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Second veto referendum effort filed targeting provisions of Oregon HB 3427, the Student Success Act

Two referendum petitions have been filed targeting House Bill 3427, referred to as the Student Success Act, which was signed into law on May 16, 2019.
 
HB 3427 was designed to establish the Fund for Student Success and allocate funding to education purposes including the following:
  • the creation of a grant program in the state’s Student Investment Account with funds to be spent on increased learning time, decreased class sizes, and improvements to students’ education, healthy, and safety;
  • the expansion of access to free meals at school; and
  • the creation of a program for students who have left high school to re-enter and complete high school.
The bill establishes a 0.57% tax (corporate activity tax) on businesses that have more than a million dollars in Oregon sales and reduces personal income tax rates for the lowest three tax brackets by subtracting 0.25% from the rates.
 
The first referendum, #301, seeks to overturn provisions of HB 3427 that levy a 0.57% tax (corporate activity tax) on businesses that have more than a million dollars in Oregon sales with revenue to be used to fund the Fund for Student Success. Defeat the Tax on Oregon Sales is leading the veto referendum effort. Our Oregon is leading the campaign against the referendum effort in order to preserve HB 3427 provisions.
 
Oregon Senator Alan Olsen (R-20), who opposes the corporate activity tax and supports the referendum effort, argued, “The funds from the gross receipts tax are not dedicated to funding K-12 education by constitutional amendment, meaning the Democratic majority can spend it however they choose. Because it’s a statutory law, it is not guaranteed to education or K-12 programs like the Democrats have promised. Additionally, this tax will absolutely devastate Oregonians with fixed incomes, such as the poor and elderly – the very populations Democrats claim to represent – because consumers are paying for the sales tax every time something is purchased.”
 
Our Oregon argued, “Special interests have filed an attempt to send the Student Success Act to the ballot, jeopardizing a historic $2 billion investment in Oregon students. These dedicated investments mean smaller class sizes, more mental health resources, restored art, music, PE, and career training classes, and increased access to early education programs. The Student Success Act also delivers hundreds of millions in personal income tax relief for families across the state.”
 
The second referendum, #302, seeks to overturn Section 67 of HB 3427, which would prohibit cities, counties, or other local political subdivisions from imposing taxes on commercial activities or grocery sales.
 
74,680 valid signatures are due for each measure 90 days after the legislature adjourns its 2019 session. The legislature is set to adjourn at the end of June.
 
In the 112-year period between 1906 and 2018, 68 veto referendum measures have appeared on the ballot in Oregon. Veto referendums resulted in the targeted law being overturned in 44 of 68 cases for a veto referendum success rate of 64.7%. The targeted law was upheld in 24 of 68 veto referendum elections (35.3%).
 
The states that have had the most veto referendums are North Dakota (75), Oregon (68), and California (48).
 
Additional reading:


Trump picks Melania’s spokeswoman for new press secretary

Donald Trump chose Melania Trump spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham to serve as his White House press secretary Tuesday. Grisham will replace Sarah Huckabee Sanders, whose last day will be Friday.
 
The First Lady said in a tweet: “I am pleased to announce @StephGrisham45 will be the next @PressSec & Comms Director! She has been with us since 2015 – @potus & I can think of no better person to serve the Administration & our country. Excited to have Stephanie working for both sides of the @WhiteHouse.”
 
Grisham is Melania Trump’s deputy chief of staff for communications and will continue to serve in that role when she becomes press secretary. She was a member of Trump’s presidential transition team and worked on former presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s campaign.
 


The Daily Brew: The first presidential debate of the 2020 cycle is here!

Today’s Brew highlights the details regarding the first set of presidential debates + three Idaho school board members face an August 27 recall election  
The Daily Brew

Welcome to the Wednesday, June 26, Brew. Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. First Democratic presidential debate takes place tonight
  2. Voters to decide whether to recall three Idaho school board members
  3. Cabán wins election for Queens District Attorney

First Democratic presidential debate takes place tonight

The first Democratic presidential debate takes place tonight in Miami. Over the next two nights, 20 candidates—10 each night—will participate. This will be the first of 12 Democratic primary debates scheduled for the 2020 presidential election cycle. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) used a random drawing to distribute the candidates across both debate nights. 

