Daily Brew Volume #4 – 50 states in 25 days

The Daily Brew
Welcome to the Thursday, Oct. 1, Brew. Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Comparing stances: Noteworthy presidential candidates on abortion
  2. Explore Illinois elections
  3. Explore Ohio elections

Comparing stances: Noteworthy presidential candidates on abortion

In this week’s feature comparing the four noteworthy presidential candidates’ stances on key issues, we’re looking at what the candidates say about abortion. As a reminder, to be considered noteworthy in the general election, candidates must appear on enough ballots to win a majority of the Electoral College.

In the past few weeks, we’ve also briefed our Brew readers on the candidates’ stances on ChinaDACA and Dreamerspolicing, and coronavirus recovery.

Joe Biden (D)

Joe Biden’s campaign website states, “As president, Biden will work to codify Roe v. Wade, and his Justice Department will do everything in its power to stop the rash of state laws that so blatantly violate the constitutional right to an abortion, such as so-called TRAP laws, parental notification requirements, mandatory waiting periods, and ultrasound requirements. Biden will reissue guidance specifying that states cannot refuse Medicaid funding for Planned Parenthood and other providers that refer for abortions or provide related information and reverse the Trump Administration’s rule preventing Planned Parenthood and certain other family planning programs from obtaining Title X funds. Biden will rescind the Mexico City Policy (also referred to as the global gag rule) that President Trump reinstated and expanded.”

Howie Hawkins (G)

Howie Hawkins’ campaign website states, “I support the legal framework established in the Roe v. Wade decision. During the first trimester, it is up to the pregnant woman to decide whether to get an abortion. During the second trimester laws can only regulate abortion to protect the health of the mother. During the third trimester, or after fetal viability pursuant to Planned Parenthood v. Casey (1992), laws can restrict or prohibit abortions except in cases where it was necessary to protect the mother’s health. This framework should be codified into federal law by an act of Congress. I oppose targeted regulation of abortion clinics and providers through laws or policies that go beyond what is necessary to ensure patients’ safety. I support laws that allow physicians as well as non-physician health professionals, including physicians’ assistants, nurse practitioners, and certified nurse midwives, to perform abortion procedures.

Jo Jorgensen (L)

Jo Jorgensen’s campaign website states, “Keep the government out of it, no subsidies, no regulations.”

Donald Trump (R) 

Donald Trump’s campaign website states, “The President has kept the promises he made in 2016 to the pro-life community and has delivered unprecedented victories for the pro-life movement: He took executive action to stop taxpayer money from flowing to Planned Parenthood, the largest abortion business in the country. He reinstated and expanded the ban on Americans’ tax dollars paying for abortions in foreign countries. He is standing with the Catholic nuns known as the Little Sisters of the Poor, defending them from Obama-era regulations forcing them to violate their religious beliefs by providing health insurance that covers abortifacients.”

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Explore Illinois elections

Let’s continue on our 50 States in 25 Days series, where we feature what to know about two states in each Brew issue leading up to Nov. 3. Here are the states we’ve highlighted so far:

We’re going in order of when states held their primaries, so up next is Illinois and Ohio.

On the ballot in Illinois

At the federal level, Illinois voters will elect 20 presidential electors, one U.S. Senator, and 18 U.S. Representatives. Both chambers of the state legislature are on the ballot, with 20 out of 59 seats up in the state Senate and all 118 House districts. Two state legislative special elections are also on the ballot. Three seats on the state supreme court and 10 seats on the intermediate appellate court are on the ballot. Voters will also decide on one statewide ballot measure. Ballotpedia is tracking local elections taking place in Cook County and local ballot measures in DuPage County.

Partisan data

  • In 2016, Hillary Clinton (D) defeated Donald Trump (R) 56% to 39% in Illinois. Democratic candidates have won Illinois in each of the last seven presidential elections. In the six elections before that streak, the Republican candidate won each year.
  • With 11 Pivot Counties, Illinois is one of 34 states with counties that voted for Barack Obama (D) in 2008 and 2012, then voted for Donald Trump (R) in 2016.
  • Both of Illinois’ U.S. Senators—Tammy Duckworth and Dick Durbin—are Democrats.
  • Democrats represent 13 of the state’s U.S. House districts and Republicans represent five.
  • Illinois’ governor, attorney general, and secretary of state are all Democrats, meaning it is one of 17 states with a Democratic triplex. It has held this status since 2019.
  • Democrats have a 39-19 majority in the state Senate and a 73-44 majority in the state House. Because the governor is also a Democrat, Illinois is one of 15 states with a Democratic trifecta. Democrats gained a trifecta after Gov. J.B. Pritzker (D) won the 2018 gubernatorial election.

