Author

Ethan Rice

Ethan Rice is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Election Legislation Weekly Digest: November 18, 2022

Here is our weekly round-up on election-related legislation. In it, you’ll find the following information: 

  • Recent activity: Here, we report on the number of bills acted on within the past week. 
  • The big picture: Here, we look at the bills in the aggregate. 
    • Legislative status: How many bills have been introduced, voted upon, or enacted into law?
    • Concentration of activity: What states have seen the highest concentration of legislative activity?
    • Partisan affiliation of sponsorship: How many bills have been sponsored by Democrats vs. Republicans? 
    • Subject: What subjects are most commonly addressed in the bills? 

We will not be sending out a Nov. 25 edition due to the Thanksgiving holiday, but we will resume our weekly coverage of election-related legislation on Dec. 2.

Recent activity

Since November 11, four bills have been acted on in some way (representing a 100 percent increase as compared to last week’s total of 2 bills). These four bills represent 0.2 percent of the 2,530 bills we are tracking. Two of these bills are from states with a divided government, and two are from states with Democratic trifectas.

The bar chart below compares recent activity on a week-to-week basis over the last eight weeks. 

  • 4 bills were introduced (or saw pre-committee action).
    • Divided governments: 2
    • Democratic trifectas: 2

The map below visualizes the concentration of this recent activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been acted upon in the last week. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of bills that have been acted upon in the last week. 

The big picture

To date, we have tracked 2,530 election-related bills. This represents a marginal increase as compared to last week’s total. These bills were either introduced this year or crossed over from last year’s legislative sessions.

 

Legislative status 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of the bills we are tracking. The following status indicators are used: 

  • Introduced: The bill has been pre-filed, introduced, or referred to committee but has not otherwise been acted upon.
  • Advanced from committee: The bill has received a favorable vote in committee. It has either advanced to another committee or to the floor for a vote. 
  • Passed one chamber: The bill has been approved by one legislative chamber.
  • Conference committee: Differing versions of the bill have been approved by their respective chambers and a conference committee has been appointed to reconcile the differences. 
  • Passed both chambers: The bill has cleared both chambers of the legislature. 
  • Enacted: The bill has been enacted into law, by gubernatorial action or inaction or veto override. 
  • Vetoed: The bill has been vetoed. 
  • Dead: The bill has been defeated in committee or by floor vote. 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of bills in Democratic and Republican trifectas, respectively. 

Concentration of activity

The map below visualizes the concentration of legislative activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been introduced. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of relevant bills. 

Partisan affiliation of sponsor(s)

The pie chart below visualizes the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors.

The bar chart below visualizes the correlation between the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors and trifecta status (e.g., how many Democratic-sponsored bills were introduced in Democratic trifectas vs. Republican trifectas).

Bills by topic

The chart below presents information on the total number of bills dealing with particular topics. The number listed on the blue portion of each bar indicates the number of Democratic-sponsored bills dealing with the subject in question. The number listed on the red portion of the bar indicates the number of Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions of the bar indicate the number of bipartisan-sponsored bills and bills with unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Note that the numbers listed here will not, when summed, equal the total number of bills because some bills deal with multiple topics.



Election Legislation Weekly Digest: November 11, 2022

Here is our weekly round-up on election-related legislation. In it, you’ll find the following information: 

  • Recent activity: Here, we report on the number of bills acted on within the past week. 
  • The big picture: Here, we look at the bills in the aggregate. 
    • Legislative status: How many bills have been introduced, voted upon, or enacted into law?
    • Concentration of activity: What states have seen the highest concentration of legislative activity?
    • Partisan affiliation of sponsorship: How many bills have been sponsored by Democrats vs. Republicans? 
    • Subject: What subjects are most commonly addressed in the bills? 

Recent activity

Since November 4, two bills have been acted on in some way. These two bills represent 0.1 percent of the 2,526 bills we are tracking. One of these bills is from a state with a divided government, and one is from a state with a Democratic trifecta.

The bar chart below compares recent activity on a week-to-week basis over the last eight weeks. 

  • 2 bills were introduced (or saw pre-committee action).
    • Democratic trifectas: 1
    • Divided governments: 1

The map below visualizes the concentration of this recent activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been acted upon in the last week. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of bills that have been acted upon in the last week. 

