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James McAllister

James McAllister is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 231,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 2,000 for the week ending June 25 to a seasonally adjusted 231,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 229,000 to 233,000. The four-week moving average as of June 25 rose to 231,750 from a revised 224,500 as of the week ending June 18.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, fell 3,000 to a seasonally adjusted 1.328 million for the week ending June 18. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 229,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 2,000 for the week ending June 18 to a seasonally adjusted 229,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 229,000 to 231,000. The four-week moving average as of June 18 rose to 223,500 from a revised 219,000 as of the week ending June 11.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 5,000 to a seasonally adjusted 1.315 million for the week ending June 11. Reporting for continuing claims lag one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

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Iowa governor signs law to reduce duration of unemployment insurance benefits

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) signed HF 2355 on June 16, reducing the maximum length of unemployment insurance payments from 26 weeks to 16 weeks starting July 3. The law also re-defines suitable work and will require claimants to accept jobs that pay less than their previous jobs after their first week of benefits. Workers who claim unemployment insurance longer will have to take jobs that pay a lower percentage of their previous wages or salaries.

Workers who file for benefits before the week of July 3 will still be eligible for up to 26 weeks of benefits, but they will have to comply with the new suitable work requirements.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For more information on Iowa’s unemployment insurance program, click here. For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

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Oregon Employment Department announces increased unemployment insurance benefit minimums and maximums

The Oregon Employment Department (OED) announced the minimum and maximum unemployment insurance benefit amounts would increase about 7% for regular claims filed on or after July 3, 2022. The minimum amount will increase from $171 to $183 per week, and the maximum amount will increase from $733 to $783 per week.

Individuals who file for benefits before July 3 will not be eligible for the larger payments.

State law requires the OED to recalculate weekly minimum and maximum benefit amounts annually based on the average weekly wages Oregon residents earn. The minimum benefit amount is set each year at 15% of the average weekly wage. The maximum is set at 64% of the average weekly wage.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 200,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits rose 27,000 for the week ending June 4 to a seasonally adjusted 229,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 200,000 to 202,000. The four-week moving average as of June 4 rose to 215,000 from a revised 207,000 as of the week ending May 21.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, remained flat at a seasonally adjusted 1.306 million for the week ending May 28. Reporting for continuing claims lag one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



Colorado governor signs law to direct federal funds to repay unemployment insurance debt

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis (D) on May 25 signed SB22-234, which will direct $600 million of federal American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds to help pay back the state’s $1 billion unemployment insurance trust fund debt to the federal government.

The law will also forgive certain non-fraud overpayments, meaning some workers who received more unemployment insurance payments than they were owed during the coronavirus pandemic will not have to pay the money back. The law also contains provisions allowing claimants to work part-time and make up to half their previous incomes without a benefit reduction and allowing unlawful U.S. immigrants to claim unemployment insurance benefits if their employer pays unemployment taxes.

The $600 million funding aims to reduce the unemployment insurance tax burden on employers, which increased in 2022 and was slated to increase in 2023 if the fund’s solvency did not improve.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For more information on Colorado’s unemployment insurance program, click here. For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

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Kansas governor announces start of unemployment insurance modernization effort

Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly (D) announced June 2 that the Kansas Department of Labor (KDL) has started what it describes as its effort to modernize the state’s unemployment insurance system. Kelly said the project will take 26 months and cost roughly $48 million.

The KDL previously announced April 5 that the state chose to contract with Tata Consultancy Services to update the current IT system for processing unemployment insurance claims, but the budget and timeline for the project were not known at the time of the announcement.

Kelly said the state will regularly update the KDL website with progress reports related to the project. For more information, click here.

Kansas launched its existing unemployment insurance IT system in the 1970s.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For more information on Kansas’ unemployment insurance program, click here. For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

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U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 200,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 11,000 for the week ending May 28 to a seasonally adjusted 200,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 210,000 to 211,000. The four-week moving average as of May 28 fell to 206,500 from a revised 207,000 as of the week ending May 21.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, fell to a seasonally adjusted 1.309 million for the week ending May 21. Reporting for continuing claims lag one week. The continuing claims figure was the lowest since December 27, 1969.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims rise to 218,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits rose 21,000 for the week ending May 14 to a seasonally adjusted 218,000. The previous week’s figure was revised down from 203,000 to 197,000. The four-week moving average as of May 14 rose to 199,500 from a revised 191,250 as of the week ending May 7.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, fell to a seasonally adjusted 1.317 million for the week ending May 7. Reporting for continuing claims lag one week. The continuing claims figure was the lowest since Dec. 27, 1969.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

Additional reading:



Oklahoma governor signs unemployment insurance indexing bill

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) signed House Bill 1933 into law on May 20, which will cut the maximum length of unemployment insurance benefits from 26 weeks to 16 weeks starting Jan. 1, 2023. The law will index unemployment insurance benefits starting Jan. 1, 2025, tying the length of benefits to the state’s unemployment rate. Oklahoma will provide shorter periods of benefits during times of low unemployment (with a minimum of 16 weeks) and longer periods of benefits during times of high unemployment (with a maximum of 26 weeks).

At least five states have already implemented some form of unemployment insurance benefits indexing: Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, and North Carolina.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For more information on Oklahoma’s unemployment insurance program, click here. For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

Additional reading: