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Marielle Bricker

Marielle Bricker is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Colorado, Oklahoma, and Utah to hold congressional primaries June 30

The statewide primaries for Colorado, Oklahoma, and Utah are on June 30, 2020. The filing deadline to run passed in March for Colorado and Utah and in April for Oklahoma.

One U.S. Senate seat and seven U.S. House seats are up for election in Colorado. A Democratic and Republican primary is being held for each seat. All eight incumbents are running for re-election, leaving no open seats. Seven incumbents are unopposed in their primaries; Rep. Scott Tipton (R-3) faces one challenger, Lauren Boebert. Entering the 2020 election, Colorado has one Democratic U.S. senator, one Republican U.S. senator, and four Democratic and three Republican U.S. representatives.

One U.S. Senate and five U.S. House seats are up for election in Oklahoma. In Oklahoma, unopposed candidates automatically advance to the general election. The 3rd Congressional District has no primaries on the ballot, the 2nd Congressional District does not have a Democratic primary on the ballot, and the 1st Congressional District does not have a Republican primary on the ballot. All six incumbents are running for re-election, leaving no open seats. U.S. Representatives Kevin Hern (R-1) and Frank Lucas (R-3) faced no primary opposition and advanced automatically to the general election. Entering the 2020 election, Oklahoma has two Republican U.S. senators and one Democratic and four Republican U.S. representatives.

Four U.S. House seats are up for election in Utah. In Utah, the Democratic and Republican parties hold conventions to choose their Congressional candidates. If no convention candidates receive 60% of the vote or if additional candidates petition to get on the ballot, a primary is held. The 1st Congressional district is holding both Democratic and Republican primaries, and the 4th Congressional district is holding a Republican primary. The remaining districts’ major party candidates were decided at the convention. Three of the four incumbents are running for re-election. Rep. Rob Bishop (R-1) did not file for re-election as he is running for Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Entering the 2020 election, Utah has two Republican U.S. senators and one Democratic and three Republican U.S. representatives.

Candidates are competing to advance to the general election scheduled for November 3, 2020. If no candidates receive a majority of the vote in the Oklahoma primary, the two highest vote-getters will advance to a primary runoff on August 25, 2020. Colorado and Utah do not hold primary runoffs.

These states’ primaries are the 27th, 28th, and 29th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next primary is on July 7 in New Jersey.

Entering the 2020 election, the U.S. Senate has 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democratic Party. Thirty-three of the 100 U.S. Senate seats are up for regular election, and two seats are up for special election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. The U.S. House of Representatives has 233 Democrats, 197 Republicans, one Libertarian, and four vacancies. All 435 U.S. House seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

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Primary runoff in North Carolina is June 23

The statewide primary runoff for North Carolina is on June 23, 2020. The primary was held March 3, 2020, and candidates needed more than 30% of the vote to advance to the general election. The primary runoff was originally scheduled for May 12, 2020, but was postponed amid the coronavirus pandemic. The filing deadline to run passed on December 20, 2019.

Candidates are running in a Republican primary runoff for North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District. Lynda Bennett (R) and Madison Cawthorn (R) are competing to advance to the general election scheduled for November 3, 2020. Bennett received 22.7% of the Republican primary vote, and Cawthorn received 20.4%. No other North Carolina congressional seat advanced to a primary runoff.

South Carolina also scheduled its primary runoff election for June 23, but no congressional races advanced to a primary runoff.

Entering the 2020 election, North Carolina’s U.S. House delegation consists of three Democrats, nine Republicans, and one vacancy. The U.S. House has 233 Democrats, 197 Republicans, one Libertarian, and four vacancies. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

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Voters decide state executive, legislative primaries in five states June 9

Five states held statewide primaries on June 9: Georgia, Nevada, North Dakota, South Carolina, and West Virginia. There were 684 seats on the ballot, including 23 state executive seats, 152 state senate seats, 493 state house seats, 14 state court seats, and two special state legislative seats.

The following information was current as of June 11. At that time, some races were still too close to call and results from Nevada were not yet final because the election was held largely by mail. Across the five states, 590 incumbents filed for re-election. Preliminary results indicate at least 16 incumbents were defeated, all state legislative officeholders.

Sixteen state executive incumbents filed for re-election to the 23 seats on the ballot. Of the 16 incumbents on the ballot, none lost their bids. The results for two seats were not yet known.

Of the 14 state court judges with seats up for election in 2020, only two did not seek re-election. Results from two races were not yet known, but none of the remaining 10 judges lost their seats.

In the state senate elections, 131 incumbents were on the ballot for re-election to 152 seats. At least three did not advance to the general election. In the state house elections, 431 incumbents competed for re-election to 493 seats. Thirteen lost their bids, but this number may grow as results are finalized.