The big picture

To date, we have tracked 2,526 election-related bills. This represents a marginal increase as compared to last week’s total. These bills were either introduced this year or crossed over from last year’s legislative sessions. 

Legislative status 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of the bills we are tracking. The following status indicators are used: 

  • Introduced: The bill has been pre-filed, introduced, or referred to committee but has not otherwise been acted upon.
  • Advanced from committee: The bill has received a favorable vote in committee. It has either advanced to another committee or to the floor for a vote. 
  • Passed one chamber: The bill has been approved by one legislative chamber.
  • Conference committee: Differing versions of the bill have been approved by their respective chambers and a conference committee has been appointed to reconcile the differences. 
  • Passed both chambers: The bill has cleared both chambers of the legislature. 
  • Enacted: The bill has been enacted into law, by gubernatorial action or inaction or veto override. 
  • Vetoed: The bill has been vetoed. 
  • Dead: The bill has been defeated in committee or by floor vote. 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of bills in Democratic and Republican trifectas, respectively. 

Concentration of activity

The map below visualizes the concentration of legislative activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been introduced. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of relevant bills. 

Partisan affiliation of sponsor(s)

The pie chart below visualizes the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors.

The bar chart below visualizes the correlation between the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors and trifecta status (e.g., how many Democratic-sponsored bills were introduced in Democratic trifectas vs. Republican trifectas).

Bills by topic

The chart below presents information on the total number of bills dealing with particular topics. The number listed on the blue portion of each bar indicates the number of Democratic-sponsored bills dealing with the subject in question. The number listed on the red portion of the bar indicates the number of Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions of the bar indicate the number of bipartisan-sponsored bills and bills with unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Note that the numbers listed here will not, when summed, equal the total number of bills because some bills deal with multiple topics.



Election Legislation Weekly Digest: November 4, 2022

Here is our weekly round-up on election-related legislation. In it, you’ll find the following information: 

  • Recent activity: Here, we report on the number of bills acted on within the past week. 
  • The big picture: Here, we look at the bills in the aggregate. 
    • Legislative status: How many bills have been introduced, voted upon, or enacted into law?
    • Concentration of activity: What states have seen the highest concentration of legislative activity?
    • Partisan affiliation of sponsorship: How many bills have been sponsored by Democrats vs. Republicans? 
    • Subject: What subjects are most commonly addressed in the bills? 

Recent activity

Since October 28, no bills have been acted on in any way (representing a 100 percent decrease as compared to last week’s total of 3 bills).

The bar chart below compares recent activity on a week-to-week basis over the last eight weeks. 

The big picture

To date, we have tracked 2,524 election-related bills. These bills were either introduced this year or crossed over from last year’s legislative sessions. 

Legislative status 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of the bills we are tracking. The following status indicators are used: 

  • Introduced: The bill has been pre-filed, introduced, or referred to committee but has not otherwise been acted upon.
  • Advanced from committee: The bill has received a favorable vote in committee. It has either advanced to another committee or to the floor for a vote. 
  • Passed one chamber: The bill has been approved by one legislative chamber.
  • Conference committee: Differing versions of the bill have been approved by their respective chambers and a conference committee has been appointed to reconcile the differences. 
  • Passed both chambers: The bill has cleared both chambers of the legislature. 
  • Enacted: The bill has been enacted into law, by gubernatorial action or inaction or veto override. 
  • Vetoed: The bill has been vetoed. 
  • Dead: The bill has been defeated in committee or by floor vote. 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of bills in Democratic and Republican trifectas, respectively. 

Concentration of activity

The map below visualizes the concentration of legislative activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been introduced. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of relevant bills. 

Partisan affiliation of sponsor(s)

The pie chart below visualizes the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors.

The bar chart below visualizes the correlation between the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors and trifecta status (e.g., how many Democratic-sponsored bills were introduced in Democratic trifectas vs. Republican trifectas).

Bills by topic

The chart below presents information on the total number of bills dealing with particular topics. The number listed on the blue portion of each bar indicates the number of Democratic-sponsored bills dealing with the subject in question. The number listed on the red portion of the bar indicates the number of Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions of the bar indicate the number of bipartisan-sponsored bills and bills with unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Note that the numbers listed here will not, when summed, equal the total number of bills because some bills deal with multiple topics.



