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These 10 Pennsylvania donors gave over $22.1 million

In Pennsylvania politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $308.6 million in total donations between January 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021. The 10 largest donors gave more than $22.1 million, or 7 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Pennsylvania state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State:

Top 10 Pennsylvania Donors (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankDonor NameTotal Donations
1Jeffrey Yass$13,520,000
2Debra Ann and David J White$2,074,833
3Deborah Simon$1,350,000
4Karla T Jurvetson$1,006,100
5Jennifer Duda$1,000,000
6Paul J Martino$948,219
7Chani and Steven Laufer$853,915
8Thomas B Hagen$510,000
9Clay Hamlin$450,000
10William Harris$400,000

The list of Pennsylvania donors in this time period includes more than 4,555 individuals identified by name in the Pennsylvania Department of State’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Pennsylvania PACs submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual (C7)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C1)3/17/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C2)5/9/2022
2022 Post-Primary (C3)6/20/2022
2022 Pre-General (C4)9/22/2022
2022 Pre-General (C5)10/31/2022
2022 Post-General (C6)12/12/2022
2022 Annual (C7)2/1/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Democrats outraise Republicans by 33% in Pennsylvania House races

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the House submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. It includes activity between January 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021.

Top fundraisers in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives by party

The top fundraisers in Pennsylvania House of Representatives elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Kevin Boyle – $975,525
  • Matthew Bradford – $957,046
  • Brian Sims – $684,444
  • Joanna McClinton – $564,189
  • Malcolm Kenyatta – $260,096

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Bryan Cutler – $457,816
  • Greg Rothman – $388,370
  • Thomas Mehaffie (District 106) – $366,250
  • Stanley Saylor – $328,638
  • Andrew Lewis – $247,050

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $6.82 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $4.90 million. Combined, all House fundraisers in the January 1, 2021, through December 31, 2021, filing period raised $11.73 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 50 percent of all Democratic House fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 36 percent of all Republican House fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers during this period.

TOP TEN FUNDRAISERS – PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (January 1, 2021, through December 31, 2021)

NameParty AffiliationRaisedSpent
Kevin BoyleDemocratic Party$975,525$262,423
Matthew BradfordDemocratic Party$957,046$680,164
Brian SimsDemocratic Party$684,444$347,055
Joanna McClintonDemocratic Party$564,189$240,851
Bryan CutlerRepublican Party$457,816$569,912
Greg RothmanRepublican Party$388,370$124,536
Thomas MehaffieRepublican Party$366,250$60,039
Stanley SaylorRepublican Party$328,638$299,465
Malcolm KenyattaDemocratic Party$260,096$167,505
Andrew LewisRepublican Party$247,050$119,711

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. In 2022, Transparency USA will publish campaign finance data after the following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual (C7)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C1)3/17/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C2)5/9/2022
2022 Post-Primary (C3)6/20/2022
2022 Pre-General (C4)9/22/2022
2022 Pre-General (C5)10/31/2022
2022 Post-General (C6)12/12/2022
2022 Annual (C7)2/1/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Republicans outraise Democrats by 29% in Pennsylvania Senate races

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Pennsylvania State Senate, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the State Senate submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. It includes activity between January 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021.

Top fundraisers in the Pennsylvania State Senate by party

The top fundraisers in Pennsylvania State Senate elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Martin Flynn – $903,508
  • Vincent Hughes – $738,860
  • Jay Costa – $552,950
  • Anthony Williams – $379,572
  • Steve Santarsiero – $329,508

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Kim Ward – $1,118,172
  • Jake Corman III – $568,746
  • Pat Browne – $408,225
  • Greg Rothman (District 34) – $388,370
  • Camera Bartolotta – $321,443

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $4.25 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $5.71 million. Combined, all State Senate fundraisers in the January 1, 2021, through December 31, 2021, filing period raised $10.25 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 68 percent of all Democratic State Senate fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 49 percent of all Republican State Senate fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers during this period.

TOP TEN FUNDRAISERS – PENNSYLVANIA STATE SENATE (January 1, 2021, through December 31, 2021)

NameParty AffiliationRaisedSpent
Kim WardRepublican Party$1,118,172$346,406
Martin FlynnDemocratic Party$903,508$689,520
Vincent HughesDemocratic Party$738,860$482,989
Jake Corman IIIRepublican Party$568,746$554,460
Jay CostaDemocratic Party$552,950$432,000
Pat BrowneRepublican Party$408,225$208,151
Greg RothmanRepublican Party$388,370$124,536
Anthony WilliamsDemocratic Party$379,572$137,251
Steve SantarsieroDemocratic Party$329,508$107,773
Camera BartolottaRepublican Party$321,443$196,236

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. In 2022, Transparency USA will publish campaign finance data after the following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual (C7)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C1)3/17/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C2)5/9/2022
2022 Post-Primary (C3)6/20/2022
2022 Pre-General (C4)9/22/2022
2022 Pre-General (C5)10/31/2022
2022 Post-General (C6)12/12/2022
2022 Annual (C7)2/1/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Pennsylvania Supreme Court enacts new congressional map

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court selected a new congressional district map, officially enacting that map as part of the post-2020 redistricting process on Feb. 23. Pennsylvania was apportioned 17 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives after the 2020 census, one fewer than it received after the 2010 census. This map will take effect for Pennsylvania’s 2022 congressional elections.

