Author

Megan Feeney

Megan Feeney is a staff writer at Ballotpedia and can be reached at megan.feeney@ballotpedia.org.

Voters decide municipal and school board races in Chesapeake and Norfolk, Virginia

Chesapeake and Norfolk, Virginia, held nonpartisan general elections for municipal and school board offices on May 19, 2020.

Candidates ran in elections for the following offices:

Mayor of Chesapeake
• Incumbent Richard West defeated Lenard Myers, Steffanie Aubuchon, and Palmer Smith.

Chesapeake City Council
• Don Carey III and incumbents S.Z. Ritter and Robert Ike won at-large seats on the nine-member council.

Chesapeake School Board
• Angie Swygert and incumbents Samuel Boone, Victoria Proffitt, and Tom Mercer won at-large seats on the nine-member school board.

Mayor of Norfolk
• Incumbent Kenny Alexander ran unopposed.

Norfolk City Council
• Incumbents Andria McClellan and Angelia Williams Graves won re-election to their city council seats in Superwards 6 and 7, respectively. Both ran unopposed.

Norfolk School Board
• Incumbents Noelle Gabriel and Rodney Jordan won re-election to the school board in Superwards 6 and 7, respectively.

Norfolk and Chesapeake are the second- and third-most populous cities in Virginia and the 80th- and 90th-most populous in the U.S.

Together, the Norfolk and Chesapeake school districts served a total of 71,422 students during the 2017-2018 school year.

Additional reading:



Filing deadline passes to run for U.S. House in Washington

On May 15, 2020, the filing deadline passed to run for congressional offices in Washington. Candidates filed for each of Washington’s 10 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives.

The primary is scheduled for August 4, 2020, and the general election is scheduled for November 3.

Washington’s statewide filing deadline was the 38th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on May 28 in Vermont.

Heading into the 2020 election, Washington’s congressional delegation includes seven Democrats and three Republicans. As of May 5, 2020, the U.S. House has 233 Democrats, 196 Republicans, one Libertarian, and five vacancies. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

Additional Reading:



Filing deadline approaches for Texas State Senate District 14 special election

Candidates interested in running in the special election for Texas State Senate District 14 have until May 13, 2020, to file. The special general election is scheduled for July 14, 2020.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Governor Greg Abbott (R) scheduled the election for July instead of May 2, when it would normally have been held.

The special election was called after Kirk Watson (D) left office on April 30 to become the dean of the University of Houston’s Hobby School of Public Affairs. Watson served from 2007 to 2020.

As of May 2020, 43 state legislative special elections have been scheduled for 2020 in 20 states. Between 2011 and 2019, an average of 77 special elections took place each year. Texas held 32 state legislative special elections from 2010 to 2019.

Entering the 2020 election year, the Texas State Senate has 11 Democrats, 19 Republicans, and one vacancy. A majority in the chamber requires 16 seats. Texas has a Republican state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.



Ohio holds Congressional primaries

Ohio held primaries for each of its 16 U.S. House seats on April 28, 2020. The general election will be held on November 3.

The following results are based on the Ohio Secretary of State’s unofficial election results report at 3 p.m. EDT on April 30. The Secretary of State’s office reported that there were 244,061 outstanding absentee and provisional ballots at that time.

