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The Ballot Bulletin: October 5, 2022

Welcome to The Ballot Bulletin, where we track developments in election policy at the federal, state, and local levels. In this month’s issue:

  1. Delaware state court strikes down law allowing no-excuse absentee/mail-in voting
  2. California enacts three election-related bills
  3. Legislation update: Legislation activity in September 2022

Have a question/feedback/or just want to say hello? Respond to this email, or drop me a line directly at Jerrick@Ballotpedia.org.


Delaware state court strikes down law allowing no-excuse absentee/mail-in voting

On Sept. 14, Vice Chancellor Nathan Cook, of the Delaware Court of Chancery, ruled that a state law allowing any registered voter to vote by absentee/mail-in ballot was unconstitutional. However, on Sept. 19, Cook delayed implementation of his ruling, pending an expedited appeal to the state supreme court. 

The law in question

On July 22, Gov. John Carney (D) signed SB320 into law, establishing no-excuse absentee/mail-in voting in any non-presidential primary election, general election, or special election to fill a vacancy in a statewide office or the General Assembly. The state Senate approved the bill 13-8 on June 16, with 13 Democrats voting in favor and one Democrat and seven Republicans opposed. The state House approved the bill 25-12 on June 29, with 24 Democrats and one Republican voting in favor and 12 Republicans opposed. The bill took retroactive effect on July 1.

Article V, Section 4A, of the state constitution states:

The General Assembly shall enact general laws providing that any qualified elector of this State, duly registered, who shall be unable to appear to cast his or her ballot at any general election at the regular polling place of the election district in which he or she is registered, either because of being in the public service of the United States or of this State, or his or her spouse or dependents when residing with or accompanying him or her because of the nature of his or her business or occupation, because of his or her sickness or physical disability, because of his or her absence from the district while on vacation, or because of the tenets or teachings of his or her religion, may cast a ballot at such general election to be counted in such election district.

The parties to the lawsuit and their arguments

The plaintiffs are five registered voters: Michael Higgin (who is also a Republican candidate for Delaware House District 15), Michael Mennella (who plans to serve as an election inspector in the Nov. 8 general election), Ayonne Miles, Paul Falkowski, and Nancy Smith. The defendants are Delaware State Election Commissioner Anthony J. Albence and the Delaware Department of Elections. 

The plaintiffs, arguing that SB320 is “irreconcilable with the Delaware Constitution,” asked the court to declare the law unconstitutional and bar its enforcement in the Nov. 8 general election. 

The defendants argued the plaintiffs lacked standing to challenge SB320. The defendants further argued that SB320 was constitutional. 

How the court ruled

Cook ruled:

  • The plaintiffs had standing to challenge SB320. Cook wrote, “[A]lthough the plaintiffs likely would not have standing under federal jurisprudence, I conclude that the plaintiffs have standing to challenge the Vote-by-Mail Statute under state law. … In this case, the plaintiffs represent various parts of the election process, and I conclude they have a substantial interest in this court reaching a decision on the merits, particularly given the fundamental nature of voting.” 
  • SB320 violates the state constitution: Cook wrote, “The plaintiffs argue that Article V, Section 4A, of the Delaware Constitution … provides for absentee voting in certain enumerated circumstances. Our Supreme Court and this Court have consistently stated that those circumstances are exhaustive. Therefore, as a trial judge, I am compelled by precedent to conclude that the Vote-by-Mail Statute’s attempt to expand absentee voting to Delawareans who do not align with any of Section 4A’s categories must be rejected.” 

Cook concluded an injunction (i.e., an order barring the state from enforcing SB320) was appropriate because “there would be irreparable harm in the absence of injunctive relief and … the balance of the equities favors entry of an injunction.” 

What comes next

On Sept. 19, Cook stayed enforcement of his ruling, pending an expedited appeal to the state supreme court, which was scheduled to hear oral argument in the case on Oct. 5. 


California enacts three election-related bills

In September, California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) signed three election-related bills into law.