Lierman and Glassman running for Maryland comptroller on Nov. 8

Brooke Elizabeth Lierman (D) and Barry Glassman (R) are running for Maryland comptroller on Nov. 8, 2022. Incumbent Peter Franchot (D) ran for election for governor of Maryland. He lost in the Democratic primary on July 19, 2022.

Lierman has represented District 46 of the Maryland House of Delegates since 2015. She also worked as a disability and civil rights attorney and field organizer for U.S. Sen. Paul Wellstone (D) and former presidential candidate Howard Dean (D). “As one of only three statewide, independently-elected officials,” Lierman said, “I will provide strong independent oversight of our state’s financial resources and be an advocate for families, communities, and small businesses.” Lierman’s endorsers include U.S. Rep. Jamie Raskin (D), U.S. Rep. John Sarbanes (D), and The Baltimore Sun.

Glassman represented District 35 of the Maryland State Senate from 2009 to 2015 and served in the Maryland House of Delegates from 1999 to 2008. In 2014, Glassman was elected as county executive of Harford County. His professional experience includes working as a claims investigator for Travelers Insurance Company. On his campaign website, Glassman said, “Maryland’s budget is nearly $50 billion. As your Comptroller, I will hold the state accountable for spending money responsibly and in your best interest.” Glassman’s endorsers include Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R), the Maryland Farm Bureau, and The Washington Post.

Lierman and Glassman both made statements regarding environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG) issues. Lierman said she would “ensure that any outside investment management firms reflect the diversity of our state, and ensure our investments are prudent while also reflecting our progressive values” and that “[m]aking climate resilience one of the key pillars of the Comptroller’s Office will ensure that all decision-making and functions have a ‘climate lens’ by which to define future actions.” Glassman said, “The state constitution sets that office up as a non-partisan CFO. A bookkeeper — more than a bookkeeper — a tax collector, revenue-estimator, all those fiscal duties. The comptroller is not intended to be a partisan position,” and said, “I don’t think a carbon neutral or a new policy such as that is probably realistic going forward.”

The comptroller’s main duties are to collect all of the revenues from state programs, to provide information technology services for most of the state agencies, and to regulate the state’s alcohol, tobacco, and motor fuel industries. The officer also serves as a member of many state boards and commissions, such as the board of revenue estimates, the board of public works, and the board of trustees of the State retirement and pension system. Additional responsibilities of the office include registering wills, performing compliance audits for taxpayers, handling delinquent tax collection, and enforcing license and unclaimed property laws. The comptroller oversees agency efforts to publicize forgotten bank accounts, insurance benefits, and other unclaimed assets of state taxpayers.



Election Legislation Weekly Digest: October 28, 2022

Here is our weekly round-up on election-related legislation. In it, you’ll find the following information: 

  • Noteworthy bills: Here, we identify and report on the contents and legislative status of noteworthy bills. 
  • Recent activity: Here, we report on the number of bills acted on within the past week. 
  • The big picture: Here, we look at the bills in the aggregate. 
    • Legislative status: How many bills have been introduced, voted upon, or enacted into law?
    • Concentration of activity: What states have seen the highest concentration of legislative activity?
    • Partisan affiliation of sponsorship: How many bills have been sponsored by Democrats vs. Republicans? 
    • Subject: What subjects are most commonly addressed in the bills? 

Noteworthy bills

This part of our report highlights recent activity on specific noteworthy bills. A bill is noteworthy if it meets one or more of the following criteria: 

  • It has been enacted into law. 
  • It is poised to be enacted into law. 
  • It is the subject of significant debate in the legislature. 
  • It is the subject of significant commentary by activists, journalists, etc. 

Pennsylvania HB1596: This bill requires voters to provide proof of valid, government-issued identification and to submit a signature of record prior to their ballot being accepted.

Legislative history: The bill was introduced on June 10, 2021, and cleared the House State Government Committee on September 27 of that year before being tabled. The House removed the bill from the table on October 24, 2022. 

Political context: Pennsylvania has a divided government, meaning that neither party controls both the governorship and both chambers of the state legislature. 

