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld. …

Still, Trump has something to prove. Given his success in the 2016 GOP race, it is easy to forget that he started out by losing the Iowa caucuses to Ted Cruz. So he wants to make up for that. But more importantly, he wants to cement Iowans’ support for his reelection. Plus, he wants to take advantage of the increased intensity of support among Republicans who believe Trump has been treated unfairly by Democrats in Washington.”

Byron York, Washington Examiner, Feb. 3, 2020

“[Trump] easily carried [Iowa] during the last general election. His hold on the Senate majority, though marginal, likely faces little to no danger here. He will easily wipe away a small band of little-known candidates mounting primary challenges against the longest of odds to deny him the GOP nomination.

So why was the president of the United States in Des Moines on a Thursday night when he still stands trial for impeachment in Washington? Because Donald Trump had a simple message for the Democrats lining up for a chance to take him on in November: As far as he’s concerned, Iowa belongs to him.

Philip Wegmann, RealClear Politics, Jan. 31, 2020

U.S. Congress

Doug Collins enters special Senate election in GA

U.S. Rep. Doug Collins announced Jan. 29 he is running in the special election for U.S. Senate in Georgia. He joins three other Republicans—including incumbent Sen. Kelly Loeffler—four Democrats, and one independent currently running in the Nov. 3 all-party general election

Sen. Johnny Isakson resigned Dec. 31 for health reasons.

If no candidate receives a majority of the vote, a runoff between the top two will be Jan. 5, 2021.

Several media outlets reported that President Donald Trump wanted Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) to appoint Collins to the Senate seat. Kemp chose Loeffler, a financial executive and co-owner of Atlanta’s WNBA team, to fill the vacancy created when Isakson retired.

Greg Bluestein at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution wrote that Kemp’s choice was part of a strategy to recapture Georgia suburbs following his 1.4-percentage-point victory over Stacey Abrams (D) in 2018. Kemp avoided a runoff in that election with 50.2% of the vote. Bluestein wrote:

Abrams came within a whisker of forcing a runoff against Kemp by blazing a blue streak across north Atlanta suburbs where Republicans once dominated. …

With Loeffler, who would be the second female U.S. senator in Georgia history, he’s trying to expand the Georgia GOP’s appeal to those moderate and independent voters who have fled the Republican fold.

National Republican Senatorial Committee executive director Kevin McLaughlin said of Collins’ entrance to the race, “All he has done is put two Senate seats, multiple House seats and Georgia’s 16 electoral votes in play.” 

Collins tweeted, “Republican voters in Georgia should choose their candidate — not one politician or a Super PAC in Washington. The time for that contest is now so we can unite well before November. Fighting ourselves and the left at the same time is a bad strategy.”

Club for Growth announced plans to spend $3 million on ads opposing Collins. Collins released a digital ad referring to the group as a “Never Trump, anti-agriculture group” and to a farm bill that he supported and the organization opposed.

After Collins and Democrat Raphael Warnock announced their candidacies last week, The Cook Political Report changed its special election rating from Likely Republican to Lean Republican:

All these dynamics — long and protracted attacks between Collins and Loeffler and the entrance of Warnock — make it clear that this race is moving up the list of GOP headaches and Democratic opportunities, giving them yet another seat in their path to a majority. With its rapidly changing demographics, Georgia is a state that will be contested at the presidential level, and also sees Republican Sen. David Perdue running for re-election. But this is the more competitive race of the two.

While the all-party special general election is not a primary, the race will be the first contest for the Senate seat in Georgia, and it is unlike most other Nov. 3 general elections in that it may not be the last. 

Satellite groups spending on Byrne in Senate primary in AL

Two groups are running ads supporting and opposing U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne in the Senate primary in Alabama, marking an uptick in satellite spending in the race. 

Fighting for Alabama, Inc. spent $351,000 through Jan. 31 on a TV ad calling Byrne “one of President Trump’s strongest defenders.” 

Club for Growth spent $274,000 last week re-airing an ad that first ran in November opposing Byrne. The ad says, “Byrne voted three times to fund a government giveaway program that hands out billions of dollars to help big companies make more profits overseas.” 

Byrne’s campaign representatives have called the Club for Growth a pro-China group that opposed Trump’s presidency and agenda.

Byrne is one of six candidates in the March 3 primary. There will be a March 31 primary runoff if no candidate receives a majority of the primary vote. 

Other candidates include Jeff Sessions, who held the seat for 20 years before the president appointed him U.S. attorney general; former football coach Tommy Tuberville; and 2017 special Senate election candidate Roy Moore, who lost to Doug Jones (D) by 1.7 percentage points.

In two internal polls from the Sessions campaign, Sessions led with 43% and 44%—below the threshold needed to avoid a runoff— and Byrne and Tuberville were in competition for second place.

In addition to satellite spending for and against Byrne, the Senate Conservatives Fund has spent $219,000 since May 2019 on digital ads, direct mail, and more supporting state Rep. Arnold Mooney in the race.