The Democratic party is holding more primary debates and starting them earlier than the last election cycle. The first Democratic primary debate in the 2016 election was held on October 13, 2015, and the DNC sponsored nine debates altogether. There were 12 Republican debates last cycle and the first one took place August 6, 2015.

The highest-polling candidates in qualifying polls will be positioned in the center of the stage each night. Elizabeth Warren and Beto O’Rourke will be in the middle at tonight’s debate and Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders will be center stage on Thursday.

The debate will be hosted by NBC, MSNBC, and Telemundo and streamed on NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, and all Telemundo digital platforms. It will be held from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. ET. Candidates will have 60 seconds to answer questions posed by the moderators, and 30 seconds to reply to follow-up questions. Participants can make closing statements but there will be no opening remarks.

Here are the candidates who will be in tonight’s debate:

And here are the candidates who will be in Thursday night’s debate:

The candidates all met one or both qualifying thresholds to participate. Candidates qualified by receiving 1% support or more in three eligible national or early state polls—Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, and/or Nevada. Candidates could also qualify by providing verifiable evidence that they received donations from at least 65,000 unique donors with a minimum of 200 donors per state in at least 20 states.

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Voters to decide whether to recall three Idaho school board members

This Friday, Ballotpedia will release its annual mid-year recall report, where we’ll take a closer look at the recall trends across the country so far this year, and compare them to prior years. Just to give you a small taste, here’s an update on a recent recall effort in Idaho. 

Recall efforts against Tim Winkle, Alicia McConkie, and Marianne Blackwell of the Middleton School District board of trustees in Idaho were certified by the Canyon County Elections Office earlier this month and will appear before voters on August 27.

Recall organizer David Morgan said the effort against Winkle and McConkie was prompted after they voted to accept the superintendent’s personnel recommendations—which did not renew the contract of the high school principal—at a May 6 board meeting. The recall petition against Blackwell said she “set an unprofessional and unacceptable precedent for school board trustees” and violated the board’s code of ethics.

Recall supporters also targeted another board member—Kirk Adams—but the petition was rejected by the county because he had not yet served 90 days in office. The school board’s fifth member resigned in April due to personal reasons.

Winkle said that since the decision not to renew the principal’s contract was a personnel matter, the board was limited in what they could share with the public. McConkie said she has served the best she could for the last two years and felt she was being targeted for recall over a single decision. Blackwell has not responded to the recall effort against her.

In order for the Middleton School District board members to be removed from office, a majority of voters must vote in favor in the recall election. Additionally, the number of voters who cast ballots in favor of the recall must also be higher than the total number of people who voted for the officeholders when they were last up for election. In the May 2017 election, 253 voters cast ballots in McConkie’s district and 82 cast ballots in Blackwell’s district. 

In 2018, Ballotpedia covered a total of 206 recall efforts against 299 elected officials.Of the 123 officials whose recalls made it to the ballot, 77 were recalled for a rate of 62.6 percent. That was higher than the 56.9 percent rate and 56.3 percent rate for 2017 and 2016 recalls, respectively.


Cabán wins election for Queens District Attorney

Public defender Tiffany Cabán won the Democratic primary election for Queens County District Attorney. Former Queens County District Attorney Richard Brown (D)-who announced in January that he would not run for re-election-died in May after serving in the office for 28 years. Queens County is the state designation for the Borough of Queens in New York City.

Cabán defeated five other Democratic primary candidates and will face attorney Daniel Kogan (R) in the November 5 general election.

The primary attracted national attention and endorsements from two presidential candidates.

Local election watchers had identified Cabán, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, and former Judge Gregory Lasak as frontrunners. 

Cabán was endorsed by Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D), and The New York Times.

Katz was endorsed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D), four members of the U.S. House, the county Democratic Party, and City Councilor Rory Lancman (D), who dropped out of the race June 21. Former Rep. Joseph Crowley, whom Ocasio-Cortez unseated in 2018, fundraised on Katz’s behalf. 

