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Michigan senate president raises $0 this election cycle

According to campaign finance reports filed with the Michigan Secretary of State, Michigan Lt. Gov. Garlin Gilchrist II has raised $0 and spent $4,424 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 20, 2022. Gilchrist currently serves as the president of the state senate.

Gilchrist is a member of the Democratic Party and assumed office in 2019. In Michigan, the president of the senate is one of the roles of the lieutenant governor. The primary job of a state senate president is to preside over legislative sessions and ensure that members of the chamber abide by procedural rules. Gilchrist’s current term ends in 2023.

Gilchrist’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2020-2021)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Gilchrist

Gilchrist has raised $0 for the 2022 election cycle.

Expenditures by Gilchrist

Gilchrist reported $4,424 in expenditures, with the entire sum going to two payees. 

Top Expenditures by Gilchrist (1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$3,411.25Democratic State Central CommitteeENTITY
2.$1,013.00Clark Hill Political Action CommENTITY

How donations to Gilchrist compare to the equivalent role in other states

A number of factors, including whether the position holder is the lieutenant governor or a state senator, can influence donor activity. Here is how Gilchrist compares to the 10 other senate presidents with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 30 senate presidents are members of the Republican Party and 19 are members of the Democratic Party, with one vacancy. The lieutenant governor serves as the president of the senate in 25 states. In other states, the president of the senate is a state senator chosen by the members of the chamber. 

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
2022 Pre-General10/28/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Minnesota senate president raises $35,360 this election cycle

According to campaign finance reports filed with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board, Minnesota State Sen. David Osmek has raised $35,360 and spent $8,118 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022. Osmek currently serves as the president of the state senate.

Osmek is a member of the Republican Party and assumed office in 2013. In Minnesota, the president of the senate is a state senator elected to the role by the members of the chamber. The primary job of a state senate president is to preside over legislative sessions and ensure that members of the chamber abide by procedural rules. Osmek’s current term ends in 2023.

Osmek’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Osmek

Of the $35,360 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, $18,000 came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Osmek (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$5,000.0033rd Senate District RPMENTITY
2.$5,000.00David OsmekINDIVIDUAL
3.$1,000.00Gabi MolnarINDIVIDUAL
4.$1,000.00Gabriel JabbourINDIVIDUAL
5.$1,000.00George ZenankoINDIVIDUAL
6.$1,000.00Greg MolnarINDIVIDUAL
7.$1,000.00Jean SimonINDIVIDUAL
8.$1,000.00Jerry O RelphENTITY
9.$1,000.00John BralandINDIVIDUAL
10.$1,000.00Justin ZenankoINDIVIDUAL

Expenditures by Osmek

Osmek reported $8,118 in expenditures, with $7,515 going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by Osmek (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$2,034.27Suburban ChevroletENTITY
2.$1,775.79MicrocenterENTITY
3.$825.00David OsmekINDIVIDUAL
4.$742.58George ZenankoINDIVIDUAL
5.$530.21Chase Printing Company IncENTITY
6.$452.51T-MobileENTITY
7.$352.77Frank LongINDIVIDUAL
8.$315.48Back Channel BrewingENTITY
9.$250.00TargetENTITY
10.$236.66David OsmekENTITY

How donations to Osmek compare to the equivalent role in other states

A number of factors, including whether the position holder is the lieutenant governor or a state senator, can influence donor activity. Here is how Osmek compares to the 10 other senate presidents with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 30 senate presidents are members of the Republican Party and 19 are members of the Democratic Party, with one vacancy. The lieutenant governor serves as the president of the senate in 25 states. In other states, the president of the senate is a state senator chosen by the members of the chamber. 

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
2022 Q14/14/2022
2022 Q26/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
2022 Q39/27/2022
2022 Q410/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



One month to Missouri primary

Missouri’s 2022 primary election is in one month. It is scheduled for Aug. 2. The filing deadline was on March 29.

A primary election is used to narrow the field of candidates for certain positions or to determine the political party nominees before a general election. Missouri has an open primary. Voters are not required to be affiliated with a political party in order to vote in that party’s primary. Voters are also able to declare any party at the polls regardless of previous party affiliation. 