Battleground races

Here is one battleground election in Illinois this year:

Ballot measures

  • Illinois voters will decide one statewide ballot measure on Nov. 3.
  • The Illinois Legislature referred a constitutional amendment to the ballot that would allow the state to enact a graduated income tax. Currently, the state constitution mandates a flat personal income tax rate. In June 2019, Gov. Pritzker signed Senate Bill 687, which would change the state’s 4.95% flat rate to six graduated rates ranging from 4.75% to 7.99% if voters approve the constitutional amendment.
    • Campaigns supporting the measure have reported $58.9 million in fundraising. Campaigns opposing the measure reported raising $21.6 million.

Voting

  • In response to the coronavirus pandemic, Illinois is automatically sending absentee/mail-in ballot applications for the general election to all voters who cast ballots in the 2018 general, 2019 consolidated, or 2020 primary elections.
  • Illinois does not require witnesses or notaries to sign their absentee/mail-in ballot documents.
  • Absentee/mail-in ballots can be returned in person or by mail. A ballot returned in person must be received by 7 p.m. on Nov. 3. A ballot returned by mail must be postmarked on or before Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 17.
  • Illinois election law states that votes can be counted starting on Nov. 3 at 7:00 p.m.
  • In 2018, mail-in ballots were 9.0% of the total votes cast.
  • Illinois does not require all voters to present ID at the polls. Select voters, however, may be required to present ID at the polls (e.g., first-time voters who registered by mail without submitting identification). For more information, see here.
  • Early voting in Illinois opened on Sept. 24 and closes on Nov. 2.
  • Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central Time.

Explore Ohio elections

On the ballot in Ohio

At the federal level, Ohio voters will elect 18 presidential electors and 16 U.S. representatives. Six seats on the state board of education are up for election. Both chambers of the state legislature are on the ballot, with 16 out of 33 seats up in the state Senate and all 99 state House districts. Two seats on the state supreme court and 21 intermediate appellate court seats are on the ballot. Ballotpedia is tracking local elections taking place in five counties and Toledo.

Partisan data

  • In 2016, Donald Trump (R) defeated Hillary Clinton (D) 52% to 44% in Ohio. Barack Obama was the last Democrat to win the state in a presidential election in 2012.
  • Nine of Ohio’s 88 counties are Pivot Counties, accounting for 13.95% of the state’s population. Pivot Counties voted for Barack Obama (D) in 2008 and 2012 and Donald Trump (R) in 2016.
  • Ohio’s senior senator, Sherrod Brown, is a Democrat. Its junior senator, Rob Portman, is a Republican.
  • Republicans represent 12 of the state’s U.S. House districts and Democrats represent four.
  • Ohio’s governor, attorney general, and secretary of state are all Republicans, meaning it is one of 19 states with a Republican triplex. It has held this status since Republicans won all three triplex offices in the 2010 elections.
  • Republicans have a 24-9 majority in the state Senate and a 61-38 majority in the state House. Because the governor is also a Republican, Ohio is one of 21 states with a Republican trifecta. It has held this status since 2011.

Battleground

Here is one battleground race taking place in Ohio this year:

  • 1st Congressional District: Incumbent Steve Chabot (R), Kate Schroder (D), and Kevin Kahn (L) are running for Ohio’s 1st Congressional District. Chabot was first elected in 2010 over incumbent Steve Driehaus (D). He last won election in 2018, defeating Aftab Pureval 51.3% to 46.9%.

Ballot measures

  • There are no statewide ballot measures on the Nov. 3 ballot in Ohio.
  • Click here to see Ballotpedia’s coverage of local ballot measures in Ohio.

Voting

  • Voters can choose to cast absentee or mail-in ballots.
  • Witnesses or notaries are not required to sign a voter’s absentee or mail-in ballot.
  • Absentee/mail-in ballots can be returned in person or by mail. A ballot returned in person must be received by 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 3. A mail-in ballot must be postmarked on or before Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 13. To track your ballot, click here.
  • Ohio election law states that absentee ballots can be scanned prior to the election, but it does not specify further when votes can begin to be counted.
  • In 2018, mail-in ballots were 20.6% of the total votes cast.
  • All voters in Ohio are required to present ID at the polls. Identification does not have to include a photo. For more information about Ohio’s voter ID requirements, see here.
  • Early voting in Ohio begins on Oct. 6 and ends on Nov. 2.
  • Polls are open from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m Eastern time.



About the author

Dave Beaudoin

Dave Beaudoin is a project director at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

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