Lasak was endorsed by the New York Daily News, the New York Post, and Rep. Kathleen Rice (D). 

Also running were attorney Betty Lugo, former New York City Civilian Complaint Review Board director Mina Malik, and prosecutor Jose Nieves. 

 

 



Cabán wins election for Queens District Attorney

Public defender Tiffany Cabán won the Democratic primary election for Queens County District Attorney. Former Queens County District Attorney Richard Brown (D)-who announced in January that he would not run for re-election-died in May after serving in the office for 28 years. Queens County is the state designation for the Borough of Queens in New York City.
 
Cabán defeated five other Democratic primary candidates and will face attorney Daniel Kogan (R) in the November 5 general election.
 
The primary attracted national attention and endorsements from two presidential candidates.
 
Local election watchers had identified Cabán, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, and former Judge Gregory Lasak as frontrunners.
 
Cabán was endorsed by Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D), and The New York Times.
 
Katz was endorsed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D), four members of the U.S. House, the county Democratic Party, and City Councilor Rory Lancman (D), who dropped out of the race June 21. Former Rep. Joseph Crowley, whom Ocasio-Cortez unseated in 2018, fundraised on Katz’s behalf.
 
Lasak was endorsed by the New York Daily News, the New York Post, and Rep. Kathleen Rice (D).
 
Also running were attorney Betty Lugo, former New York City Civilian Complaint Review Board director Mina Malik, and prosecutor Jose Nieves.


Keller outraised Friedenberg 3:1 in PA-12 special election

Based on final figures released by the Federal Election Commission, Fred Keller raised more than $600,000 to Marc Friedenberg’s $200,000 in the special election for Pennsylvania’s 12th Congressional District. Keller won the election with 68 percent of the vote to Friedenberg’s 32 percent.
 
Keller was sworn in on June 3, 2019, and will serve the remainder of former Rep. Tom Marino’s (R) term. Marino resigned from office on January 23, 2019, to take a job in the private sector. Of the 18-member congressional delegation from Pennsylvania, there are nine Democrats and nine Republicans.
 
So far, four special elections have been called during the 116th Congress. Three of those are for seats in the U.S. House, and one is for a seat in the U.S. Senate. From the 113th Congress to the 115th Congress, a total of 40 special elections were held.


Former Rep. Sestak (D-Pa.) announces presidential candidacy

Former Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.) announced he was running for president, bringing the number of noteworthy declared Democratic candidates to 25. This figure includes current or former elected officials and public figures. The former two-term congressman, who served 31 years in the Navy before retiring as a three-star admiral, said his priority would be addressing climate change and countering Russia and China on the international stage.
 
Sestak’s announcement makes him the first noteworthy Democratic candidate to launch a presidential bid in over a month—New York Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) launched his campaign on May 16. According to Federal Election Commission records, 259 Democrats have so far filed to run for president in 2020.
 
Sestak’s campaign launch is not late by historical standards. In 2015, 16 noteworthy major-party candidates had launched presidential campaigns as of June 23—12 Republicans and four Democrats. Seven more noteworthy candidates—Bobby Jindal (R), Chris Christie (R), Jim Webb (D), Scott Walker (R), John Kasich (R), Jim Gilmore (R), and Lawrence Lessig (D)—launched their 2016 campaigns after that date.
 
Then-Vice President Joe Biden (D), who was frequently mentioned as a potential candidate, did not rule out a bid until October 21, 2015.
 
Of the past five successful presidential candidates, both Donald Trump (R) and George W. Bush (R) launched their campaigns in June before the election year. George H.W. Bush (R) and Bill Clinton (D) launched their campaigns later, with both doing so in October in the year before the election. Of the last five presidents, only Barack Obama (D) launched his campaign prior to June before the election year, having done so in February 2007.
 
The debates this week, which will be held in Miami, are the first of 12 sets of debates planned ahead of the 2020 Democratic convention.
 


Biden leads in total pageviews and week-over-week pageview increase over June 15-22

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.
 
Former Vice President Joe Biden’s (D) campaign page on Ballotpedia received 4,624 pageviews for the week of June 16-22. Biden’s pageviews represented 8.4% of the pageviews for all Democratic candidates during the week. South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) had 7.6% of the campaign pageviews for the week, while Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) had 7.0%.
 