In the Missouri primary, voters throughout the state will select one candidate to serve in the U.S. Senate, eight candidates to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, a state auditor, 17 state senators, and 163 state representatives. Clay County, Jackson County, Platte County, and the city of St. Louis have municipal positions that will be on the ballot. Using Ballotpedia’s sample ballot lookup tool, voters can find the candidates that will be on their ballot on Aug. 2. 

Those who wish to vote in person must be registered by July 6. Registration is possible online, in person, or by mail. If registration forms are mailed, they must be postmarked on or before July 6. The state of Missouri does not have early voting. Those who qualify for an absentee ballot must have their request form received in the mail by July 20. 

Additional reading:



Florida senate president raises $0 this election cycle

According to campaign finance reports filed with the Florida Secretary of State, Florida Lt. Governor Jeanette Nunez has raised $0 and spent $394 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 11, 2022. Nunez currently serves as the president of the state senate.

Nunez is a member of the Republican Party and assumed office in 2019. In Florida, the president of the senate is one of the roles of the lieutenant governor. The primary job of a state senate president is to preside over legislative sessions and ensure that members of the chamber abide by procedural rules. Nunez is running for re-election in 2022 and her current term ends in 2023.

Nunez’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Nunez

Nunez has raised $0 for the 2022 election cycle.

Expenditures by Nunez

Nunez reported $394 in expenditures, with the entire sum going to one payee. 

Top Expenditures by Nunez (1/1/2021 – 4/11/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$394.21Kristi HouseEntity

How donations to Nunez compare to the equivalent role in other states

A number of factors, including whether the position holder is the lieutenant governor or a state senator, can influence donor activity. Here is how Nunez compares to the 10 other senate presidents with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 30 senate presidents are members of the Republican Party and 19 are members of the Democratic Party, with one vacancy. The lieutenant governor serves as the president of the senate in 25 states. In other states, the president of the senate is a state senator chosen by the members of the chamber. 

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Florida PACs submitted to the Florida Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Q4 Data (2021 M12)1/10/2022
2022 M34/11/2022
2022 Primary 27/8/2022
2022 Primary 58/5/2022
2022 General 19/2/2022
2022 General 39/30/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Indiana senate president raises $1.3 million this election cycle

According to campaign finance reports filed with the Indiana Secretary of State, Indiana Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch has raised $1.3 million and spent $210,993 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 8, 2022. Crouch currently serves as the president of the state senate.

Crouch is a member of the Republican Party and assumed office in 2017. In Indiana, the president of the senate is one of the roles of the lieutenant governor. The primary job of a state senate president is to preside over legislative sessions and ensure that members of the chamber abide by procedural rules. Crouch’s current term ends in 2025.

Crouch’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Crouch

Of the $1,326,550 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, $212,684 came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Crouch (1/1/2021 – 4/8/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$42,500.00John C SchroederINDIVIDUAL
2.$25,000.00Richard K Byers JrINDIVIDUAL
3.$25,000.00Vicki and Rick L JamesINDIVIDUAL
4.$22,500.00Theresa and Ira BootsINDIVIDUAL
5.$21,000.00Cindy and Robert KochINDIVIDUAL
6.$20,000.00Karen S CinelliINDIVIDUAL
7.$17,500.00Charter Communications LLCENTITY
8.$15,000.00Eric J BedelINDIVIDUAL
9.$12,500.00Wayne C KinneyINDIVIDUAL
10.$11,683.59Indiana Builders Political Action CommitteeENTITY

Expenditures by Crouch

Crouch reported $210,993 in expenditures, with $157,906 going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by Crouch (1/1/2021 – 4/8/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$99,458.30Ma Patterson LLCENTITY
2.$12,335.78Oak Meadow Country ClubENTITY
3.$11,779.25Indiana Republican State Committee, IncENTITY
4.$10,489.69Raise the Money IncENTITY
5.$8,062.27Midwest Communications Group LLCENTITY
6.$4,645.00El ToroENTITY
7.$3,606.46Yasmin L Stump Law Group PCENTITY
8.$2,791.46Rhonda HansonENTITY
9.$2,494.73Colin PatrickENTITY
10.$2,243.00United States Postal ServiceENTITY

