Author

Mandy Gillip

Mandy Gillip is a project director at Ballotpedia and can be reached at mandy.gillip@ballotpedia.org

Pair of runoffs on Tuesday for Phoenix City Council

Special general runoff elections for Districts 5 and 8 of the Phoenix City Council are being held on Tuesday. The nonpartisan runoff was called because no candidate received at least 50 percent of the vote in the special election held on March 12. The filing deadline for candidates who wished to run in the election was December 12, 2018.
 
In the District 5 race, incumbent Vania Guevara faces challenger Betty Guardado, while newcomers Carlos Garcia and Michael Johnson are competing in District 8.
 
The special election became necessary after former District 5 representative Daniel Valenzuela and former District 8 representative Kate Gallego both resigned to run for mayor of Phoenix in a special election on November 6, 2018. They advanced to a special runoff election on March 12, 2019, where Gallego defeated Valenzuela.
 
Phoenix is the largest city in Arizona and the sixth-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 
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Two advance to June runoff in San Antonio mayor race

The city of San Antonio held nonpartisan general elections for mayor on Saturday. None of the nine mayoral candidates, including incumbent Ron Nirenberg, won at least 50 percent of the vote in the election. As a result, the top two vote recipients—Nirenberg (49,297 votes) and challenger Greg Brockhouse (46,129 votes)—advanced to a general runoff election on June 8. Nirenberg was first elected as mayor in 2017, and he is running for a second term. The filing deadline to run for office was February 15.
 
Ballotpedia also covered elections for all 10 seats on the San Antonio City Council on Saturday. The races in Districts 2, 4, and 6 advanced to a June runoff election, while the remaining seven districts were won outright in the general election.
 
Thirty-one mayoral elections in the nation’s 100 largest cities are being held in 2019. In 20 of those cities, the incumbent was Democratic at the start of 2019. Seven incumbents were Republican, three were independent, and the affiliation of one was unknown. As of May 2019, one partisan change has taken place. Voters in Phoenix, Arizona, elected Kate Gallego (D) in a nonpartisan mayoral runoff election on March 12, 2019. Gallego succeeded Thelda Williams, a Republican.
 
San Antonio is the second-largest city in Texas and the eighth-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 


Virginia Beach holding 3 regular and 3 special elections in 2019

The city of Virginia Beach, Virginia, is holding regular elections for clerk of court and two positions on the Virginia Dare Soil and Water Conservation District on November 5, 2019, as well as a special election for treasurer after the 2018 retirement of John Atkinson, who served in the position for 41 years. Atkinson’s son—Clay Atkinson—filed in the election and faces interim incumbent Leigh Henderson.
 
Two additional special elections will be held on November 5 for the Beach District and Rose Hall District seats on the Virginia Beach City Council. In the Beach District, Councilman David Nygaard was removed from office on March 19 after local judges ruled he did not meet the residency requirements to fill the seat. He was first elected to the position on November 6, 2018. On April 23, the council appointed interim member Guy Tower to serve until the November election.
 
Councilwoman Shannon Kane also resigned from her position as representative of the Rose Hall District on April 6, 2019. According to WAVY, Kane purchased a home outside of the district and was moving immediately. She also filed to seek election to the Virginia House of Delegates to represent District 21 and is running in the general election on November 5, 2019. The council has until May 7 to choose Kane’s successor.
 
The filing deadline for clerk of court and city treasurer was March 28, and a primary election for these positions is on June 11. The candidate filing deadline for the Virginia Dare District members and independent candidates for all races is June 11, and the filing deadline for the special city council elections is August 16.
 


Trio of open-seat Lincoln City Council races on general election ballot

A nonpartisan primary for four of seven seats on the Lincoln City Council and one of five elected seats on the Lincoln Airport Authority was held on Tuesday. The general election is on May 7.
 
In the races for city council, only one incumbent filed for re-election – Jane Raybould in District 3 – guaranteeing at least three newcomers will join the council in 2019. In Districts 1 and 3, only two candidates filed for each and both automatically advanced to the general election. In the District 2 race, Megan Stock and Richard Meginnis defeated Mike James to advance, and in the District 4 race, Cassey Lottman lost to James Herrold and Tammy Ward. In the airport authority primary, Nick Cusick and Aurang Zeb were the only candidates to file and both advanced to the May 7 general election.
 