Jones is the first Democrat to win a Senate seat in Alabama since 1992. The Republican primary winner will face him in November.

Feenstra leads IA-04 GOP field in fundraising

In Iowa’s 4th Congressional District GOP primary, year-end campaign finance reports show state Sen. Randy Feenstra starting 2020 with $489,000 in cash on hand compared to $32,000 for incumbent Rep. Steve King.

Feenstra raised $721,000 throughout 2019 to King’s $263,000.

As we reported in our January 22 issue of Heart of the Primaries, King has been in the House since 2003. His closest re-election contest came in 2018 when he defeated J.D. Scholten 50%-47%. 

Bret Richards raised $256,000, the third-most of the Republican field, and had $100,000 on hand. Currently, one candidate is running in the Democratic primary—J.D. Scholten, King’s 2018 opponent. Scholten raised $734,000 and had $540,000 on hand.

The primary is June 2, and the filing deadline is March 13. There are currently six candidates in the Republican primary.

Congressional Leadership Fund releases pro-Granger ads in TX-12

Last week, we looked at the Club for Growth PAC’s endorsement of Chris Putnam’s primary challenge to U.S. Rep. Kay Granger in Texas’ 12th District. Since then, the Congressional Leadership Fund released pro-Granger TV and radio ads highlighting Trump’s endorsement of her. The group said it spent $300,000 on the TV ad.

State executives

New Jersey gubernatorial primary begins to take shape as Ciattarelli launches campaign

Fewer state executive races take place in presidential election years than in midterm years. This year, there are 159 state executive offices on the ballot nationwide, compared to 303 offices up in 2018. Just 37 of those seats are top four offices (governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, and secretary of state); down from 123 in 2018. In this year’s run of Heart of Primaries, our coverage of state executive races will include stories on emerging state executive candidate fields in the 2021 and 2022 elections as well as the most recent news from 2020.

This week, we turn to New Jersey, where Republicans are gearing up to try and retake the governor’s mansion in the 2021 elections. Incumbent Phil Murphy (D) was elected to succeed term-limited Gov. Chris Christie (R) in 2017 and is expected to seek re-election next year, although he has yet to formally declare. The Republican candidate field has begun to take shape this year, with former Assemblyman Jack Ciattarelli launching his campaign Jan. 21.

Ciattarelli, who served seven years in the state Assembly, was one of five Republicans who ran for the GOP nomination in 2017. Although then-Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno defeated him in the primary, Ciattarelli won seven of New Jersey’s 21 counties and was the only candidate other than Guadagno to receive more than 10% support statewide. Ciattarelli’s early endorsers for his 2021 run include Somerset County GOP Chairman Al Gaburo and state Sen. Kip Bateman.

Other potential candidates include state GOP Chairman Doug Steinhardt, state Assembly minority leader Jon Bramnick, and 2017 candidate Joseph “Rudy” Rullo. Another potential candidate, Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi (R) confirmed to Insider NJ on Jan. 31 that she would not run in 2021.

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox picks gubernatorial running mate

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox (R) announced Wednesday that former state Rep. Jon Knokey (R) would serve as his gubernatorial running mate. Candidates for governor of Montana are required to name a running mate at the time they file for election.

Knokey was elected to his Bozeman-area state House seat in 2016, defeating incumbent Christopher Pope (D) by a margin of 0.9 percentage points. Knokey suspended his bid for re-election in August 2018, saying that he had recently accepted a job offer that would leave him without time to serve as a legislator.

Fox’s selection of Knokey leaves Rep. Greg Gianforte as the final Republican candidate who has not yet selected a running mate. State Sen. Al Olszewski is running alongside fellow state Sen. Kenneth Bogner. On the Democratic side, neither Lt. Gov. Mike Cooney nor consultant Whitney Williams has selected a running mate.

The June 2 primary is open to all voters. No Republican candidate has been elected governor in Montana since Judy Martz (R) in 2000.

Follow-up: Second Utah poll finds Huntsman and Cox leading, large segment of undecided voters

Last week, we reported on a Suffolk University/Salt Lake Tribune poll of primary voters in Utah’s gubernatorial race. That poll found former Gov. Jon Huntsman (R) apparently leading Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox (R) 26-18 with 48% of voters undecided. 

A Deseret News/Hinckley Institute poll released Thursday paints a similar picture, with Huntsman apparently leading Cox 33-25 and 25% of voters undecided. None of the other candidates received more than 5% support. The Deseret News poll also surveyed voters who said that they were not Republicans but planned to join the party ahead of the gubernatorial primary. When those voters are included, Huntsman’s apparent lead grows to 35-25, while the share of undecided voters is reduced to 23%.

Six of the seven Republican candidates took part in the first debate of the primary Friday at the Salt Lake Palace Convention Center, discussing education and economic development. The candidate filing deadline is March 19. The June 30 primary will be open to registered Republicans only.