Over a dozen maps were submitted to the supreme court, including by the state legislature. The court ultimately selected the Carter map in a 4-3 ruling, which a group of Pennsylvania citizens that were petitioners in a redistricting-related lawsuit submitted. Justices Max Baer (D), Christine Donohue (D), Kevin Dougherty (D), and David Wecht (D) ruled in the majority. Justices Debra Todd (D), Sallie Mundy (R), and Kevin Brobson (R) dissented.

The state supreme court took authority over the redistricting process after Gov. Tom Wolf (D) vetoed the legislature’s enacted map on Jan. 26. The Pennsylvania House of Representatives voted to approve the vetoed map 110-91 on Jan. 12, and the Pennsylvania State Senate voted 29-20 to approve the map on Jan. 24. Following Wolf’s veto, the authority for determining a new map initially rested with a lower court, but in a Feb. 2 order, the supreme court ruled that it would have control over the process to select a new congressional map.

As of Feb. 23, 35 states have adopted congressional district maps, and one state has approved congressional district boundaries that have not yet taken effect. Federal or state courts have blocked previously adopted maps in two states, and six states have not yet adopted new congressional redistricting plans. As of Feb. 23 in 2012, 40 states had enacted congressional redistricting plans.

States have completed congressional redistricting for 347 of the 435 seats (79.8%) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

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Pennsylvania labor secretary reports $570 million in unemployment insurance fraud during pandemic

In testimony before the House Labor and Industry Committee on Feb. 10, 2022, Pennsylvania Secretary of Labor and Industry Jennifer Berrier estimated that the state paid $570 million of fraudulent unemployment insurance benefits from March 1, 2020, through Sept. 30, 2021. The fraudulent payments represented about 6.3% of the total unemployment insurance payments made during the same period.

Unemployment insurance refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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Pennsylvania enacts new legislative maps

Pennsylvania enacted new state legislative districts on Feb. 4, 2022, when the Pennsylvania Legislative Reapportionment Commission voted to approve new maps. The maps will take effect for Pennsylvania’s 2022 state legislative elections.

The commission approved the maps in a single 4-1 vote. House Majority Leader Kerry Benninghoff (R) voted no, while Senate Majority Leader Kim Ward (R), state Rep. Joanna McClinton (D), state Sen. Jay Costa (D), and chairman Mark Nordenberg voted yes.

The Pennsylvania Reapportionment Commission has existed since 1968. It comprises five members. The majority and minority leaders of the state House and Senate appoint four members. The other four members, or the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, appoint the fifth. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court appointed Nordenberg after the four other members did not vote on a fifth member.

Following the approval of the maps, commission Nordenberg said, “I believe that we have succeeded by virtually any measure. […] Even if imperfect, these are good maps that are fair, that are responsive to the requirements of the law, and that will serve the interests of the people of Pennsylvania for the next decade.” During the drafting process, House Majority Leader Kerry Benninghoff (R) criticized the maps, saying, “I see this map as extremely partisan gerrymandered. […] The map before us is nothing short of a danger to our system of government that upends established norms and the emphasis on local control and local voices that Pennsylvanians hold dear.”

Thirty-two states have adopted new state legislative maps and one state has adopted maps that have not yet gone into effect as of Feb. 8. The state supreme courts in two states have overturned previously enacted maps, and 15 states have not yet adopted legislative redistricting plans after the 2020 census. Thirty-seven states had enacted legislative redistricting plans after the 2010 census as of Feb. 8, 2012.

Nationwide, states have completed legislative redistricting for 1,338 of 1,972 state Senate seats (67.8%) and 3,158 of 5,411 state House seats (58.3%).

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Pennsylvania Supreme Court rules against 2019 Marsy’s Law Crime Victims Rights Amendment

In 2019, 74% of voters at the election on Nov. 5, 2019, voted to approve the Pennsylvania Marsy’s Law Crime Victims Rights Amendment. Results were never certified because the Commonwealth Court enjoined then-Acting Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar from certifying election results pending litigation. On Dec. 21, 2021, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, in a 6-1 ruling, decided that the ballot measure violated the state constitution’s separate-vote requirement for proposed constitutional amendments.

In Pennsylvania, the separate-vote requirement states, “When two or more amendments shall be submitted, they shall be voted upon separately.” Pennsylvania is one of at least six states with a separate-vote requirement for constitutional amendments. In 2017, the Montana Supreme Court struck down a Marsy’s Law as violating that state’s separate-vote requirement.

Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Debra Todd (D) wrote the court’s opinion. She described the ballot measure as “a collection of amendments which added a multiplicity of new rights to our Constitution.” Justice Todd added, “… because those new rights were not interrelated in purpose and function, the manner in which it was presented to the voters denied them their right to consider and vote on each change separately.” Justice Sallie Mundy (R) dissented, writing that the constitutional amendment had a “singular common objective of establishing for victims of crime justice and due process in the criminal and juvenile justice systems.”