How donations to Crouch compare to the equivalent role in other states

A number of factors, including whether the position holder is the lieutenant governor or a state senator, can influence donor activity. Here is how Crouch compares to the 10 other senate presidents with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 30 senate presidents are members of the Republican Party and 19 are members of the Democratic Party, with one vacancy. The lieutenant governor serves as the president of the senate in 25 states. In other states, the president of the senate is a state senator chosen by the members of the chamber. 

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/19/2022
2022 Statewide Quarterly/Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-Election10/17/2022
2022 Statewide Quarterly11/1/2022
2022 Annual Report1/18/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Davis defeated Collins in Illinois’ 7th Congressional District on June 28, 2022

Incumbent Danny K. Davis, Kina Collins, and Denarvis Mendenhall ran in the Democratic primary for Illinois’ 7th Congressional District on June 28, 2022. Davis, who has represented the district in Congress since 1997, won the primary with 52.3% of the vote. Collins received 45.3% of the vote, and Mendenhall received 2.4%.

Davis focused his campaign on familiarity with the district’s voters, saying, “This is my community…This is my home. This is my life.” Davis’ campaign yard signs read, “Re-elect Danny Davis. He’s someone you know,” and his campaign website highlighted his congressional voting record and seniority on congressional committees and caucuses. Collins’ campaign did not draw a contrast with Davis on policy but said Collins would provide the district with a fresh voice in Washington. Collins emphasized the fact that Davis has represented the district since she was in kindergarten and said that it was time for a change. She said, “I’m not just running to be the congresswoman in the Illinois 7th, but to talk about a vision for the Democratic Party, which includes young people, people of color, women, and those who do not come from traditional political backgrounds.” Collins’ campaign raised more money than Davis’, according to reports from the Federal Election Commission. Analysts described this primary race as a bellwether for generational tensions within the Democratic Party.

Prior to serving in Congress, Davis served on the Chicago City Council for 11 years as alderman of the 29th Ward. He also served on the Cook County Board of Commissioners from 1990 to 1996. He was elected to the U.S. House to represent Illinois’ 7th Congressional District in 1996. Davis served on the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee and was a member of the Congressional Black Caucus and the Progressive Caucus. Davis’ re-election was endorsed by President Joe Biden (D), Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker (D), Illinois Senators Tammy Duckworth (D) and Dick Durbin (D), and Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot.

Collins became a protest organizer in the wake of the Chicago police shooting of Laquan McDonald in 2014 and founded the Chicago Neighborhood Alliance, a group describing its goal as to help end gun violence through civic engagement, in 2017. Collins lost to Davis in Illinois’ 7th Congressional District’s 2020 Democratic primary. She also served on the transition team and task force for gun violence prevention under President Joe Biden (D). Collins’ campaign was endorsed by several aldermen in the 7th District and the national political organizations Indivisible, Justice Democrats, and National Organization for Women.

Before the primary, the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections all rated Illinois’ 7th Congressional District as a solid/safe Democratic seat, meaning that as the winner of the Democratic primary, Davis is very likely to win the general election as well.



Former U.S. Rep. Matt Salmon withdraws from Arizona governor’s race

Former U.S. Rep. Matt Salmon withdrew from the Republican primary for governor of Arizona on June 28, 2022, saying that “primary voters deserve more than having their votes split.” Salmon endorsed Karrin Taylor Robson the following day.

Club for Growth and FreedomWorks had endorsed Salmon, along with U.S. Sens. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Mike Lee (R-Utah), Cynthia Lummis (R-Wyo.), and U.S. Reps. Andy Biggs (R- Ariz.), David Schweikert (R-Ariz.), and Jim Jordan (R-Ohio). Salmon’s withdrawal came after the deadline for his name to be removed from the ballot.