Legislatures

Ohio GOP meeting to reconsider endorsement of candidate

On Thursday, the Ohio Republican Party will meet to reconsider its endorsement of Joe Dills in the three-way Republican primary in House District 65. In January, the party endorsed Dills against the recommendation of the House Republican Caucus, which asked it to endorse Jean Schmidt instead. Schmidt is a political ally of House Speaker Larry Householder.

Dills, Schmidt, and Dillon Blevins are running in the March 17 primary. The winner will face Alan Darnowsky (D) in the general election. The retiring incumbent, John Becker (R), received at least 66 percent of the vote in each of the last four elections. District 66 is located east of Cincinnati. Republicans hold a 61-38 majority in the House.

Retiring TX Speaker donates to seven incumbents

Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen (R) made donations to the campaigns of seven incumbents facing primary challengers this year. He donated $15,000 each to Dan Flynn, Chris Paddie, Geanie Morrison, Jared Patterson, Briscoe Cain, Dennis Paul, and Phil Stephenson. A spokesperson for Bonnen said the donations were given in exchange for help with passing Bonnen’s legislative priorities in last year’s session.

Bonnen announced his retirement in October 2019 after a recording was released of Bonnen telling a group he would give them media credentials in exchange for working to defeat 10 Republican incumbents in the 2020 elections. Bonnen was first elected to the House in 1996 and was elected Speaker in Jan. 2019.

Republican member of AK House coalition retires

Last week, Alaska Rep. Tammie Wilson (R) retired, creating an open race in the 3rd District. Wilson was one of eight Republicans who created a coalition majority with 15 Democrats and two independents in Feb. 2019. This meant that although Republicans had a numerical majority in the House, a Democrat was selected as Speaker. Wilson said she was leaving the legislature in order to take a job with the Alaska Office of Children’s Services.

The filing deadline in Alaska is June 1 and there are so far no declared candidates in the race. All 40 House districts are up for election in November. Republicans hold a 22-15 numerical House majority, along with one vacancy and two unaffiliated members.

Power players

“The Club for Growth is a national network of over 250,000 pro-growth, limited government Americans who share in the belief that prosperity and opportunity come from economic freedom.” – Club for Growth website

The Club for Growth is a 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C. The organization has two political arms, the Club for Growth PAC and Club for Growth Action, a super PAC.

According to the Club for Growth website, the organization focuses on the following issues: budget and spending, education, entitlements, free trade, regulation, taxes, term limits, and tort reform. 

The Club for Growth PAC “endorses and raises money for candidates who stay true to the fundamental principles of limited government and economic freedom,” according to its website. The PAC focuses on U.S. House and Senate races. To view a list of 2020 candidate endorsements, click here.

The super PAC Club for Growth Action can raise and spend unlimited amounts of money. The group cannot contribute directly to a politician or political party, but it can spend independently to campaign for or against political figures. According to the group’s website, it “[runs] independent hard-hitting TV, radio, Internet, and direct mail campaigns in critical Senate and House races across the country.”



Heart of the Primaries 2020, Democrats-Issue 4 (February 5, 2020)

This week: Warnock enters special Senate election in GA, Bernie Sanders, steelworkers’ union issue competing endorsements for governor of New Hampshire, and NY Assemblyman loses endorsement of local party to challenger.

Click here to follow developments on the Republican side. Have a tip or see something we missed? Email us at cory@ballotpedia.org. And please share this newsletter with your colleagues!

Filing deadlines

On the news

Where do Democratic and progressive pundits and commentators disagree? Each week, we bring you excerpts that highlight differing views.

“The one good thing that can come from the disaster of Monday’s botched Iowa vote count is it may convince the national Democratic Party to end the caucuses once and for all.

The case for the Iowa caucuses is now weaker than it’s ever been — and it’s never been strong. Iowa is an unrepresentative state, and its caucuses impose an unconscionable burden on voters who wish to participate. Votes are counted in an absurd way, and the result can diverge significantly from the actual will of the people. …

It should go without saying that there is a better way to hold an election — the method used by the overwhelming majority of states. The state can simply pick a day to hold a primary, give voters a full day to cast ballots, and even allow voters who can’t make it on election day to vote early or absentee.

And in this system, every voter’s ballot will count exactly the same amount.”

Ian Millhiser, Vox, Feb. 4, 2020

“[Iowa]’s done. So now everyone is asking, What do we replace it with? 

Keep in mind that the Democratic Party can’t just make up its own primary calendar, independent of state desires and whatever it is the Republicans want to do. I mean, it could, but it would have to run the operation all by itself. It’s possible via vote by mail, but still, it likely won’t happen. So, say, if national Democrats decided that having Illinois go first made the most sense (it’s the most demographically representative state in the nation), it wouldn’t matter, because the state doesn’t want to go first. The end. So much of this isn’t about what will happen, but about frameworks for alternatives, which would then have to be hashed out through difficult negotiations with state parties, the Republican Party, state legislatures, and governors. Maybe that’s why Iowa and New Hampshire have been able to keep their duopoly for so long?”