Marsy’s Law is a set of constitutional protections for crime victims that have been proposed and adopted in 12 states. The effort to institute Marsy’s Law across the U.S. has been primarily backed by Henry Nicholas, co-founder of Broadcom Corporation. In 2009, Henry founded Marsy’s Law for All LLC, the national organization advocating for Marsy’s Law. In Pennsylvania, Marsy’s Law for All spent $6.85 million advocating for the constitutional amendment. 

The Pennsylvania Marsy’s Law Crime Victims Rights Amendment would have added a section addressing crime victims’ rights to the Pennsylvania Constitution Declaration of Rights. The ballot measure would have provided crime victims with 15 specific constitutional rights, including a right to proceedings free from unreasonable delay and a prompt and final conclusion of the case; a right to provide information to be considered before the parole of the offender; and a right to refuse an interview, deposition or other discovery request made by the accused. The ballot measure would have defined a crime victim as any person against whom a criminal offense or delinquent act was committed or who was directly harmed by the offense or act.

The constitutional amendment had the support of Gov. Tom Wolf (D), U.S. Sen. Bob Casey (D), and U.S. Reps. Scott Perry (R-10) and Fred Keller (R-12), and the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association. The ACLU of Pennsylvania, League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania, and Pennsylvania Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers opposed the ballot measure.

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Pennsylvania House passes five constitutional amendments; bill heads back to state Senate

The Pennsylvania House of Representatives approved a bill that contains five constitutional amendments, which voters would decide as distinct ballot measures, on Dec. 15. In April, the state Senate approved the bill as a single constitutional amendment. Since the House changed the bill to include more constitutional amendments, the bill returns to the Senate for final first-session approval during the 2021-2022 legislative session. Topics include the lieutenant governor election, executive order time limits, legislative disapproval of regulations, election audits, and voter identification.

In Pennsylvania, constitutional amendments require legislative approval during two successive legislative sessions. The legislation would need to be approved again during the 2023-2024 legislative session before voters would decide the changes. The earliest possible date for the amendments is the spring municipal elections on May 16, 2023.

The original version of the bill was a constitutional amendment to allow a political party’s candidate for governor to choose their own candidate for lieutenant governor. Currently, a party’s nominees for governor and lieutenant governor run on a joint ticket during the general election but in separate primaries. On April 27, 2021, the Senate voted 43-4 to pass the bill. The four votes against the amendment were two Democrats and two Republicans. 

On Dec. 14, the House voted to add the four additional constitutional amendments to the bill. The lieutenant governor amendment also received a grammatical change. Votes on two amendments were along party lines, with all 113 Republicans supporting and all 90 Democrats opposing. On the other two amendments, one Democrat joined Republicans in supporting the changes. Along with the lieutenant governor amendment, the amended bill includes:

  • a constitutional amendment to provide that executive orders and proclamations with the force and effect of law cannot last more than 21 days without legislative approval; 
  • a constitutional amendment to allow the legislature to pass a resolution, which the governor cannot veto, by a simple majority to disapprove regulations;
  • a constitutional amendment to require election audits, including elections administration, election machine certification, the list of registered voters, and election results; and
  • a constitutional amendment to require voter identification, regardless of the voting method.

In the 50-seat Senate, Democrats hold 21 seats, Republicans hold 28 seats, and an independent holds one seat.

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Welby wins Pennsylvania House 113 in Nov. 2 special election

A special general was held for the Pennsylvania House of Representatives District 113 on Nov. 2. Thom Welby (D) won the special election with 9,191 votes, defeating Dominick Manetti (R) and Bonnie Flaherty (L). 

The candidate filing deadline passed on Sept. 13.

The special election was called after Martin Flynn (D) won a special election for state Senate District 22 on May 18. Flynn represented District 113 from 2012 to 2021. 

As of Nov. 5, Pennsylvania has held six state legislative special elections in 2021. Special elections for Senate Districts 22 and 48 and House Districts 59 and 60 were held on May 18. A special election was also held for House District 164 on Nov. 2. Pennsylvania held five state legislative special elections in 2020. 

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Kevin Brobson (R) defeats Maria McLaughlin (D) in Pennsylvania Supreme Court election

Kevin Brobson (R) defeated Maria McLaughlin (D) in the general election for a seat on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. As of 3:00 a.m. EST, The New York Times reported that Brobson had received 52.6% of the vote to McLaughlin’s 47.4%.

Justice Thomas Saylor (R), who joined the court in 1998, did not run for another term because he turned 75 in 2021. Pennsylvania judges must retire at the end of the calendar year in which they reach 75 years of age.

At the time of the election, five judges on the court were elected in partisan elections as Democrats, and two were elected as Republicans. Since Brobson won, the court’s partisan composition will remain the same.

After 2021, the next scheduled election for a seat on the court is in 2022, as current chief justice Max Baer (D) will reach the mandatory retirement age of 75 that year. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court is the state’s court of last resort and has seven judgeships. To read more about Pennsylvania’s 2021 Supreme Court election, click here.