Recent activity

Since October 21, four bills have been acted on in some way (representing a 33 percent increase as compared to last week’s total of 3 bills). These four bills represent 0.2 percent of the 2,524 bills we are tracking. All four of these bills are from a state with a divided government. 

The bar chart below compares recent activity on a week-to-week basis over the last eight weeks. 

  • 2 bills were introduced (or saw pre-committee action).
    • Democratic trifectas: 2
  • 1 bill advanced from committee (or saw post-committee action).
    • Divided governments: 1
  • 1 bill passed one chamber (or saw pre-adoption action in the second chamber).
    • Divided governments: 1

The map below visualizes the concentration of this recent activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been acted upon in the last week. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of bills that have been acted upon in the last week. 

The big picture

To date, we have tracked 2,524 election-related bills. This represents a marginal increase as compared to last week’s total. These bills were either introduced this year or crossed over from last year’s legislative sessions. 

Legislative status 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of the bills we are tracking. The following status indicators are used: 

  • Introduced: The bill has been pre-filed, introduced, or referred to committee but has not otherwise been acted upon.
  • Advanced from committee: The bill has received a favorable vote in committee. It has either advanced to another committee or to the floor for a vote. 
  • Passed one chamber: The bill has been approved by one legislative chamber.
  • Conference committee: Differing versions of the bill have been approved by their respective chambers and a conference committee has been appointed to reconcile the differences. 
  • Passed both chambers: The bill has cleared both chambers of the legislature. 
  • Enacted: The bill has been enacted into law, by gubernatorial action or inaction or veto override. 
  • Vetoed: The bill has been vetoed. 
  • Dead: The bill has been defeated in committee or by floor vote. 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of bills in Democratic and Republican trifectas, respectively. 

Concentration of activity

The map below visualizes the concentration of legislative activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been introduced. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of relevant bills. 

Partisan affiliation of sponsor(s)

The pie chart below visualizes the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors.

The bar chart below visualizes the correlation between the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors and trifecta status (e.g., how many Democratic-sponsored bills were introduced in Democratic trifectas vs. Republican trifectas).

Bills by topic

The chart below presents information on the total number of bills dealing with particular topics. The number listed on the blue portion of each bar indicates the number of Democratic-sponsored bills dealing with the subject in question. The number listed on the red portion of the bar indicates the number of Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions of the bar indicate the number of bipartisan-sponsored bills and bills with unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Note that the numbers listed here will not, when summed, equal the total number of bills because some bills deal with multiple topics.



Election Legislation Weekly Digest: October 21, 2022

Here is our weekly round-up on election-related legislation. In it, you’ll find the following information: 

  • Noteworthy bills: Here, we identify and report on the contents and legislative status of noteworthy bills. 
  • Recent activity: Here, we report on the number of bills acted on within the past week. 
  • The big picture: Here, we look at the bills in the aggregate. 
    • Legislative status: How many bills have been introduced, voted upon, or enacted into law?
    • Concentration of activity: What states have seen the highest concentration of legislative activity?
    • Partisan affiliation of sponsorship: How many bills have been sponsored by Democrats vs. Republicans? 
    • Subject: What subjects are most commonly addressed in the bills? 

Noteworthy bills

This part of our report highlights recent activity on specific noteworthy bills. A bill is noteworthy if it meets one or more of the following criteria: 

  • It has been enacted into law. 
  • It is poised to be enacted into law. 
  • It is the subject of significant debate in the legislature. 
  • It is the subject of significant commentary by activists, journalists, etc. 

New York A07748: This bill allows confidential voting registration records for victims of sex offenses and crimes under article one hundred thirty of the penal law.

Legislative history: On May 18, the state Assembly passed the bill 138-11. The state Senate approved the bill unanimously on May 31. The bill was delivered to New York Governor Kathy Hochul (D) on Oct. 18. Hochul signed the bill into law the same day.

Political context: New York is a Democratic trifecta, meaning that Democrats control the governorship and majorities in both chambers of the state legislature. 

Recent activity

Since October 14, three bills have been acted on in some way (representing a 40 percent decrease as compared to last week’s total of 5 bills). These three bills represent 0.1 percent of the 2,523 bills we are tracking. Two of these bills (66.6%) are from states with Democratic trifectas, and one is from a state with a divided government. 