  • AB1631: Existing law requires elections officials to make public a list of the precincts to which precinct officials who are fluent in a non-English language and in English were appointed, and the language or languages other than English in which the officials will provide assistance. This bill requires the county elections official to make this list available on the county elections official’s website.
  • AB2815: This bill requires a county, for a statewide primary or general election, to provide an additional vote-by-mail ballot drop-off location on each California State University main campus within its jurisdiction and, upon request, each University of California campus within its jurisdiction.
  • SB1131: Existing law requires an election official to post a list of all polling places and precinct board members at specified times before an election. This bill would eliminate the requirement to post the names of the precinct board members, but would still require the election official to post the political party preference for all precinct board members, as specified.

Legislation update: Legislation activity in September 2022

In September, legislatures in five states and the District of Columbia took action on 36 election bills. 

The chart below identifies the 10 most common policy areas implicated by the bills that state lawmakers acted on in September. The number listed on the blue portion of each bar indicates the number of Democratic-sponsored bills dealing with the subject in question. The number listed on the red portion of the bar indicates the number of Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions of the bar indicate the number of bipartisan-sponsored bills and bills with unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Note that the total number of bills listed will not equal the total number of enacted bills because some bills deal with multiple subjects.

Democrats sponsored 21 of the 36 bills acted on in September (58.3%). Republicans sponsored 7 (19.4%). Bipartisan groups sponsored eight (22.2%). 

This information comes from Ballotpedia’s Election Administration Legislation Tracker, which went live on June 29. This free and accessible online resource allows you to find easy-to-digest bill tags and summaries—written and curated by our election administration experts! We update our database and bill-tracking daily. Using our powerful interactive search function, you can zero in on more 2,500 bills (and counting) covering these topics:

  • Absentee/mail-in voting and early voting policies
  • Ballot access requirements for candidates, parties, and ballot initiatives
  • Election dates and deadlines
  • Election oversight protocols
  • In-person voting procedures
  • Post-election procedures (including counting, canvassing, and auditing policies)
  • Voter ID
  • Voter registration and eligibility

To make your search results more precise, we first place bills into one of 22 parent categories. We then apply to each bill one or more of the 88 tags we’ve developed. 

If you don’t want to immerse yourself in the world of election legislation quite that often, we have a free, weekly digest that goes straight to your inbox and keeps you caught up on the week’s developments.




All candidates for Texas House of Representatives District 19 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Texas House of Representatives District 19 — Pam Baggett (D) and Ellen Troxclair (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Texas’s state legislature. Texas is one of 23 states with a Republican party trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Baggett:           

  • “Demand we accept our federal tax dollars by accepting Medicaid expansion. A healthy Texas is a prosperous Texas.”
  • “We have a seemingly endless list if ways to improve Texas school. A brief list includes: *Offer competitive salaries for teachers. *Return $5 billion in covid education relief from the general fund back to schools. *Eliminate high stakes testing.”
  • “We all love the Hill Country and more and more people are loving it, too. We must balance this growth by protecting water quantity and quality, protecting the hills we love from being dug out, and protecting air quality near stone processing.”

Troxclair:       

  • “On the City Council, I became known as the budget watchdog, consistently cutting wasteful spending and reforming city programs for better results.”
  • “I am a pro-life champion, who will defend the Texas heartbeat bill outlawing any abortion when a heartbeat is detected.”
  • “As a small business owner, I know that small businesses are the heart of our economy. I will help support local businesses to help get them back on track.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Texas House of Representatives elections, 2022



All candidates for Northeast Division judge of King County District Court in Washington complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Northeast Division judge of King County District Court in Washington — incumbent Michael Finkle and Joshua Schaer — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the King County website, the “King County District Court is one of the busiest courts in Washington state, and is a leader in many areas involving public safety and access to justice.” The court is responsible for hearing cases related to civil litigation matters up to $100,000 per claimant, small claims matters up to $10,000, and nuisance violations, among others.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Finkle:                   

  • “There is more to being a judge than making decisions in Court. An excellent judge should improve the court system. I have a demonstrated history, as recently as June of 2022, of successfully doing just that.”
  • “Improvements to the court system don’t happen by chance. They require advance planning. I have plans in mind for changes over the next 1-4 years, including how to carry out those changes.”
  • “Some of the biggest steps in providing access to justice for all involve very small gestures. Because of my experience as a judge, I am aware of those small gestures and I have been using them over the years.”