Markos Moulitsas, Daily Kos, Feb. 4, 2020

U.S. Congress

Warnock enters special Senate election in GA

Raphael Warnock entered the all-party Nov. 3 special election for Senate in Georgia. Politico‘s James Arkin called Warnock the most prominent Democrat in the race. Currently, the race includes four Democrats, four Republicans, and one independent.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and 2018 Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams endorsed Warnock. 

Warnock is a pastor at Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church and was chairman of the New Georgia Project, a voter registration group Abrams founded.

Warnock’s Jan. 30 announcement came one day after U.S. Rep. Doug Collins (R) entered the race. Incumbent Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R) is also running. Gov. Brian Kemp (R) appointed her to fill the seat following Johnny Isakson’s resignation in December. Several media outlets reported that President Donald Trump wanted Kemp to appoint Collins to the Senate seat.

After the Warnock and Collins announcements, The Cook Political Report changed its special election rating from Likely Republican to Lean Republican:

All these dynamics — long and protracted attacks between Collins and Loeffler and the entrance of Warnock — make it clear that this race is moving up the list of GOP headaches and Democratic opportunities, giving them yet another seat in their path to a majority. With its rapidly changing demographics, Georgia is a state that will be contested at the presidential level, and also sees Republican Sen. David Perdue running for re-election. But this is the more competitive race of the two.

If no candidate receives a majority of the vote, a runoff between the top two will be Jan. 5, 2021.

While the all-party special general election is not a primary, the race will be the first contest for the Senate seat in Georgia, and it is unlike most other Nov. 3 general elections in that it may not be the last. 

Polls show many voters still undecided in Texas Senate race

Two polls conducted in January show voters are still making up their minds about who to support among the 12 candidates seeking the Democratic Senate nomination in Texas.

The Dallas Morning News and the University of Texas-Tyler conducted a poll Jan. 21-30 in which 56% of respondents said they weren’t sure who they’d support. M.J. Hegar polled at 8%. Royce West had 6% support and Annie Garcia had 5%. Four candidates polled at 4%, and five polled at 2% or below.

The poll had a sample of 487 Democratic primary voters and had a margin of error of +/- 4.4 percentage points.

The Texas Lyceum conducted a poll between Jan.10-19 that showed 19% of respondents didn’t know who they’d like to see as the Democratic nominee, and 17% responded “none of the above.” The poll showed Hegar with 11% support, West at 8%, Cristina Tzintzún Ramirez with 7%, and Amanda Edwards at 6%. Four candidates polled at 5%. The remaining four candidates were at 4% or less.

The Texas Lyceum conducted their poll among 401 potential Democratic primary voters, with a margin of error of +/-4.9 percentage points. The group describes itself as a “nonprofit, nonpartisan, statewide leadership organization focused on identifying the state’s next generation of leaders and providing a forum for civil discourse on the important policy discussions facing our state.”

Sen. John Cornyn (R), who is seeking a fourth term, first won election in 2002 and won in 2014 by 27 percentage points. In the 2018 election between Sen. Ted Cruz (R) and Beto O’Rourke (D), Cruz won by 2.6 percentage points.  

Open top-two primary for CA-50 down to one Democratic candidate

Marisa Calderon suspended her campaign for California’s 50th District House seat Jan. 31, citing a need to support ill family members. That leaves Ammar Campa-Najjar as the lone Democrat in the March 3 top-two primary.

Rep. Duncan Hunter resigned from Congress after pleading guilty to a count of conspiracy to misuse campaign funds. The seat will remain vacant until the 2020 winner takes office in January 2021. Campa-Najjar lost to Hunter by 3.4 percentage points in 2018.  

The two candidates with the most votes on March 3, regardless of party, will advance to the Nov. 3 general election.

Four Republicans, three independents, and one member of the Peace and Freedom Party of California are also running. Republican candidates include former 49th Congressional District Rep. Darrell Issa, state Sen. Brian Jones, and former San Diego City Councilmember Carl DeMaio. 

California first used its top-two congressional primary system in 2012. In each 50th District election since, a Democrat and Republican have advanced from the top-two primary, and Hunter won each general election. Of previous 50th District top-two primaries, 2018 had the largest candidate field of seven, including three Republicans, three Democrats, and one independent. 

Three ratings outlets rate the general election Safe/Solid Republican.

State executives

Shavar Jeffries mulls primary challenge to New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy in 2021

Fewer state executive races take place in presidential election years than in midterm years. This year, there are 159 state executive offices on the ballot nationwide, compared to 303 offices up in 2018. Just 37 of those seats are top four offices (governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, and secretary of state); down from 123 in 2018. In this year’s run of Heart of Primaries, our coverage of state executive races will include stories on emerging state executive candidate fields in the 2021 and 2022 elections as well as the most recent news from 2020.