  • District 1: Kate Schroder defeated Nikki Foster with 68% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Incumbent Steve Chabot (R) and Kevin Kahn (Libertarian) ran unopposed.
  • District 2: Jaime Castle (D) ran unopposed. Incumbent Brad Wenstrup defeated H. Robert Harris with 94% of the vote in the Republican primary.
  • District 3: Incumbent Joyce Beatty defeated Morgan Harper with 68% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Mark Richardson defeated Cleophus Dulaney with 86% of the vote in the Republican primary.
  • District 4: Shannon Freshour defeated Jeffrey Sites and Mike Larsen with 48% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Incumbent Jim Jordan (R) and Steve Perkins (Libertarian) ran unopposed.
  • District 5: Nick Rubando defeated Xavier Carrigan and Gene Redinger with 51% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Incumbent Bob Latta (R) ran unopposed.
  • District 6: Shawna Roberts (D) ran unopposed. Incumbent Bill Johnson defeated Kenneth Morgan with 87% of the vote in the Republican primary.
  • District 7: Incumbent Bob Gibbs (R), Quentin Potter (D), and Brandon Lape (Libertarian) ran unopposed.
  • District 8: Vanessa Enoch defeated Matthew Guyette with 79% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Incumbent Warren Davidson defeated Edward Meer with 91% of the vote in the Republican primary.
  • District 9: Incumbent Marcy Kaptur defeated Peter Rosewicz with 91% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Rob Weber defeated Charles Barrett, Timothy Corrigan, and Tim Connors with 60% of the vote in the Republican primary.
  • District 10: Desiree Tims defeated Eric Moyer with 70% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Incumbent Michael Turner defeated John Anderson and Kathi Flanders with 87% of the vote in the Republican primary.
  • District 11: Incumbent Marcia Fudge defeated Michael Hood, Tariq Shabazz, and James Jerome Bell with 91% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Laverne Gore defeated Jonah Schulz and Shalira Taylor with 48% of the vote in the Republican primary.
  • District 12: Alaina Shearer defeated Jennifer Bell with 59% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Incumbent Troy Balderson defeated Tim Day with 84% of the vote in the Republican primary. John Stewart (Libertarian) ran unopposed.
  • District 13: Christina Hagan defeated six other candidates in the Republican primary with 66% of the vote. Incumbent Tim Ryan (D) and Michael Fricke (Libertarian) ran unopposed.
  • District 14: Hillary O’Connor Mueri (D) ran unopposed. Incumbent David Joyce defeated Mark Pitrone with 83% of the vote in the Republican primary.
  • District 15: Joel Newby defeated Daniel Kilgore with 66% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Incumbent Steve Stivers defeated Shelby Hunt with 88% of the vote in the Republican primary.
  • District 16: Aaron Godfrey defeated Ronald Karpus with 67% of the vote in the Democratic primary. Incumbent Anthony Gonzalez (R) ran unopposed.
Additional reading:


Special election for Maryland’s 7th Congressional District to be held April 28

The special general election for Maryland’s 7th Congressional District is on April 28, 2020. The election will be conducted primarily via mail. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Maryland Board of Elections sent mail-in ballots to all eligible active voters. Three polling places will be open on April 28 for those who cannot vote by mail.

Kim Klacik (R) and Kweisi Mfume (D) are competing in the special election. The filing deadline to run passed on November 20, 2019. The Democratic and Republican primaries were held on February 4, 2020.

The special election was called after Elijah Cummings (D) died on October 17, 2019. Cummings served from 1996 until his death.

As of April 23, 2020, nine special elections have been called during the 116th Congress. Seven of those were called for seats in the U.S. House, and two were called for seats in the U.S. Senate. From the 113th Congress to the 115th Congress, 40 special elections were held.

Additional reading:


Filing deadline approaches for state and judicial races in Michigan and Florida

The major party filing deadline to run for elected office in Michigan is on April 21, 2020, and the filing deadline to run for certain local judicial offices in Florida is on April 24.

In Michigan, prospective candidates may file for the following state offices:
• State Board of Education (2 seats)
• University of Michigan Board of Regents (2 seats)
• Michigan State University Board of Trustees (2 seats)
• Wayne State University Board of Governors (2 seats)
• Michigan House of Representatives (all 110 seats)
• Michigan House of Representatives District 4 special election

Ballotpedia is also covering local elections in Wayne County, Michigan.

Prospective candidates in Florida may file for the following offices:
• Orange County: Public Defender and State Attorney
• Jacksonville: 4th Circuit Court judges (12 seats) and Duval County Court judges (5 seats)

In 2020, Florida will also hold retention elections for one seat on the Florida Supreme Court and 23 seats on the Florida District Court of Appeals. The filing deadline to run for state legislative offices in Florida is June 12, 2020.

The Michigan primary is scheduled for August 4, and the Florida primary is scheduled for August 18. The general election in both states is scheduled for November 3.