Biden also had the largest increase in pageviews of all the campaigns last week, increasing 37.6% over the previous week. The only other candidates with pageview increases of 25% or greater were Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) with a 37.3% increase and Sen. Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) with a 26.3% increase.
 
The top three candidates in lifetime pageviews are Buttigieg with 72,598, entrepreneur Andrew Yang (D) with 59,440, and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) with 53,693.
 
On the GOP side, former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld had 9,895 pageviews to President Trump’s 1,706.


President Trump unveils Republican counterpart to ActBlue

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

June 25, 2019: President Trump launched a Republican counterpart to Democratic fundraising site ActBlue. Bernie Sanders introduced a bill in the Senate that would cancel all outstanding federal student loans.


 

Which presidential election featured the largest popular vote margin by a winning candidate?

Notable Quote of the Day

“Interviews with nearly 20 Democratic elected officials, party chiefs, labor leaders and operatives the past week revealed an air of foreboding verging on alarm that the debates will degenerate into a two-night, bare-knuckle brawl. With the divisive 2016 Democratic primary fresh in their minds and the current presidential candidates starting to take swipes at one another, the fear is that voters will be left with the impression of a bickering, small-minded opposition party.”

— Holly Otterbein, Politico

Democrats

  • The Democratic National Committee released the rules for this week’s Miami debates. Candidates will have 60 seconds to respond to questions and 30 seconds to respond to follow-ups.

  • Michael Bennet hired former DCCC executive director Dan Sena and ad producer Scott Kozar as media consultants, also hiring pollster Pete Brodnitz.

  • Joe Biden wrote an op-ed in the Miami Herald criticizing Trump’s policies on immigration and relations with Latin America.

  • TIME Magazine published an article exploring Cory Booker’s Iowa operations.

  • Steve Bullock sat down for an interview with NBC’s Harry Smith on his top priority if elected, which would be to limit large donors’ political influence.

  • The Atlantic published an article exploring Pete Buttigieg’s response to an officer-involved shooting in South Bend, Indiana.

  • Julián Castro signed a pledge to revoke the 2001 Authorization of Military Force which has covered U.S. deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, among other areas.

  • John Delaney issued a press release on healthcare identifying cutting costs as his priority over Medicare for All and similar policies.

  • The Washington Post published an article exploring Kirsten Gillibrand’s stance on firearms regulations.

  • Mike Gravel sat for an interview with Jacobin Magazine on his political history and his proposal to create a Legislature of the People.

  • Rep. William Lacy Clay (D-Mo.) endorsed Kamala Harris.

  • Jay Inslee issued his fourth plan related to energy and the environment, the Freedom from Fossil Fuels plan.

  • Amy Klobuchar sat for an interview with NBC’s Harry Smith on her top priority if elected, which would be to improve mental healthcare and addiction treatment.

  • Seth Moulton began running ads in early voting states calling for a new generation of leadership.

  • Beto O’Rourke issued a veterans’ healthcare plan which is funded by a war tax.

  • Tim Ryan appeared on Meet the Press Daily, where he discussed Iran policy.

  • Bernie Sanders introduced a bill in the Senate Monday which would cancel all outstanding federal student loans.

  • Eric Swalwell visited a migrant detention center in Homestead, Florida.

  • CNN published a profile of Elizabeth Warren’s policy team.

  • In an appearance on The Late Show with Stephen ColbertAndrew Yangannounced he would give a third family $1,000 per month.

Republicans

  • Donald Trump unveiled WinRed, a fundraising site positioned as a counterpart to the Democratic Party’s ActBlue.

  • Bill Weld sat for an interview with The Keene Sentinel, where he discussed the goal of his campaign.

Flashback: June 25, 2015

The Supreme Court issued its ruling in King v. Burwell, upholding a portion of the Affordable Care Act providing tax credits to individuals purchasing healthcare plans from the federal exchange. TIME Magazine explored the response from Republican presidential candidates.blank



Former U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak becomes 25th notable Democratic candidate

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

June 24, 2019: On Sunday, former U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Penn.) announced he is running for president, becoming the 25th notable Democratic candidate. Twenty-two Democratic candidates spoke at the South Carolina Democratic Convention Saturday.