The bar chart below compares recent activity on a week-to-week basis over the last eight weeks. 

  • 1 bill was introduced (or saw pre-committee action).
    • Democratic trifectas: 1
  • 1 bill advanced from committee (or saw post-committee action).
    • Divided governments: 1.
  • 1 bill was enacted.

The map below visualizes the concentration of this recent activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been acted upon in the last week. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of bills that have been acted upon in the last week. 

The big picture

To date, we have tracked 2,523 election-related bills. This represents a marginal increase as compared to last week’s total. These bills were either introduced this year or crossed over from last year’s legislative sessions. 

Legislative status 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of the bills we are tracking. The following status indicators are used: 

  • Introduced: The bill has been pre-filed, introduced, or referred to committee but has not otherwise been acted upon.
  • Advanced from committee: The bill has received a favorable vote in committee. It has either advanced to another committee or to the floor for a vote. 
  • Passed one chamber: The bill has been approved by one legislative chamber.
  • Conference committee: Differing versions of the bill have been approved by their respective chambers and a conference committee has been appointed to reconcile the differences. 
  • Passed both chambers: The bill has cleared both chambers of the legislature. 
  • Enacted: The bill has been enacted into law, by gubernatorial action or inaction or veto override. 
  • Vetoed: The bill has been vetoed. 
  • Dead: The bill has been defeated in committee or by floor vote. 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of bills in Democratic and Republican trifectas, respectively. 

Concentration of activity

The map below visualizes the concentration of legislative activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been introduced. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of relevant bills. 

Partisan affiliation of sponsor(s)

The pie chart below visualizes the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors.

The bar chart below visualizes the correlation between the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors and trifecta status (e.g., how many Democratic-sponsored bills were introduced in Democratic trifectas vs. Republican trifectas).

Bills by topic

The chart below presents information on the total number of bills dealing with particular topics. The number listed on the blue portion of each bar indicates the number of Democratic-sponsored bills dealing with the subject in question. The number listed on the red portion of the bar indicates the number of Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions of the bar indicate the number of bipartisan-sponsored bills and bills with unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Note that the numbers listed here will not, when summed, equal the total number of bills because some bills deal with multiple topics.



Four candidates running for Minnesota state auditor on Nov. 8

Incumbent Julie Blaha (D), Ryan Wilson (R), Will Finn (Grassroots-Legalize Cannabis Party of Minnesota), and Tim Davis (Legal Marijuana Now Party) are running for Minnesota state auditor on Nov. 8, 2022.

Blaha was elected state auditor in 2018. She served as the secretary-treasurer of the Minnesota AFL-CIO and the president of Anoka-Hennepin Education Minnesota, a local affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers. Blaha said she is “committed to protecting local solutions and providing resources to local governments” and “is running for re-election to ensure Minnesotans can continue to make decisions that benefit their communities.”

Wilson worked as an entrepreneur and attorney. He founded and was CEO of a Minnesota-based auditing firm in the medical device industry. Wilson said he “decided to run for State Auditor after recent reports of significant fraud in Minnesota’s safety-net programs and the gross mismanagement of large infrastructure projects, and a disturbing regression in government transparency and accountability that Minnesotans have witnessed in recent years.”

MinnPost’s Peter Callaghan said environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG) policy was a key issue in the race. “So far, the issue has emerged in only one statewide Minnesota race. As one of four members of the State Board of Investment, the state auditor helps set policy for how the $130 billion in state funds are invested,” Callaghan said.

According to the Minnesota State Board of Investment’s website, the board “serves the State of Minnesota by investing the assets of state and local employee benefit plans, other public retirement savings plans, tax advantaged savings plans, and non-retirement assets.” The board comprises the governor, who serves as chair, the state auditor, the secretary of state, and the attorney general.

Blaha said there were “significant risks and…significant opportunities in how climate is changing and how we’re transitioning energy. The evidence is overwhelming, and it’s also common sense. How many of us are sinking our savings into coal right now?” Wilson said the state should “let the chief investment officer and the manager they work with be unleashed to get the best-possible return. The chief investment officer doesn’t need the state board of investments to tell them to take classes of assets off the table. We don’t need a partisan thumb on the scale.”