This week, we turn to New Jersey, where first-term Gov. Phil Murphy (D) is up for re-election in 2021. Although Murphy has not yet formally declared he will seek a second term, a potential primary challenge is already shaping up from former assistant New Jersey Attorney General Shavar Jeffries (D), according to the New Jersey Globe.

Jeffries served as assistant attorney general under Anne Milgram (D) between 2008 and 2010. Following Chris Christie’s (R) election as governor and Milgram’s departure as attorney general, Jeffries taught at Seton Hall Law School. In 2014, Jeffries ran in the nonpartisan election for mayor of Newark, losing to then-City Councilor Ras Baraka by a margin of 8.4 percentage points.

Jeffries may face an uphill battle against Murphy —  a New Jersey Globe analysis found that while six of the past 10 New Jersey governors faced primary challengers, just one of those challengers was successful.

Montana House Minority Leader Casey Schreiner ends gubernatorial campaign

State House Minority Leader Casey Schreiner (D) ended his campaign for governor of Montana Monday. Schreiner’s withdrawal leaves Lt. Gov. Mike Cooney (D) and consultant Whitney Williams (D) as the only declared Democrats. Incumbent Steve Bullock (D) is term-limited.

Schreiner was first elected to his Great Falls-area seat in 2012. Term limits prevent him from seeking re-election to the House this year. He is the second candidate to withdraw from the race this year.  Former state Rep. Reilly Neill (D) suspended her campaign Jan. 12. 

The June 2 primary is open to all voters. No Republican candidate has been elected governor in Montana since Judy Martz (R) in 2000.

Bernie Sanders, steelworkers’ union issue competing endorsements in New Hampshire governors race

Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) endorsed New Hampshire Executive Councilor Andru Volinsky (D) for governor Thursday. The same day, the United Steelworkers of America Local 12012 endorsed Volinsky’s opponent, state Senate Majority Leader Dan Feltes (D).

Volinsky was first elected to the five-member Executive Council in 2016 and was re-elected in 2018. Among his other endorsers are former Rep. Carol Shea-Porter (D) and state Sen. Jeanne Dietsch (D). Feltes has served in the state senate since 2014. Eight of his fellow 13 state senate Democrats endorsed him.

Feltes and Volinsky are the only candidates to file for the race so far. The filing deadline is June 12. The Sept. 8 primary is open only to registered Democrats, although unaffiliated voters may join the Democratic Party on the day of the primary and vote the same day. Incumbent Gov. Chris Sununu (R) is running for a third, two-year term.

Legislatures

Niles Township Democrats denounce IL House candidate

As we previously reported in Heart of the Primaries, Illinois Rep. Yehiel Kalish (D) has drawn a primary challenge over his refusal to vote on abortion-related legislation in the most recent legislative session. This week, a local Democratic group in the 16th District spoke out against one of the challengers. The Niles Township Democrats claimed Kevin Olickal promised not to run without their endorsement, but chose to run anyway. They say this hurts their chances of defeating Kalish in the primary. The group has endorsed Denyse Wang Stoneback in the primary.

Politico called the race “Kalish’s to lose,” noting his status as incumbent but also his fundraising figures, totaling $442,000. Stoneback has raised $68,000 to this point, while Olickal has raised $105,000. The primary is March 3, and the winner will be unopposed in the general election.

NY Assemblyman loses local party endorsement to challenger

At a February 1 meeting of the Monroe County Democratic Committee, the group voted to endorse Alex Yudelson over Assemblyman Harry Bronson in the District 138 Democratic primary. Party leaders voted in favor of Yudelson after initial voting by party members across the district resulted in neither candidate receiving a majority of the vote. Bronson said that he disagreed with the calculations from the first round of voting and that the party leaders manipulated the system. Yudelson said he was honored to win the endorsement.

According to the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, Bronson is unpopular with local party leaders for his refusal to support Mayor Lovely Warren’s suggestion that the state temporarily take over the Rochester school board. According to the paper, Warren is the de facto leader of the local party. Yudelson is Warren’s chief of staff, and made remarks at the committee meeting criticizing Bronson’s stance on the takeover.

MN Senate Democrats elect new leader

On Saturday, Minnesota Senate Democrats elected Susan Kent to replace Thomas Bakk as Senate Minority Leader. The vote tally was not made public, and neither Kent nor Bakk issued public statements after the nearly six-hour closed-door meeting. Bakk had led the Senate Democratic Caucus since 2011. The move came two weeks before the start of the 2020 legislative session.

The Star Tribune said that the move was the result of friction between senators who represent urban and suburban districts and Bakk on issues such as mining and guns. It also reported that members of the party were concerned the move could shift more voters in rural districts away from the Democratic Party to the Republican Party.