Schaer:           

  • “As a King County District Court Judge, Joshua Schaer will reduce backlogged dockets and guide individuals to improve their lives through community-based services while holding repeat offenders accountable.”
  • “Joshua Schaer’s colleagues in the Attorney General’s Office and nonpartisan endorsers know his good character, attention to detail, and thoughtful consideration of important issues.”
  • “Joshua Schaer will encourage legislators to continue budgetary support for court programs that benefit disadvantaged individuals. Additionally, he will advocate for greater funding toward legal aid and mediation services that can assist litigants in civil cases.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

King County Municipal elections, 2022



All candidates for Wyoming House of Representatives District 17 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Wyoming House of Representatives District 17 — incumbent Chad Banks (D) and J.T. Larson (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Wyoming’s state legislature. Wyoming is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Banks:                   

  • “Supporting Small Businesses – Small businesses are the lifeblood of our community and our state. We need to expand programs to help our small businesses thrive and grow.”
  • “Expanding Healthcare – Wyoming needs to expand Medicaid to help the most vulnerable in our community. Additionally we need to shore up our existing services in the state.”
  • “Representing the underrepresented – Right now we’re seeing more and more attacks on some of the most vulnerable populations in our communities and state.”

Larson:               

  • “I am pro second amendment and I will do everything I can to protect your rights.”
  • “Economic Development/Diversification are vital to the growth of Rock Springs and Sweetwater County.”
  • “Protecting the water rights of the people of Sweetwater County is a huge priority not only today but for the future.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Wyoming House of Representatives elections, 2022



All candidates for Kansas House of Representatives District 86 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Kansas House of Representatives District 86 — Silas Miller (D) and Rick Lindsey (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Kansas’s state legislature. Kansas is one of 13 states with a divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Miller:       

  • “Silas is determined to reduce the tax burden on working-class families and help create an economy that benefits everyone by raising wages, better housing opportunities, and supporting job training and workforce development.”
  • “Silas will work toward solutions for the education system in Kansas. We need to pay teachers more, and restore their due-process rights.”
  • “Silas will fight for environmental protection and reducing human-influenced climate change.”

Lindsey:                   

  • “Economics – we must make Kansas as affordable as possible in these inflationary times.”
  • “Education – At the top of my priorities is ensuring students get the same quality education regardless of physical address.”
  • “Fund essential services – Make sure healthcare options are available for all without relying on Feds. for delivery of services. Control costs where possible!”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Kansas House of Representatives elections, 2022



All candidates for Washington House of Representatives District 19 – Position 1 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Washington House of Representatives District 19-Position 1  — incumbent Jim Walsh (R) and Kelli Hughes-Ham (D)  — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Washington’s state legislature. Washington is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?                

Walsh:           

  • “Restore balanced, constitutional government in Olympia.”
  • “Return the ability to chase criminal suspects and fight crime to our law enforcement agencies.”
  • “Give the people of Washington reasonable tax relief: especially property, sales and fuel tax relief.”

Hughes-Ham:       

  • “We deserve a representative who will actively fight for engaging, relevant public education, fully-funded and accessible to all.”
  • “We deserve a representative who fights for strong local industry that utilizes realistic climate solutions.”
  • “We deserve a representative who fights for safe, inclusive communities with ample, affordable housing.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Washington House of Representatives election, 2022



Help make neutral, nonpartisan election information free for all: Join the Ballotpedia Society today!

Welcome to the Wednesday, October 5, Brew. 

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Ballotpedia needs you! Join the Ballotpedia Society to promote our mission of free access to unbiased election information
  2. President Joe Biden’s approval rating rises to 43% in September, highest since January
  3. Kansas has only gubernatorial election with a Democratic incumbent running in a state that Donald Trump (R) won in 2020 

Ballotpedia needs you! Join the Ballotpedia Society to promote our mission of free access to unbiased election information

Election Day is barely a month away. And voters are looking for the information they need to understand who and what is on their ballot. 


But for many of them, there’s just not enough information available for them to make informed, confident decisions.

It’s a huge problem, which is why we’re asking you to join the Ballotpedia Society right away to help solve it.

Last year, more than 48 million people turned to Ballotpedia for information on politics and policy. And that was in an electoral “off year,” too! You can bet that even more will visit in 2022 and 2024. 