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June 2 election review: Congressional primaries

Eight states and the District of Columbia held congressional primaries on June 2, 2020. Fifty-two seats were on the ballots, including five U.S. Senate seats, 46 U.S. House seats, and one nonvoting U.S. House seat. Cumulatively, 288 candidates were on the ballot.

Forty-six incumbents were on the ballot, 22 of whom were Democrats and 24 of whom were Republicans. One incumbent, Iowa Rep. Steve King (R), was defeated in the primary. King was one of 21 opposed incumbents. Twenty-five incumbents did not face primary challengers, and six seats were open.

The District of Columbia had one nonvoting U.S. House seat on the ballot.
• 1 Democratic incumbent was unopposed
• No open seat

Iowa had one U.S. Senate seat and four U.S. House seats on the ballot.
• 2 Democratic incumbents were unopposed
• 2 Republican incumbents filed for re-election; 1 faced primary challengers
• Incumbent Steve King (R) lost his bid for re-election
• 1 open seat

Idaho had one U.S. Senate seat and two U.S. House seats on the ballot.
• 3 Republican incumbents filed for re-election; 2 faced primary challengers
• No open seats

Indiana had nine U.S. House seats on the ballot.
• 1 Democratic incumbent faced a primary challenger
• 6 Republican incumbents filed for re-election; 3 faced primary challengers
• 2 open seats

Maryland had eight U.S. House seats on the ballot.
• 7 Democratic incumbents faced primary challengers
• 1 Republican incumbent faced a primary challenger
• No open seats

Montana had one U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat on the ballot.
• 1 Republican incumbent faced primary challengers
• 1 open seat

New Mexico had one U.S. Senate seat and three U.S. House seats on the ballot.
• 2 Democratic incumbents were unopposed
• 2 open seats

Pennsylvania had 18 U.S. House seats on the ballot.
• 9 Democratic incumbents filed for re-election; 2 faced primary challengers
• 9 Republican incumbents filed for re-election; 1 faced a primary challenger
• No open seats

South Dakota had one U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat on the ballot.
• 2 Republican incumbents faced primary challengers
• No open seats

Entering the 2020 election, the U.S. Senate has 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democratic Party. Only 33 out of 100 Senate seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. The U.S. House has 233 Democrats, 196 Republicans, and one Libertarian. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

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Filing period ends for congressional offices in Vermont, Wyoming

The major-party filing deadlines to run for elected office in Vermont and Wyoming passed on May 28 and May 29.

Candidates in Vermont filed for the state’s At-Large Congressional District seat.

Candidates in Wyoming filed for the following offices:
  • U.S. Senate (one seat)
  • Wyoming’s At-Large Congressional District (one seat)

U.S. Senate incumbent Mike Enzi (R) announced on May 4, 2019, that he would retire in the fall of 2020.

The primary in Vermont is scheduled for August 11, and the primary in Wyoming is scheduled for August 18. The general election in both states is scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Vermont and Wyoming’s major-party congressional filing deadlines were the 39th and 40th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next major-party congressional filing deadlines are on June 1 in Alaska, Kansas, and Wisconsin.

Entering the 2020 election, the Democratic Party holds the At-Large Congressional District seat from Vermont, and the Republican Party holds the U.S. Senate and At-Large Congressional District seats from Wyoming.

The U.S. Senate has 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democratic Party. Only 33 out of 100 Senate seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. The U.S. House has 233 Democrats, 196 Republicans, and one Libertarian. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

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Eight states to hold primaries on June 2 after four states push primaries back from April and May

Eight states are holding statewide primaries on June 2, 2020: Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Montana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and South Dakota. Four states did not originally plan to hold primaries on this date, but postponed them amid the coronavirus pandemic. Maryland and Pennsylvania’s primaries were originally scheduled for April 28, Indiana’s primary was scheduled for May 5, and Idaho’s primary was scheduled for May 19.

Three states are holding their primaries largely by mail instead of in-person due to the pandemic. Idaho maintained its original election day, May 19, as the final day for voters to register to vote and request mail-in ballots. June 2 is the deadline for county clerks to receive mail-in ballots. All counties in Montana opted to conduct their primaries by mail after a state directive gave them the authority and choice to do so. Maryland is also conducting its primary largely by mail.

Three states expanded absentee voting in response to Covid-19. In Indiana, the regular absentee voting eligibility requirements were temporarily suspended, meaning all voters can request to vote by mail. Iowa and South Dakota, which have no-excuse absentee voting, sent absentee ballot applications to all registered voters. Iowa also extended the absentee voting period from 29 days before the election to 40 days.

In addition to moving its primary date, Pennsylvania is allowing counties to begin tabulating absentee ballots before 8 p.m. on election day and counties can temporarily consolidate polling places. In Pennsylvania, all voters are eligible to cast absentee ballots.

No changes to the statewide primary were announced for New Mexico amid the coronavirus pandemic. The state does not have eligibility requirements to vote absentee.