Power players

“We promote fair elections in Georgia and around the country, encourage voter participation in elections, and educate voters about elections and their voting rights. Fair Fight brings awareness to the public on election reform, advocates for election reform at all levels, and engages in targeted voter registration and other voter outreach programs and communications.” – Fair Fight website

Fair Fight was founded in 2018 by Stacey Abrams, a former Georgia state representative and the 2018 Georgia Democratic gubernatorial nominee. According to the organization’s website, its areas of focus include voter registration, ballot access, and ballot counting. Fair Fight is also suing the Georgia Secretary of State and Board of Elections over what it says are “Georgia’s unconstitutional elections policies and procedures.” 

According to a Jan. 30 interview with Abrams, the organization is currently focused on “making sure that counties and precincts have adequate resources for the March 24 presidential primary” and “holding the Secretary of State accountable for providing proper resources and training to local elections officials so every eligible Georgian can participate without hardship.”

Other recent Fair Fight activity includes an ad titled “Voter Purge,” released at the end of January, which urges Georgia voters to check their voter registration status online.



Federal judge upholds Santa Fe donor disclosure law

On Jan. 29, Judge Judith Herrera, of the U.S. District Court for the District of New Mexico, upheld a Santa Fe city ordinance requiring entities spending $250 or more to advocate for or against ballot propositions to disclose their donors.

Who are the parties to the suit? The plaintiff is the Rio Grande Foundation (RGF), an economic policy think tank whose self-described mission is “to increase liberty and prosperity for all of New Mexico by informing citizens of the importance of individual freedom, limited government, and economic opportunity.” The defendants include the city of Santa Fe and the Santa Fe Ethics and Campaign Review Board (ECRB), which enforces the city’s campaign finance ordinances.

What is at issue? In 2015, the Santa Fe City Council enacted an ordinance requiring any person or group spending $250 or more on ballot measure campaigns to disclose their donors. Any entity meeting that threshold must report “all contributions received for the purpose of paying for such expenditures.” Disclosures must specify the name, address, and occupation of the contributor.

In 2017, Santa Fe conducted a special municipal election in which residents were asked to approve a tax on sweetened drinks. RGF launched a campaign opposing the measure. On April 24, 2017, the ECRB, in response to a citizen complaint, held a hearing to determine whether RGF’s campaign expenditures had exceeded the $250 reporting threshold. The ECRB determined that RGF had done so and ordered the group to file the requisite disclosures. On July 26, 2017, RGF sued the city, alleging the ordinance “chills constitutionally protected speech by non-profit groups and their donors,” in violation of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and Article II of the New Mexico Constitution.

How did the court rule? Herrera, who was appointed to the court by President George W. Bush (R), dismissed the suit in favor of the defendants. In her opinion, Herrera wrote, “RGF’s as-applied challenge fails because there is no evidence of threats, reprisal, harassment, or the like of donors or potential donors to RGF or that would-be donors declined to contribute because of the disclosure requirements. RGF did not rely on any other burdens. Because disclosure requirements serve substantial governmental interests, Defendants met their burden of demonstrating a substantial relation between the governmental informational interest and the information required to be disclosed. Although the Court remains concerned about the potential chilling effect of the ordinance for groups raising and spending small amounts on ballot initiatives, the factual record is insufficient to support the sweeping invalidation of the ordinance that RGF requests[.]”

What comes next? As of Feb. 3, RGF has not indicated whether it intends to appeal Herrera’s decision. The case name and number are Rio Grande Foundation v. City of Santa Fe, 1:17-cv-00768-JCH-CG

The big picture

Number of relevant bills by state: We’re currently tracking 37 pieces of legislation dealing with donor disclosure. On the map below, a darker shade of green indicates a greater number of relevant bills. Click here for a complete list of all the bills we’re tracking.

Disclosure Digest map February 3, 2020.png

Number of relevant bills by current legislative status

Disclosure Digest status chart February 3, 2020.png

Number of relevant bills by partisan status of sponsor(s)

Disclosure Digest partisan chart February 3, 2020.png

Recent legislative actions

Below is a complete list of legislative actions taken on relevant bills since our last issue. Bills are listed in alphabetical order, first by state then by bill number.

  • Oklahoma SB1491: This bill would prohibit public agencies from requiring 501(c) entities to furnish them with personal information about donors.
    • Introduced Feb. 3.
  • Tennessee HB1719: This bill would prohibit public agencies from requiring 501(c) entities to furnish them with personal information about donors.
    • Withdrawn Jan. 29.
  • Virginia HB849: This bill would subject political campaign communications made via online platforms to the same disclosure requirements currently applied to print media, television, and radio advertisements.
    • House approved Jan. 30; referred to Senate Privileges and Elections Committee Jan. 31.


Florida lawmakers consider changes to public-sector union membership and dues processes

Florida lawmakers are considering legislation (H0001) that would, if enacted, change how public-sector employees join, resign from, and pay membership dues to unions.