In the 2018 election, Blaha defeated Pam Myhra (R) 49.4%-43.2%. Rebecca Otto (D) served as state auditor before Blaha, assuming office in 2006.



Election Legislation Weekly Digest: October 14, 2022

Here is our weekly round-up on election-related legislation. In it, you’ll find the following information: 

  • Noteworthy bills: Here, we identify and report on the contents and legislative status of noteworthy bills. 
  • Recent activity: Here, we report on the number of bills acted on within the past week. 
  • The big picture: Here, we look at the bills in the aggregate. 
    • Legislative status: How many bills have been introduced, voted upon, or enacted into law?
    • Concentration of activity: What states have seen the highest concentration of legislative activity?
    • Partisan affiliation of sponsorship: How many bills have been sponsored by Democrats vs. Republicans? 
    • Subject: What subjects are most commonly addressed in the bills? 

Noteworthy bills

This part of our report highlights recent activity on specific noteworthy bills. A bill is noteworthy if it meets one or more of the following criteria: 

  • It has been enacted into law. 
  • It is poised to be enacted into law. 
  • It is the subject of significant debate in the legislature. 
  • It is the subject of significant commentary by activists, journalists, etc. 

California AB2841: This bill requires the clerk of each superior court to notify the Secretary of State each month of findings made by the court regarding a person’s competency to vote and the number of court proceedings related to the determination of a person’s competency to vote. The Secretary of State must send this information to the appropriate county elections official, who must cancel the person’s registration or notify the person that the person’s right to vote has been restored.

Legislative history: On Aug. 29, the state Senate approved the final version of the bill 29-9. On Aug. 30, the state Assembly approved the bill 59-18. The bill was presented to Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) on Sept. 9. Newsom signed the bill on Sept. 29.

Political context: California is a Democratic trifecta, meaning that Democrats control the governorship and majorities in both chambers of the state legislature. 

Recent activity

Since October 7, five bills have been acted on in some way. These five bills represent 0.2 percent of the 2,522 bills we are tracking. All five of these bills (100.0%) are from states with divided governments. 

The bar chart below compares recent activity on a week-to-week basis over the last eight weeks. 

  • 2 bills were introduced (or saw pre-committee action).
    • Divided governments: 2.
  • 1 bill advanced from committee (or saw post-committee action).
    • Divided governments: 1.
  • 2 bills passed one chamber (or saw pre-adoption action in the second chamber).
    • Divided governments: 2.

The map below visualizes the concentration of this recent activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been acted upon in the last week. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of bills that have been acted upon in the last week. 

The big picture

To date, we have tracked 2,522 election-related bills. This represents a marginal increase as compared to last week’s total. These bills were either introduced this year or crossed over from last year’s legislative sessions. 

Legislative status 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of the bills we are tracking. The following status indicators are used: 

  • Introduced: The bill has been pre-filed, introduced, or referred to committee but has not otherwise been acted upon.
  • Advanced from committee: The bill has received a favorable vote in committee. It has either advanced to another committee or to the floor for a vote. 
  • Passed one chamber: The bill has been approved by one legislative chamber.
  • Conference committee: Differing versions of the bill have been approved by their respective chambers and a conference committee has been appointed to reconcile the differences. 
  • Passed both chambers: The bill has cleared both chambers of the legislature. 
  • Enacted: The bill has been enacted into law, by gubernatorial action or inaction or veto override. 
  • Vetoed: The bill has been vetoed. 
  • Dead: The bill has been defeated in committee or by floor vote. 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of bills in Democratic and Republican trifectas, respectively. 

Concentration of activity

The map below visualizes the concentration of legislative activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been introduced. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of relevant bills. 

Partisan affiliation of sponsor(s)

The pie chart below visualizes the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors.

The bar chart below visualizes the correlation between the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors and trifecta status (e.g., how many Democratic-sponsored bills were introduced in Democratic trifectas vs. Republican trifectas).