In addition to Taylor Robson, Kari Lake, Scott Neely, and Paola Tulliani-Zen are on the ballot for the August 2 primary. Incumbent Gov. Doug Ducey (R) is term-limited.

Lake and Taylor Robson lead in endorsements, polls, and funding.

Lake, who formerly worked as a news anchor for Fox 10 News in Phoenix, Arizona, said she is “running … on a platform of common sense conservatism dedicated to individual liberties, low taxes, limited regulation, and protecting Arizona’s great Western heritage.” Lake said, ” The ongoing border crisis is nothing less than a national security and humanitarian disaster. … I will not wait for Washington’s approval or rely on the empty promises of far-away politicians to do what’s best for Arizonans.” She said, “After I take my hand off the Bible, we are going to issue a declaration of invasion. We are going to finish President Trump’s wall, and we are going to send our armed National Guard to the border and stop people from coming across.”

Former President Donald Trump (R) endorsed Lake, along with U.S. Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), U.S. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-Ariz.), the Conservative Political Action Coalition, and the Arizona Fraternal Order of Police.

Taylor Robson, a former member of the Arizona Board of Regents and founder of a land-use strategy firm, said, “We need a leader with a record of accomplishment, not a career talker with the teleprompter.” She said, “I built my own businesses. I do more than talk for a living.” Taylor Robson said that border security would be her first priority and that she would “surge National Guard troops to the border, equip the Border Strike Force with the latest technology, and finish the wall.” She also said, “I am uniquely qualified to lead this state into the future and to secure and protect Arizona’s water. My experience includes decades managing land, water and other natural resource issues, as well as working with government at all levels.”

Former Arizona Govs. Jan Brewer (R) and John Fife Symington III (R) endorsed Taylor Robson, as did former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R), Arizona state Senate President Karen Fann (R), and Americans For Prosperity.

With regard to the 2020 presidential election, Lake said that President Joe Biden (D) “lost the election and he shouldn’t be in the White House.” In a campaign ad, Lake said, “If you’re watching this ad right now, it means you’re in the middle of watching a fake news program. You know how to know it’s fake? Because they won’t even cover the biggest story out there, the rigged election of 2020.” In an interview with Fox News, Lake said, “… [W]e had a fraudulent election, a corrupt election, and we have an illegitimate president sitting in the White House.”

Taylor Robson said, “Joe Biden may be the president, but the election wasn’t fair. States across the country changed their voting rules in the weeks and months before the election; the mainstream media generally refused to cover stories harmful to Joe Biden; and Big Tech actively suppressed conservative voices. No wonder a sizable percentage of Arizona Republicans still feel the way they do about 2020.” She said, “I am focused on 2022 because the left is 10 steps ahead of us. … I will do everything I can to ensure Arizona is in Republican hands for the 2024 election when we can take back the White House.”

Patrick Finerd, Carlos Roldan, and Alex Schatz are running as write-ins in the primary.

Major independent observers rate the general election as a toss-up. Ducey was first elected in 2014 and won re-election in 2018 by a margin of 14 percentage points. Repulicans have held trifecta control of Arizona state government since 2009.



Seven propositions on California’s general election ballot this year

June 30 was the deadline for ballot propositions to qualify for the November general election ballot in California. The deadline applied to signature verification, ballot proposition withdrawal, and legislative referrals.

Californians will be deciding on seven ballot propositions—six citizen-initiated measures and one legislatively referred constitutional amendment.

At the top of the ballot will be a constitutional amendment to prohibit the state from interfering with or denying an individual’s right to an abortion and use of contraceptives. The amendment passed the state legislature on June 27 after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey on June 24. With the proposition’s certification, 2022 became the year with the most ballot measures addressing abortion on record with five.