What does the bill propose? The bill would make the following changes:

  • Requires employees who wish to join a union to sign a membership authorization form. The form must include an acknowledgment that Florida is a right-to-work state and a statement union membership is not a condition of employment.
  • Requires unions to revoke an employee’s membership upon his or her written request. Unions cannot ask for a reason if an employee chooses to resign.
  • Requires a signed authorization to deduct dues from an employee’s salary. Authorizations must be renewed annually.

What comes next? On Jan. 22, the House Oversight, Transparency, and Public Management subcommittee voted 9-5 to approve the bill, which now advances to the House State Affairs Committee. All Democrats and one Republican, Rep. Rene Plasencia, voted against it. A similar bill, SB804, has been introduced in the state Senate, where it is awaiting a committee hearing.

What are the reactions?

  • At a hearing before the House Oversight, Transparency, and Public Management subcommittee on Jan. 22, Rep. James Grant (R), the bill’s sponsor, said, “It is patently offensive for a labor union to be taking direct deposits and holding a member of that union effectively hostage until that person tells them what party they’re affiliated with. These are labor unions, not political organizations.”
  • Rep. Javier Fernandez, who opposes the bill, said, “This bill is not happening in a vacuum. It’s not just happening in Florida. This is part of a concerted effort, a national effort by one organization or handful of organizations advancing an agenda to basically try to erode union membership. They do that by erecting barriers to membership under the guise of worker protection.”
  • Vincent Vernuccio, a senior fellow at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, said, “This bill simply protects public employees in Florida. It confirms that they want to be members of the union and they want to pay the union. It ensures that public employers have the necessary information to deduct dues from their paychecks.”
  • Ron Meyer, an attorney for the Florida Education Association, said, “This bill isn’t the result of problems in Florida. This is a cookie-cutter piece of legislation sponsored by the Mackinac Institute, a well-known, anti-union operation out of Michigan that has a distaste for unions, public-sector unions. My point is, this is a problem that doesn’t exist, and this bill is just a bad idea.”

Bureau of Labor Statistics releases annual union membership estimates

On Jan. 22, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released its annual estimates of union membership in the United States. The full press release and data set can be accessed here, but here are the key takeaways:

  • The BLS estimates that 33.6 percent of public-sector workers nationwide were union members in 2019, roughly five times the membership rate in the private sector (6.2 percent).
    • In 2018, public-sector union membership was estimated at 33.9 percent, a year-over-year decline of 0.3 percentage points.
  • Local government workers were unionized at an estimated rate of 39.4 percent in 2019, down from 40.3 percent in 2018.
  • State workers were unionized at a rate of 29.4 percent in 2019, up from 28.6 percent in 2018.
  • Federal workers were unionized at a rate of 25.6 percent in 2019, down from 26.4 percent in 2018.

What we’ve been reading

The big picture

Number of relevant bills by state

We are currently tracking 70 pieces of legislation dealing with public-sector employee union policy. On the map below, a darker shade of green indicates a greater number of relevant bills. Click here for a complete list of all the bills we’re tracking.

Union Station map January 31, 2020.png

Number of relevant bills by current legislative status

Union Station status chart January 31, 2020.png

Number of relevant bills by partisan status of sponsor(s)

Union Station partisan chart January 31, 2020.png

Recent legislative actions

Below is a complete list of relevant legislative actions taken since our last issue. Bills are listed in alphabetical order, first by state then by bill number.

  • Colorado HB1169: This bill would bar employers from requiring union membership or payment of union dues as a condition of employment.
    • Introduced and referred to House State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee Jan. 28.
  • Hawaii SB2770: This bill would require public employers to reimburse unions for costs associated with collective bargaining, contract administration, etc.
    • Referred to Senate Labor, Culture, and Arts Committee and Judiciary Committee Jan. 27.
  • Maine LD1960: This bill would make communications between municipal/state workers and their unions confidential in proceedings before the Maine Labor Relations Board.
    • Judiciary Committee hearing scheduled Jan. 29.
  • Maryland HB214: This bill would grant collective bargaining rights to graduate assistants in the University of Maryland system, Morgan State University, and St. Mary’s College.
    • House Appropriations Committee hearing scheduled Jan. 28.
  • Maryland SB388: This bill would grant collective bargaining rights to certain employees of the circuit courts and the District Court of Maryland.
    • Introduced Jan. 27. Senate Finance Committee hearing Jan. 29.
  • New Hampshire HB1290: This bill would require the state public employee labor relations board to permit employees to vote by mail in certification elections.
    • House Labor, Industrial, and Rehabilitative Services Committee executive session scheduled Jan. 29.
  • New Hampshire HB1322: This bill would prohibit university system funds from being used to oppose the formation of unions.
    • House Labor, Industrial, and Rehabilitative Services Committee hearing scheduled Jan. 29.
  • New Hampshire SB651: This bill would prohibit collective bargaining agreements that require employees to join or contribute to a union.
    • Senate Judiciary Committee hearing scheduled Jan. 30.
  • New Mexico SB110: This bill would make various amendments to the state’s public-sector labor relations laws.
    • Senate Public Affairs Committee hearing scheduled Jan. 31.
  • Virginia HB327: This bill would allow state and local government employers to recognize any union as the bargaining agent of any public employees.
    • House Labor and Commerce Committee hearing scheduled Jan. 28.
  • Virginia HB582: This bill would repeal the existing prohibition against collective bargaining by public employees.
    • Amended version reported out of House Appropriations Committee Jan. 29.
  • Washington HB1333: This bill would alter the definition of a public employee under the state’s public employee’s collective bargaining law.
    • Referred to House Rules Committee Jan. 28.
  • Washington HB2017: This bill would establish collective bargaining rights for administrative law judges.
    • House Appropriations Committee executive session scheduled Jan. 30.