Bills by topic

The chart below presents information on the total number of bills dealing with particular topics. The number listed on the blue portion of each bar indicates the number of Democratic-sponsored bills dealing with the subject in question. The number listed on the red portion of the bar indicates the number of Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions of the bar indicate the number of bipartisan-sponsored bills and bills with unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Note that the numbers listed here will not, when summed, equal the total number of bills because some bills deal with multiple topics.



Michael L. Fitzgerald and Roby Smith running for Iowa treasurer on Nov. 8

Incumbent Michael L. Fitzgerald (D) and Roby Smith (R) are running for Iowa treasurer on Nov. 8, 2022.

Fitzgerald has served as Iowa treasurer of state since 1983. Before taking office, Fitzgerald worked as a marketing analyst for Massey Ferguson Company. Fitzgerald said, “In times like today, there is no question that experience counts. Through my leadership, I will continue to promote fair government and safe financial strategies.”

Smith has represented Iowa Senate District 47 since 2011. Smith also worked as a banker and small business owner. According to his campaign website, Smith has “never missed a single vote from the floor of the Iowa Senate in eleven years” and “will bring that same dedication and work ethic to the State Treasurer’s office, where he will show up every day ready to work for Iowa’s taxpayers.”

The Iowa Capital Dispatch‘s Kate Kealy said, “If elected as state treasurer, former Republican state Sen. Roby Smith would use the position to prevent federal overreach and ensure Iowa tax dollars don’t aid terrorist organizations, his campaign states. Democratic incumbent Michael Fitzgerald said he hopes to continue building on programs he implemented during his time as the longest-serving state treasurer in the nation.”

Fitzgerald said Iowa should establish a state retirement program for Iowans with no retirement plans through their employer and said the state should protect state pension funds. “With half the people in Iowa approaching retirement age with no pension or retirement benefits, I think it’s a serious problem,” Fitzgerald said. In September 2022, Fitzgerald also announced a $10 million investment in Israel Bonds through the Development Corporation for Israel.

Smith emphasized financial privacy, saying, “Iowa needs a treasurer who understands the challenges of the 21st century and is willing to protect Iowans from a Biden administration that is determined to invade our financial privacy.” Smith also highlighted his support of tax reforms and financial literacy programs while a member of the Iowa Senate.

In the 2018 election, Fitzgerald defeated Jeremy Davis (R) with 55%-43%.

The Iowa treasurer is the state’s chief financial officer. The treasurer is elected to serve a four-year term concurrent with the governor’s term. The Iowa Treasurer’s Office maintains state funds and acts as the state’s bank. The main duties of the office include receiving and distributing state funds, investing state money, maintaining state accounts, and coordinating financial planning.



Incumbent Rob Sand and Todd Halbur running for Iowa state auditor on Nov. 8

Incumbent Rob Sand (D) and Todd Halbur (R) are running for Iowa state auditor on Nov. 8, 2022.

Sand has been the Iowa auditor of state since 2019. Sand also served as assistant attorney general under Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller (D). On his campaign website, Sand said he has been non-partisan as auditor: “[Sand] defends the other party from unfair or untruthful attacks, while also criticizing his own party even when he doesn’t have to.” Sand also highlighted his record as auditor, saying he “has identified more waste, fraud, and abuse than any other single term from any other State Auditor.”

Halbur’s professional experience includes working in the banking and finance industry and as a real estate agent. He was also the former CFO of the Iowa Alcoholic Beverages Division. Halbur said he is “a fiscal conservative focused on protecting Iowa’s Taxpayer dollars by following the rule of law instead of being a politician. I will operate the Auditor’s office with integrity, accountability and openness.” Halbur emphasized his professional background, saying, “Iowa needs an Auditor with the financial background and qualifications I have from my previous positions in the banking industry and as a CFO.”

The Iowa Capital Dispatch‘s Kate Kealey described the race as follows: “In the race for state auditor, Democratic incumbent Rob Sand promises voters he will remain committed to serving as the taxpayers’ watchdog, while Republican opponent Todd Halbur believes the job should be separate from partisan disputes.”

In the 2018 election, Sand defeated incumbent Mary Mosiman (R) 51%-46%. Before Sand’s election, Iowa had had a Republican state auditor since 1939.

The auditor is responsible for audits of counties, cities, school districts, and other governmental offices and is required to provide guidelines to CPA firms performing such audits.