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Eastman wins Nebraska’s 2nd Congressional District Democratic primary

The statewide primary for Nebraska was held on May 12, 2020. Candidates competed to advance to the general election scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Candidates ran in primaries for one U.S. Senate seat and three U.S. House seats.

In the U.S. Senate Republican primary, incumbent Ben Sasse (R) faced one challenger and received 75% of the vote, advancing to the general election. Chris Janicek (D) won the Democratic primary after facing six challengers. Janicek advanced to the general election, receiving 31% of the vote.

In the U.S. House District 1 primaries, incumbent Jeffrey Fortenberry (R), Kate Bolz (D), and Dennis Grace (L) advanced to the general election. Bolz was the only primary winner to run in a contested race.

In the U.S. House District 2 primaries, incumbent Don Bacon (R), Kara Eastman (D), and Tyler Schaeffer (L) advanced to the general election. Schaeffer was the only winner to run unopposed.

In the U.S. House District 3 primaries, incumbent Adrian Smith (R), Mark Elworth Jr. (D), and Dustin Hobbs (L) advanced to the general election. Smith was the only primary winner to run in a contested race.

Nebraska’s primary was the 9th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next primary is on May 19 in Oregon.

Going into the 2020 elections, both U.S. Senate seats and all three U.S. House seats in Nebraska are held by Republicans. The U.S. Senate has 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democrats. Only 33 out of 100 Senate seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. The U.S. House has 233 Democrats, 196 Republicans, one Libertarian, and five vacancies. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

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Filing period for congressional candidates to end in Washington state

The filing deadline to run for elected office in Washington is on May 15, 2020. In Washington, prospective candidates may file for all 10 of the state’s U.S. House seats.

The primary is scheduled for August 4, and the general election is scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Washington’s statewide filing deadline is the 38th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on May 28 in Vermont.

Heading into the election, the Democratic Party holds both U.S. Senate seats and seven of the 10 congressional seats from Washington. The U.S. House has 233 Democrats, 196 Republicans, one Libertarian, and five vacancies. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

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1 of 109 state-level incumbents defeated in Ohio’s primaries

Ohio held a statewide primary on April 28, 2020. Originally scheduled for March 17, the election was postponed amid concerns of the coronavirus pandemic. The general election is November 3, 2020.

The primary was held largely by mail. As of 1 p.m. EDT on May 1, the Secretary of State’s office reported that there were 244,061 outstanding absentee and provisional ballots statewide. The following information is based on the unofficial results reported at that time.

A total of 16 out of 33 seats on the Ohio State Senate are up for election in 2020. Five incumbents, all Republicans, were not on the ballot. Of the 11 officeholders to file for re-election, two are Democrats and nine are Republicans. District 14 Sen. Terry Johnson (R) was the only incumbent to face a primary challenger. No incumbents were defeated.

All 99 Ohio House of Representatives districts are up for election in 2020. Nineteen incumbents—five Democrats and 14 Republicans—were not on the ballot. Of the 80 incumbents to file for re-election, 33 are Democrats and 47 are Republicans. Thirteen incumbents faced primary challengers. District 43 Rep. Jeffrey Todd Smith (R) was the only incumbent to be defeated.

Two Ohio Supreme Court justices have terms expiring in 2020. In Ohio, judicial candidates stand for partisan primaries and nonpartisan general elections. Justices Judith French (R) and Sharon L. Kennedy (R) both filed for another term, facing no primary challengers. They both face Democratic challengers in the general election.

Twenty-one Ohio Court of Appeals justices have terms expiring in 2021. Sixteen justices filed for another term, eight Democrats and eight Republicans. Justice Matt Lynch (R) is challenging Justice Timothy Cannon (D) for Cannon’s seat; Lynch’s term does not expire until 2025. Six seats are open. All 16 incumbents advanced to the nonpartisan general election.

Ballotpedia also covered elections for the following municipalities:
  • Cuyahoga County
  • Fairfield County
  • Franklin County
  • Hamilton County
  • Lucas County


Local candidate filing deadline to end in Massachusetts May 5

The local filing deadline to run for elected office in Massachusetts is on May 5, 2020. In Massachusetts, candidates must file their collected nomination signatures with local election entities four weeks before filing with the Secretary of the Commonwealth. In response to the coronavirus pandemic, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court issued an order that reduced candidate petition signature requirements to 50 percent of their statutory requirements. Prospective candidates may file for the following offices:

  • U.S. Senate (1 seat)
  • U.S. House (9 seats)
  • Governor’s Council (8 seats)
  • Massachusetts State Senate (40 seats)
  • Massachusetts House of Representatives (160 seats)

The primary is scheduled for September 1, and the general election is scheduled for November 3, 2020. Candidates who filed with their local election entities must also file with the Secretary of the Commonwealth by June 2, 2020.

Massachusetts’ statewide filing deadline is the 37th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on May 8 in Michigan.

Massachusetts has a divided government, and no political party holds a state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.

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