41 pledged delegates at stake in Democratic Iowa caucuses

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 3, 2020: The Iowa caucuses take place on Monday, where there are 41 pledged delegates at stake for Democrats. The Democratic National Committee released its criteria for the Feb. 19 presidential primary debate in Las Vegas, Nevada. blank    blankblank   


Which of the following Democrats won the narrowest Iowa caucus victory in party history?

Notable Quote of the Day

“A presidential campaign axiom holds that there are only three tickets out of Iowa. While former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) have the loyal bases and national polling leads to remain in contention regardless of the outcome in the first state to vote, the fortunes of Warren, Buttigieg and Klobuchar rest heavily on how they perform here. …

The three are also facing different challenges: Warren is aiming to relieve voters’ anxiety about whether she can actually defeat Trump, Buttigieg is hoping to persuade Iowans that an outsider is what they need and Klobuchar must convince voters she has enough momentum to actually win.

While Warren, Buttigieg and Klobuchar all need to outperform expectations, it’s unlikely all three will be able to: They’re all competing for the same type of high-information, college-educated voters who have bounced from candidate to candidate over the course of the now year-old primary race. “

– Kevin Robillard, HuffPost

Iowa Caucuses

The first presidential nominating event of the 2020 election cycle takes place in Iowa on Monday. On the Democratic side, 41 pledged delegates are at stake. On the Republican side, 40 delegates are available.

Democrats

  • The Democratic National Committee released its qualifying criteria for the Feb. 19 presidential primary debate in Las Vegas, Nevada. Candidates have three paths to qualify: (1) receive at least one pledged delegate in the Iowa caucuses or New Hampshire primary; (2) receive 10 percent support in four national, Nevada, and/or South Carolina polls; or (3) receive 12 percent support in two Nevada and/or South Carolina polls. Each poll must be publicly released between Jan. 15 and Feb. 18. The donor threshold used in previous debates was eliminated.

  • Three candidates have already qualified: former Vice President Joe Biden and Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. Only two other candidates have at least one qualifying poll: Michael Bloomberg and Pete Buttigieg.

  • Michael Bennet released his final campaign ad in New Hampshire on Friday. The clip focuses on his electability against Trump.

  • The Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU), which has 200,000 members, endorsed Joe Biden on Saturday. In the 2016 presidential election, ATU had endorsed Sanders. Rep. Danny Davis (Ill.) also endorsed Biden.

  • Rep. Ben McAdams (Utah) endorsed Michael Bloomberg on Friday. On Saturday, Bloomberg opened his Colorado campaign headquarters in Denver. He also released his tax plan, which would increase the corporate tax rate to 28 percent and add a surtax of 5 percent to incomes over $5 million.

  • The Pete Buttigieg campaign is hosting a watch party in Des Moines, Iowa, on Monday. He appeared on HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher, where he discussed his electability and race.

  • Tulsi Gabbard will hold a virtual roundtable with attorney Sean Callagy on Monday.

  • Rep. Linda Sánchez (Calif.) endorsed Amy Klobuchar on Saturday. The campaign is hosting its caucus watch party in Des Moines on Monday.

  • Deval Patrick will campaign in New Hampshire on Monday, making stops in North Conway, Hanover, New London, and Nashua.

  • The Wall Street Journal published a profile of Bernie Sanders’ policies throughout his career titled “The Socialist Evolution of Bernie Sanders.” Sanders is hosting his caucus night party in Des Moines on Monday.

  • The Tom Steyer campaign unionized with representation from International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 2325. Mattie Thomas, the co-chair of the Black Women’s Caucus of South Carolina, endorsed Steyer.

  • Iowa Democratic Party Chairwoman Sue Dvorsky endorsed Elizabeth Warren on Friday. Warren released four more campaign ads; three will run in Iowa and one will air in New Hampshire.

  • Andrew Yang announced that he had raised $6.7 million in January, bringing in $1.2 million on Jan. 31. He is campaigning in New Hampshire on Monday.

Republicans

Flashback: February 3, 2016

Rand Paul and Rick Santorum ended their presidential campaigns following the Iowa caucuses.blank

Click here to learn more.



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