This rapid growth has made Ballotpedia the Encyclopedia of American politics. But we won’t be able to offer comprehensive coverage of all the races, policy issues, and concepts without YOUR help.

When you become a Ballotpedia Society member, you will be providing Ballotpedia with stable funding to ensure our work can continue without interruption.  

Election Day is right around the corner. Don’t delay!

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President Joe Biden’s approval rating rises to 43% in September, highest since January

Approval polls show President Joe Biden (D) at an average 43% approval at the end of September, the highest rating he’s received since January. Fifty-three percent of voters disapprove of his performance.

Biden last had a 43% approval rating on Jan. 12, 2022. The lowest approval rating he’s received was 38% on July 27, 2022. Biden’s highest approval rating was 55% on May 26, 2021.

Congress was at 28% approval and 61% disapproval at the end of September. The highest approval rating Congress has received during Biden’s term was 36% on July 16, 2021, and the lowest approval rating was 14% on Jan. 26, 2022.

At the end of September 2018, during the Trump administration, presidential approval was three percentage points lower at 40%, and congressional approval was nine percentage points lower at 17%.

Ballotpedia’s polling index takes the average of polls conducted over the last 30 days to calculate presidential and congressional approval ratings. We average the results and show all polling results side-by-side because we believe that paints a clearer picture of public opinion than any individual poll can provide. The data is updated daily as new polling results are published.

Keep reading 

Kansas has only gubernatorial election with a Democratic incumbent running in a state that Donald Trump (R) won in 2020 

Today is the 27th day of our 50 States in 50 days series, and we’re featuring Kansas, the Sunflower State.

Week One: Pennsylvania, Indiana, South Dakota, Nebraska, North Dakota
Week Two: California, Georgia, Texas, Montana
Week Three: North Carolina, Virginia, New Mexico, Illinois, Idaho
Week Four: Kentucky, Michigan, Arkansas, Minnesota, West Virginia
Week Five: Vermont, Nevada, Wyoming, Arizona, Ohio
Week Six: South Carolina, Iowa

On the ballot in Kansas

Kansas will hold elections for one U.S. Senate seat and four U.S. House seats in 2022. Incumbent Senator Jerry Moran (R) is seeking re-election, along with three Republican incumbents and one Democratic incumbent in the House.

Voters will have several state executive elections on their ballot this year, including elections for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, secretary of state, treasurer, and insurance commissioner. Five of the 10 seats on the Kansas State Board of Education will also be up for election this year.

All 125 seats in the Kansas House of Representatives are up for election. Twenty-three of those seats are open. Kansas state senators are elected to four-year terms, so all 40 seats in that chamber will be up for election in 2024.

Six of the seven justices on the Kansas Supreme Court are up for retention elections this year. A retention election is a type of election where voters are asked whether an incumbent judge should remain in office for another term. The judge, who does not face an opponent, is removed if a majority of voters decide against retention. 

Redistricting highlights

Kansas was apportioned four seats in the U.S. House of Representatives after the 2020 census, the same as it had after the 2010 census.

Congressional and state legislative elections will take place under new district lines following the census. Our side-by-side map comparison tool allows you to immediately see what redistricting looks like in your state. Here are the congressional maps in effect before and after the 2020 redistricting cycle in Kansas:

To use our tool to view Kansas’ state legislative maps in effect before and after the 2020 redistricting cycle, visit our Kansas redistricting page

Partisan balance

Both of Kansas’ U.S. Senators are Republicans. Three of Kansas’ representatives in the U.S. House are Republicans, and one is a Democrat.

The Kansas Senate is made up of 11 Democrats and 29 Republicans. The Kansas House of Representatives is made up of 38 Democrats and 86 Republicans, with one vacancy. Kansas is one of 13 states with a divided government. Kansas’ trifecta status last changed in 2019, when Governor Laura Kelly (D) assumed office. The state was a Republican trifecta before Kelly’s election.

Kansas has a Republican attorney general and secretary of state, meaning the state’s triplex status is also divided.

Seats contested by only one major party

In 2022, 65 state legislative seats in Kansas, or 52% of all seats up for election, do not have major party competition. When a candidate from only one of either the Democratic or Republican parties runs in a state legislative district, that party is all but guaranteed to win.