Michigan and Florida’s statewide filing deadlines are the 35th and 36th to take place in the 2020 election cycle.

Additional links:
Florida local trial court judicial elections, 2020
Michigan elections, 2020



Statewide filing deadline approaches in Michigan

The major party filing deadline to run for elected office in Michigan is on April 21, 2020. In Michigan, prospective candidates may file for the following offices:
• U.S. Senate (1 seat)
• U.S. House (all 14 seats)
• State Board of Education (2 seats)
• University of Michigan Board of Regents (2 seats)
• Michigan State University Board of Trustees (2 seats)
• Wayne State University Board of Governors (2 seats)
• Michigan House of Representatives (all 110 seats)

Ballotpedia is also covering local elections in the following areas:
• Wayne County, Michigan
• Detroit Public Schools Community District
• Dearborn Public Schools
• Ann Arbor Public Schools

The primary is scheduled for August 4, 2020, and the general election is scheduled for November 3, 2020.

The filing deadline has so far been unaffected by the coronavirus pandemic. Ballotpedia is tracking changes in election dates, procedures, and administration.

Michigan’s statewide filing deadline is the 35th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on April 24 in Florida.

Michigan has a divided government, which means that no party holds a state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.

Additional Reading:
Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Michigan
United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan, 2020
United States Senate election in Michigan, 2020
Michigan state executive official elections, 2020
Michigan House of Representatives elections, 2020



Filing period for congressional races ends in six states

The major party filing period for congressional races has ended in six states over the past week.

  • New Jersey and South Carolina: March 30
  • Missouri and South Dakota: March 31
  • New York and Tennessee: April 2

All six states are holding U.S. House elections for each of their congressional districts. In addition, New Jersey, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Tennessee are holding elections for one seat each in the U.S. Senate.

These filing deadlines were not moved in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Ballotpedia is tracking changes to election dates and procedures.

The general election in each state is on November 3, 2020. The primaries in New Jersey and South Dakota are scheduled for June 2. The remaining primaries are scheduled as follows:

  • South Carolina: June 9
  • New York: June 23
  • Missouri: August 4
  • Tennessee: August 6

These filing deadlines were the 26th through the 31st to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on April 6 in Arizona.

Entering the 2020 election year, the U.S. Senate had 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democratic Party. Only 33 out of 100 Senate seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. Meanwhile, entering the 2020 election year, the U.S. House had 232 Democrats, 197 Republicans, 5 vacancies, and 1 independent. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

Additional reading:


Filing period for congressional races to end in six states

The major party filing period for congressional races will end in six states over the next week. These include:
• New Jersey and South Carolina: March 30
• Missouri and South Dakota: March 31
• New York and Tennessee: April 2

All six states will hold U.S. House elections for each of their congressional districts. In addition, New Jersey, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Tennessee will hold elections for one seat each in the U.S. Senate.

These filing deadlines have so far not been moved in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Ballotpedia is tracking changes to election dates and procedures.

The general election in each state is scheduled for November 3, 2020. The primaries in New Jersey and South Dakota are scheduled for June 2. The remaining primaries are scheduled as follows:
• South Carolina: June 9
• New York: June 23
• Missouri: August 4
• Tennessee: August 6

These filing deadlines are the 26th through the 31st to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on April 6 in Arizona.

Entering the 2020 election year, the U.S. Senate has 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democratic Party. Only 33 out of 100 Senate seats are up for regular election, and two are up for special election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. The U.S. House has 232 Democrats, 197 Republicans, five vacancies, and one independent. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

Additional reading:
United States House of Representatives elections, 2020
United States Senate elections, 2020
Changes to election dates, procedures, and administration in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, 2020
Ballotpedia’s Elections Analysis Hub, 2020



Trump signs coronavirus relief bill into law

President Donald Trump (R) signed into law a coronavirus relief bill in the evening of March 18, 2020. The bill had been passed in the U.S. Senate earlier in the day by a margin of 90–8. The law provides funding for paid sick leave, free coronavirus testing, expanded unemployment insurance, and food assistance programs.



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