Although candidates had the option to file with political parties, city elections are nonpartisan and political parties do not appear on the ballot. The mayor’s office and a sales tax measure were also on the April 9 ballot.
 
Lincoln is the second-largest city in Nebraska and the 71st-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 


Baird and Lamm advance in open-seat Nebraska mayoral primary

A nonpartisan primary for mayor of Lincoln, Nebraska, was held on Tuesday. Candidates Leirion Gaylor Baird and Cyndi Lamm advanced to the general election after defeating Jeff Kirkpatrick, Krystal Gabel, and Rene Solc. The filing deadline was March 7, and the general election is on May 7. The city’s current mayor, Chris Beutler (D), was first elected in 2007 and could not seek re-election due to term limits.
 
Although candidates had the option to file with political parties, city elections are nonpartisan and political parties do not appear on the ballot. Baird filed as a Democratic candidate and received 43.5 percent of the vote according to unofficial election night results, while Lamm filed as a Republican and received 33.5 percent of the vote. Kirkpatrick, the third-place finisher with 18.8 percent of the vote, also filed as a Democrat. Gabel and Solc both filed as nonpartisan candidates.
 
Lincoln is the second-largest city in Nebraska and the 71st-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 


Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers re-elected with 72.5% of vote

On April 2, Colorado Springs, Colorado, Mayor John Suthers faced three challengers in the nonpartisan general election. With 72.5 percent of the vote, Suthers won the election outright. Juliette Parker, the candidate finishing in second place, received 11.9 percent of the vote.
 
Colorado Springs also held a nonpartisan general election for three of nine at-large city council seats. Both incumbents running for re-election won another term. The highest vote recipient was former Colorado Secretary of State Wayne W. Williams. This will be his first term on the council. He received 18.6 percent of the vote, while incumbent Bill Murray received 12.4 percent of the vote, and incumbent Tom Strand received 12.2 percent of the vote. They faced eight other candidates in the at-large race.
 
Colorado Springs is the second-largest city in Colorado and the 40th-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 


95 percent of New Jersey Assembly incumbents file for re-election

The major-party filing deadline passed on April 1 to run for seats in the New Jersey General Assembly. The filing deadline for independent candidates is on June 4. All 80 seats in the state Assembly are up for election this year; the primary is scheduled for June 4, and the general election is on November 5.
 
The New Jersey General Assembly has 40 multi-member districts, with two representatives in each district. In Democratic and Republican primaries, the top two candidates from each party move forward to the general election, and the top two vote recipients in the general election are declared the winners.
 
A total of 181 candidates filed in the election – 98 Democrats and 83 Republicans. There are 18 contested primaries with more than two candidates running.
 
A total of 76 of the chamber’s 80 incumbents (95 percent) filed for re-election, which leaves four open-seat races. All 76 incumbents running for re-election face at least one challenger. In the 2017 state Assembly elections, 88.8 percent of incumbents filed for re-election and nine seats were open.
 
Entering the 2019 election, the New Jersey General Assembly has 54 Democrats and 26 Republicans. A majority in the chamber requires 41 seats. New Jersey has a Democratic state government trifecta. A state government trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and both state legislative chambers.
 


Ballotpedia covering local elections across seven states on Tuesday

Ballotpedia is covering local elections on April 2, 2019, across seven states—Alaska, Colorado, Illinois, Missouri, Nevada, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin.
 
*The city of Anchorage, Alaska, is holding nonpartisan general elections for five of 11 seats on the Anchorage Assembly. The filing deadline for this election was February 1. The contested races for District 2 Seat A, District 3 Seat D, and District 4 Seat F all feature newcomers. The remaining races for District 5 Seat H and District 6 Seat J feature unopposed incumbents. Anchorage is the largest city in Alaska and the 62nd-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 
Two of seven seats on the Anchorage School District school board in Alaska are also up for nonpartisan general election on Tuesday. The filing deadline for this election was February 1. Two newcomers are facing off in the race for Seat A, and incumbent Starr Marsett faces challengers David Nees and Ronald Stafford in the race for Seat B. The Anchorage School District served 48,238 students during the 2016-2017 school year.
 