Democrats are running in 63% of all state legislative races. Forty-six state legislative districts (37% of the total) do not have a Democratic candidate, meaning a Republican is likely to win.

Republicans are running in 85% of all state legislative races. Nineteen districts (15% of the total) do not feature a Republican candidate, meaning a Democrat is likely to win. 

Key races

  • Kansas gubernatorial and lieutenant gubernatorial election, 2022: One-term incumbent Laura Kelly (D) is running for re-election against Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt (R) and two other candidates. This is the only governorship Democrats are defending in 2022 in a state that Donald Trump (R) won in 2020.
  • Kansas’ 3rd Congressional District election, 2022: Incumbent Rep. Sharice Davids (D), Amanda Adkins (R), and Steve Hohe (L) are running. This is a rematch of the 2020 general election when Davids defeated Adkins 53.6% to 43.6%. The Cook Political Report’s PVI (Partisan Voter Index) for the old district was D+2, while the score for the redrawn district is R+1.
  • Kansas Treasurer election, 2022: Incumbent Lynn Rogers (D), Steven C. Johnson (R), and Steve Roberts (L) are running. Kelly appointed Rogers to the office in 2020 after former incumbent Jacob LaTurner (R) resigned to serve in the U.S. House.

Ballot measures

Kansas voters will decide two statewide measures on Nov. 8:

Kansas voters decided one statewide measure on August 2, 2022: the No State Constitutional Right to Abortion and Legislative Power to Regulate Abortion Amendment, which would have amended the Kansas Constitution to state that there is no right to an abortion or public abortion funding. The measure was defeated 59% to 41%.

Twenty ballot measures appeared on statewide ballots between 1985 and 2020. Fifteen ballot measures were approved, and five ballot measures were defeated.

Voting

  • On Election Day, polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central Time. If the polls close while a voter is in line, he or she will still be permitted to vote.
  • Kansas requires voters to present photo identification while voting. Forms of accepted ID include a driver’s license, a concealed carry of handgun license, a passport, or a United States military identification document, among others. For a full list of accepted voter IDs in Kansas, click here.
  • Early voting is available to all voters. It begins on Oct. 19 and ends on Nov. 7.
  • Kansas’ voter registration deadline is Oct. 18 for in-person, by-mail, and online registration. Kansas does not allow same-day voter registration.
  • All voters are eligible to vote absentee in Kansas. Kansas refers to absentee voting as “advance voting.” An absentee ballot application must be received by Nov. 1. Absentee ballots can be returned in-person by the time polls close on election day. If returned by mail, the ballot must be postmarked by Nov. 8. To check the status of your ballot, click here.

Want to learn more about the elections you’ll be voting in this year? Click here to use our Sample Ballot Lookup tool! 

Keep reading



Three candidates running for Kansas state treasurer on Nov. 8

Incumbent Lynn Rogers (D), Steven C. Johnson (R), and Steve Roberts (L) are running for Kansas treasurer on Nov. 8, 2022. Rogers and Johnson have led in fundraising and media attention.

Gov. Laura Kelly (D) appointed Rogers Kansas treasurer in 2020, and he assumed office in Jan. 2021. He was the lieutenant governor of Kansas from 2019 to 2021 and represented Kansas State Senate District 25 from 2016 to 2019. Rogers’ career experience includes working as an agriculture banker. Rogers described himself as “a commonsense leader who has a passion for education and improving the lives of average Kansas families” and said he had “a proven track record of working to solve problems for Kansans by finding bipartisan solutions.” Rogers emphasized his experience managing the Kansas Public Employees Retirement System (KPERS), saying, “We put $1.8 million back to our beneficiaries and we want to make sure that we continue to do that.”

Johnson has represented Kansas House of Representatives District 108 since 2010. His professional experience includes working for Ameriprise, a financial services firm, and agricultural nonprofits the K-State Foundation and the Kansas 4-H Foundation. On Johnson’s campaign website, he emphasized government efficiency, saying, “I’m always looking for ways to increase efficiency and eliminate waste. As Treasurer I’ll look out for taxpayers and work hard to stop wasteful government spending.” Johnson also said “eliminating woke ESG investment strategies” was one of his top priorities because “ESG funds only invest in companies based on their environmental and corporate policies, making returns on investment a secondary concern.”

In the 2018 election, Jacob LaTurner (R) defeated Marci Francisco (D) 57.7%-42.3%. LaTurner left office after being elected to represent Kansas’ 2nd Congressional District in 2020. Before Rogers, the last Democratic state treasurer in Kansas was Dennis McKinney (D), who served from 2009-2011.

According to the official website, the treasurer “ensures safe and efficient operation of state government through effective banking, investment, and cash management. In short, the State Treasurer is the Chief Banker of the State.” The treasurer is also a board trustee of the Kansas Public Employees Retirement System, a member of the Pooled Money Investment Board, and a member of the Committee on Surety Bonds and Insurance.



San Francisco voters to decide 14 local ballot measures on November 8

Voters in San Francisco will decide 14 local ballot measures on November 8. Four measures are citizen initiatives and ten were referred to the ballot by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. The measures address topics such as the ability to use vehicles in the JFK Promenade, parking in Golden Gate Park, expediting housing projects, moving city elections to even-numbered years, and more.

Summaries of the measures are below:

Proposition A: Allows city employees who retired before November 6, 1996, to receive a supplemental cost of living adjustment to their pensions whether or not the retirement system is fully funded and allows the Retirement Board to enter into an individual employment contract with its executive director

Proposition B: Eliminates the Department of Sanitation and Streets and transfers its duties to the Department of Public Works and retains the Public Works Commission and the Sanitation and Streets Commission

Proposition C: Creates a Homelessness Oversight Commission to oversee the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing and requires the city controller to conduct audits of services for people experiencing homelessness

Proposition D: Expedites the approval of certain housing projects and removes the Board of Supervisors’ approval as a requirement for certain housing projects using city property or city financing

Proposition E: Expedites the approval of certain housing projects and continues requiring the Board of Supervisors’ approval for affordable housing projects using city property or city financing

Proposition F: Renews the Library Preservation Fund for 25 years, allows the city to temporarily freeze the annual minimum library funding amount when the city expects a budget deficit over $300 million, and increases the minimum hours the main library and its 27 branches must be open per week

Proposition G: Creates the Student Success Fund to provide additional grants to San Francisco Unified School District through 2038, with the city allocating $11 million to the Fund in 2024, $35 million in 2025, and $45 million in 2026

Proposition H: Changes elections for mayor, sheriff, district attorney, city attorney, and treasurer from odd-numbered years to even-numbered years (in November of presidential election years) and changes signature requirements for ballot initiatives from 5% of votes cast for the mayor to 2% of registered voters

Proposition I: Allows private motor vehicles on John F. Kennedy Drive and connector streets except from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sundays and legal holidays as well as on Saturdays from April through September

Proposition J: Upholds an ordinance adopted in May 2022 closing portions of John F. Kennedy Drive and certain connector streets in Golden Gate Park to use the area as open recreation spaces

Proposition L: Continues an existing one-half cent sales tax through 2053 for transportation project funding and allows the Transportation Authority to issue up to $1.91 billion in bonds for transportation projects

Proposition M: Allows the city to levy a tax on owners of vacant residential units in buildings with three or more units if the units have been vacant for more than 182 days in a year, at a rate between $2,500–5,000 per vacant unit, continuing through 2053, and dedicating tax revenue for rent subsidies and certain housing entities

Proposition N: Allows the city to use public funds to acquire, operate, or subsidize public parking in the underground parking garage in Golden Gate Park, dissolves the Golden Gate Park Concourse Authority, and transfers management of the garage to the Recreation and Park Commission

Proposition O: Levies a parcel tax at varying rates between $150–4,000 per parcel, beginning on July 1, 2023, and ending on June 30, 2043, with funding appropriated to the City College of San Francisco for student and workforce development programs

Proposition K, a proposed citizen initiative sponsored by the Tenants and Owners Development Corporation (TODCO), was removed from the ballot in a Superior Court ruling at the request of proponents. Sponsors referred to the measure as the Tax Amazon for Guaranteed Income proposition and designed it to levy a tax on e-commerce corporations making $2.5 million or more from online sales. John Eberling of TODCO said, “We are very strongly committed to taxing wealth and taxing the corporate greed that is going on in America and Amazon is one of the very worst. We heard they were putting out word that they wouldn’t be subject to the tax increase and that obviously was not the idea. After we heard that this was going to apply to small businesses to an extent that we did not intend, and because we were concerned Amazon was going to slip away, we thought it was better to pull it away and re-draft it so it’s airtight with regard to companies like Amazon.”