Voters will also decide on the following citizen-initiated measures:

  • A constitutional amendment and statute backed by American Indian tribes to legalize sports betting at American Indian gaming casinos and licensed racetracks in California with a 10% tax on profits;
  • A constitutional amendment and statute backed by national sportsbook companies, like FanDuel and DraftKings, to legalize online and mobile sports betting outside of American Indian lands with a 10% tax on revenues dedicated to programs to address homelessness and tribal economic development;
  • A law to require a minimum source of annual funding—equal to, at minimum, 1% of the total state and local revenues that local education agencies received under Proposition 98 (1988) during the prior fiscal year—for K-12 public schools, including charter schools, to fund arts education programs;
  • A law to enact staffing requirements, reporting requirements, ownership disclosure, and closing requirements for chronic dialysis clinics;
  • A law to increase the tax on personal income above $2 million by 1.75% and dedicate revenue to zero-emission vehicle projects and wildfire prevention programs; and
  • A veto referendum to uphold or repeal the ban on flavored tobacco sales.

Two initiatives related to plastic waste reduction and medical malpractice caps had previously qualified for the November ballot but were removed by sponsors after legislative compromises were passed.

An initiative related to pandemic-related research and funding and another that would increase the state minimum wage to $18 missed the signature verification deadline on the 30th. The first had 981,582 of the 997,139 signatures needed, and the latter had 608,293 of the 623,212 signatures needed at the time of the deadline. With counties still processing signatures, the initiatives could appear on the ballot in 2024.

The legislature adjourned on Thursday before taking a final vote to refer a constitutional amendment to join five other states in 2022 in removing constitutional language permitting enslavement or servitude as criminal punishments or debt payments.

Fifty-three initiatives were filed in California for the 2022 ballot. With six initiatives qualifying for the ballot, the ballot initiative certification rate for 2022 was 11.3%. Between 2010 and 2020, the average ballot initiative certification rate was 11.9%. The lowest rate was in 2014 with 4.5% or four of 89 initiatives qualifying for the ballot. The highest rate was 2020 with 17.4% or eight of 46 initiatives qualifying for the ballot.

Between 1985 and 2020, California ballots featured 395 ballot propositions with 58% or 228 measures approved and 42% or 167 measures defeated.



SCOTUS applies major questions doctrine to limit agency authority

The U.S. Supreme Court on June 30, 2022, invoked the major questions doctrine in a decision that limits the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. The ruling in West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) could limit the efforts of other federal agencies to engage in broad policymaking not specifically authorized by Congress.

The case concerned whether Congress had delegated regulatory power to the EPA concerning greenhouse gas emissions. The court found that nowhere in the Clean Air Act had Congress granted the EPA specific authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions and, therefore, the agency had overstepped its authority when it attempted to enact such a regulatory scheme under the Obama-era Clean Power Plan.

The court’s decision centered on the major questions doctrine—a principle of judicial review that requires Congress to speak clearly when it delegates regulatory authority to agencies on questions of political or economic significance. As Chief Justice John Roberts stated in the majority opinion, the major questions doctrine “took hold because it refers to an identifiable body of law that has developed over a series of significant cases all addressing a particular and recurring problem: agencies asserting highly consequential power beyond what Congress could reasonably be understood to have granted. Scholars and jurists have recognized the common threads between those decisions. So have we.”

Justice Elena Kagan issued a dissenting opinion, arguing that the majority ruling prevents the EPA from taking congressionally authorized action. “The Court appoints itself—instead of Congress or the expert agency—the decisionmaker on climate policy,” wrote Kagan. “I cannot think of many things more frightening.”

SCOTUSblog analyst Amy Howe described what she and other scholars consider to be the significance of the ruling, claiming that Robert’s opinion “likely will have ripple effects far beyond the EPA. His reasoning applies to any major policymaking effort by federal agencies.”

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Federal Register weekly update: 599 documents added

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From June 27 through July 1, the Federal Register grew by 1,756 pages for a year-to-date total of 39,732 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 599 documents:

  • 460 notices
  • Five presidential documents
  • 44 proposed rules
  • 90 final rules

Four proposed rules, including revisions to criteria for evaluating cardiovascular disorders under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act from the Social Security Administration, and seven final rules, including standards to implement renewable fuel volume targets from the Environmental Protection Agency were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 99 significant proposed rules, 127 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of July 1.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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