*In Colorado, the city of Colorado Springs is holding nonpartisan general elections for mayor and three of nine seats on the city council. If no candidate wins at least 50 percent of the vote in the general election, a runoff election is scheduled for May 21. The filing deadline for this election passed on January 22.
 
In the race for mayor, incumbent John Suthers is seeking a second term in office and faces three challengers: Lawrence Martinez, Juliette Parker, and John Pitchford.
 
The contested at-large race for three Colorado Springs City Council seats features two incumbents and nine challengers. In 2017, six seats were up for election resulting in the re-election of three incumbents and the addition of three newcomers to the city council.
 
Colorado Springs is the second-largest city in Colorado and the 40th-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 
*Chicago will hold its runoff election for mayor, treasurer, and 15 aldermen seats. Ballotpedia is also covering nonpartisan school board elections for Illinois School District U-46 on Tuesday. Four of the district’s seven board seats are up for general election. The filing deadline for this election was December 20, 2018. Three incumbents and eight candidates are running in the at-large race. This is the only elected Illinois school district covered by Ballotpedia in 2019. The district served 39,665 students during the 2016-2017 school year.
 
*The city of St. Louis, Missouri, is holding partisan general elections for Metro Council President and 15 metro council seats on April 2. A primary was held on March 5 to narrow the field of candidates. The regular filing deadline for this election was January 4, and the independent candidate filing deadline was February 11.
 
In the race for council president, Democrat Jeffrey Reed faces Green Party member Jerome Bauer, after both advanced from the primary. No Republican candidate filed in the election.
 
St. Louis is the second-largest city in Missouri and the 57th-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 
*Missouri is also holding nonpartisan general school board elections on Tuesday. Ballotpedia is covering elections for 29 seats across 11 school districts. Collectively, these districts served 126,611 students during the 2016-2017 school year. The largest of these districts is  St. Louis Public Schools, which served 28,270 students during the 2016-2017 school year. Missouri holds school board elections annually.
 
*In Henderson, Nevada, nonpartisan primaries are being held for the Ward I, II, and IV seats on the city council and for one municipal court judge. The general election is on June 11, and the filing deadline for this election was January 31.
Each primary race is contested. The Ward II and IV incumbents each face a challenger in their bids for re-election, and five newcomers are running in Ward 1.
 
In the race for Henderson Municipal Court Judge Department 1, incumbent Mark Stevens faces challenger Regina McConnell.
Henderson is the second-largest city in Nevada and the 70th-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 
*In Las Vegas, Nevada, nonpartisan primaries for mayor and the Wards 1, 3, and 5 seats on the city council will be held. The general election is on June 11, and the candidate filing deadline was February 8.
 
Mayor Carolyn Goodman faces six challengers in her bid for a third term. Goodman was first elected in 2011, succeeding her husband, Oscar B. Goodman, who had served the maximum of three terms in office.
 
Each city council race is contested with 10 newcomers running in Ward 1, seven newcomers running in Ward 3, and incumbent Cedric Crear facing two challengers in Ward 5.
 
The city will also hold a special election for the Ward 2 seat on the city council on June 11, 2019. The filing deadline for this election was March 28, 2019. The special election became necessary after former Ward 2 representative Steve Seroka resigned on March 4, 2019. Prior to his resignation, Seroka was subject to a recall attempt.
 
Las Vegas is the largest city in Nevada and the 29th-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 
*The city of North Las Vegas, Nevada, is holding nonpartisan general elections for the Wards 2 and 4 seats on Tuesday. The candidate filing deadline was on February 8. Incumbent Pamela Goynes-Brown faces challenger Christopher Burns in Ward 2, and incumbent Richard Cherchio faces five challengers in Ward 4.
 