In 2022, Ballotpedia is covering local ballot measures that appear on the ballot for voters within the 100 largest cities in the U.S., within state capitals, and throughout California. You can review the coverage scope of the local ballot measures project here.

Seven statewide ballot propositions are on the statewide ballot in California. The state legislature voted to refer a constitutional amendment to provide a right to reproductive freedom to the ballot. Six citizen-initiated measures qualified for the ballot related to sports betting, K-12 art and music education funding, dialysis clinic requirements, income tax to fund zero-emission vehicle projects, and a flavored tobacco products ban.

Additional reading:



Three candidates running for Missouri state auditor in November

Alan Green (D), Scott Fitzpatrick (R), and John Hartwig (L) are running for Missouri state auditor on Nov. 8, 2022. Green and Fitzpatrick have led in fundraising and polling. Incumbent Nicole Galloway (D) announced in June 2021 that she would not seek re-election.

Green was a member of the Missouri House of Representatives, representing District 67 from 2014 to 2021. He served as director of the Missouri Office of Equal Opportunity and advisor to two St. Louis County officials. Green also worked as a police officer, CFO, and minister. On his campaign website, Green emphasized whistleblower protection and transparency, saying, “I will advocate for stronger legislation to protect and stand up for whistleblowers” and “[w]ork to make sure that all allocated public dollars are used for the purposes and areas intended instead of being diverted for pet projects.”

Alan Green (D), Scott Fitzpatrick (R), and John Hartwig (L) are running for Missouri state auditor on Nov. 8, 2022. Green and Fitzpatrick have led in fundraising and polling. Incumbent Nicole Galloway (D) announced in June 2021 that she would not seek re-election.

Green was a member of the Missouri House of Representatives, representing District 67 from 2014 to 2021. He served as director of the Missouri Office of Equal Opportunity and advisor to two St. Louis County officials. Green also worked as a police officer, CFO, and minister. On his campaign website, Green emphasized whistleblower protection and transparency, saying, “I will advocate for stronger legislation to protect and stand up for whistleblowers” and “[w]ork to make sure that all allocated public dollars are used for the purposes and areas intended instead of being diverted for pet projects.”

Fitzpatrick was elected Missouri treasurer in 2019 and was a member of the Missouri House of Representatives, representing District 158 from 2013 to 2019. His professional experience included founding and operating MariCorp United States. Fitzpatrick focused on issues of government waste and corruption, saying, “Where waste, fraud, and abuse occur, I will find it and root it out,” and “you can trust me to give you the facts, fight for reforms wherever they are needed, and not cave to pressure from lobbyists or special interest groups when those facts show they are benefiting from sweetheart deals at your expense.”

At the time of the election, the auditor was the only statewide office held by a Democrat.

The office of state auditor acts as Missouri’s independent oversight agency, working to ensure the proper use of public funds and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of Missouri government. This is achieved through auditing of state agencies, boards and commissions, the circuit court system, the counties in Missouri that do not have a county auditor and other political subdivisions upon request.

Fitzpatrick was elected Missouri treasurer in 2019 and was a member of the Missouri House of Representatives, representing District 158 from 2013 to 2019. His professional experience included founding and operating MariCorp United States. Fitzpatrick focused on issues of government waste and corruption, saying, “Where waste, fraud, and abuse occur, I will find it and root it out,” and “you can trust me to give you the facts, fight for reforms wherever they are needed, and not cave to pressure from lobbyists or special interest groups when those facts show they are benefiting from sweetheart deals at your expense.”

At the time of the election, the auditor was the only statewide office held by a Democrat. Galloway was appointed state auditor by Gov. Jay Nixon (D) on April 14, 2015, and took office April 27. She was re-elected in 2018, when she defeated Republican incumbent 50.4%-44.6%.

The Office of state auditor acts as Missouri’s independent oversight agency, working to ensure the proper use of public funds and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of Missouri government. This is achieved through auditing of state agencies, boards and commissions, the circuit court system, the counties in Missouri that do not have a county auditor and other political subdivisions upon request.