North Las Vegas is the fourth-largest city in Nevada and the 95th-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 
*Oklahoma will hold its nonpartisan general school board elections on Tuesday. Ballotpedia is covering the election of 30 school board seats across 26 Oklahoma school districts in 2019. Collectively, these districts served 261,543 students during the 2016-2017 school year. The largest of these districts is Oklahoma City Public Schools, which served 39,806 students during the 2016-2017 school year. Oklahoma holds its school board elections annually.
 
*In Dane County, Wisconsin, nonpartisan general elections for circuit court judge and two county supervisor seats are being held. If more than two candidates had filed to run per seat, a primary would have been held on February 19, but each of the races is unopposed. The filing deadline for this election was January 2.
 
*The city of Madison, Wisconsin, is holding a nonpartisan general election for mayor. A primary was held on February 19 to narrow the field of candidates. The filing deadline for this election was January 2.
 
Incumbent Paul Soglin faces challenger Satya Rhodes-Conway after they defeated three candidates in the primary. Soglin has served in the position since 2011, and previously held the office of Mayor in Madison from 1973 to 1979 and 1989 to 1997. He lost an election bid in March 2003.
 
Madison is also holding nonpartisan general elections for all 20 seats on the common council on Tuesday. As in the mayoral election, the candidate filing deadline was January 2. Primaries were only held on February 19 in districts where three or more candidates filed to run. These were Districts 3, 12, 13, and 15. The top two vote recipients in each race advanced to the general. In total, 11 incumbents are running for re-election to the council, with 10 of these incumbents running unopposed.
 
Madison is the second-largest city in Wisconsin and the 82nd-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 
*Nonpartisan general elections are also being held for Wisconsin school boards. Ballotpedia is covering races for 21 seats across seven school districts in 2019. Collectively, these districts served 123,027 students during the 2016-2017 school year. The largest of these districts is Milwaukee Public Schools, which served 76,206 students during the same time period.
 
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Special primaries on March 26 for California Senate vacancies

On March 26, 2019, special primary elections will be held for California State Senate Districts 1 and 33. If no candidate wins a majority of the vote in the primary, a general election will take place on June 4. Candidates wishing to run in these elections were required to file by January 31.
 
The special election for District 1 was called after Ted Gaines (R) was elected to serve on the California State Board of Equalization in November 2018. Six candidates have filed for the position – two Democrats and four Republicans.
 
In District 33 of the California State Senate, Ricardo Lara (D) vacated the seat after he was elected to serve as the insurance commissioner of California in November 2018. A field of 12 candidates are vying for the seat. Of those candidates, nine are Democrats, two are Republicans, and one is a member of the Green Party.
 
These are the only California state legislative special elections called in 2019 so far. If there is a vacancy in the California State Legislature, the governor must call for a special election within 14 days of the vacancy. No special election can be held if the vacancy happens in an election year and the nominating deadline passes.
 
The California State Senate currently has 28 Democrats, 10 Republicans, and 2 vacancies. California has a Democratic trifecta. A state government trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and both state legislative chambers. Democrats gained a trifecta in California as a result of the 2010 election when they won the governor’s office.
 


Massachusetts mayor loses recall but wins election on same night

On March 12, 2019, an effort in Fall River, Massachusetts, to recall Mayor Jasiel Correia II was approved. However, on the same night, Correia was also elected to serve as mayor of the city again.
 
According to The Herald News, Correia qualified to run as a candidate to be mayor in case the recall vote was successful. On the first portion of the ballot, Correia was recalled with 7,829 votes cast in favor of the recall and 4,911 votes cast in opposition to the recall. The second portion of the ballot allowed voters to choose who should serve as mayor if the recall vote succeeded. Correia received more votes than his four opponents and will retain his position. He won by a plurality with 4,808 (35.4%) of the total votes cast. Runner-up Paul Coogan received 4,567 votes (33.6%), Joe Camara won 1,971 votes (14.5%), Kyle Riley won 1,460 votes (10.8%), and Erica Scott-Pacheo won 740 votes (5.5%).
 
Petitioners began the recall process after Correia was arrested on October 11, 2018, on 13 charges of wire and tax fraud related to his company SnoOwl. In a press conference following the indictment, Correia said he was innocent of the charges and that he would not resign from office. He said the voters of Fall River should let him continue to serve or recall him.
 


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