There are three new candidates running since last week, including two Democrats (Sestak has not yet officially filed with the Federal Election Commission, so he’s not included). Six individuals are no longer filed as candidates with the FEC, including three Democrats. In total, 748 individuals are currently filed with the FEC to run for president.

Notable Quote of the Day

“A divided vote among black Democrats, who represent 60 percent of the primary electorate in this state [South Carolina], could profoundly transform the race, leading to a drawn-out and more brutal fight for the nomination. The race could go on well past South Carolina and Super Tuesday, which are just three days apart next year and will offer the best test of candidate strength with voters of color.” 

— Jonathan Martin and Astead W. Herndon, The New York Times

Democrats

  • Twenty-two notable Democratic candidates (all but Steve Bullock and Mike Gravelspoke at the South Carolina Democratic Convention Saturday. This was a record-breaking number of presidential candidates speaking at the state party’s convention, The Greenville News reported.
  • Twenty candidates attended a forum hosted by Planned Parenthood Saturday. Eight candidates—Pete ButtigiegJulián CastroJohn HickenlooperAmy KlobucharBeto O’RourkeBernie SandersEric Swalwell, and Elizabeth Warrenparticipated in a National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) forum Friday.
  • Michael Bennet and a group of other senators introduced a bill called the Hunger-Free Summer for Kids Act of 2019 that would allow the USDA’s Summer Food Service Program to provide meals that can be eaten off-site and create an option to give parents $30 per child per summer month to buy eligible food items.
  • Joe Biden was endorsed by the Iowa Professional Fire Fighters union for the 2020 Iowa caucuses.
  • On ABC’s This Week SundayCory Booker said Trump has no strategy on Iran. Booker said that, if elected president, he would strengthen relationships with U.S. allies to denuclearize Iran.
  • Bullock campaigned in New Hampshire this weekend.
  • On Sunday, Buttigieg held a town hall in South Bend, Indiana, with police chief Scott Ruszkowski, where they responded to residents’ questions related to an officer-involved shooting that occurred June 16.
  • Castro referred to a Trump tweet saying he called off a military strike against Iran 10 minutes before it was set to happen, and to Trump delaying raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement over the weekend, as “bull**** politics.” Castro said Trump is “a political conman.”
  • John Delaney spoke about his candidacy on CBSN’s Red & Blue Friday.
  • Tulsi Gabbard discussed “ending wasteful regime change wars” as her priority on NBC’s Nightly News.
  • Kirsten Gillibrand and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Ak.) on Friday introduced a bill called the Summer Meals Act of 2019 that would expand eligibility for the USDA’s Summer Food Service Program and provide transportation for children to meal sites.
  • Related to an officer-involved shooting in South Bend, Indiana, Mike Gravel tweeted, “The media has given Buttigieg a pass on a lackluster record in South Bend that shows him to be more concerned about public acclaim than the lives of average people. Why the pass? Because he’s an articulate white kid with all the right credentials. His constituents know the truth.”
  • Kamala Harris on CBS’ Face the Nation criticized Trump’s approach to Iran and said the U.S. should re-enter the Iran nuclear deal. She also discussed tensions within the Democratic Party over whether to begin impeachment proceedings against Trump.
  • Hickenlooper said at Friday’s NALEO forum that people living in the country without legal permission should be given 10-year visas.
  • Jay Inslee is in Everglades Holiday Park in Florida today, where his campaign said he’ll make a major policy announcement.
  • Wayne Messam was interviewed on Caribbean Riddims, a South Florida radio show.
  • Seth Moulton criticized Trump’s Iran strategy. Moulton said if he were president, he would “respond to Iran by turning off the power in the grid in the southern part of the country where the Iranian missile system is based,” Roll Call reported.
  • Politico reported that O’Rourke hired Carmel Martin as his national policy director. Martin served as policy adviser to John Kerry’s and Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaigns; she has also worked for the Department of Education and the Center for American Progress.
  • Tim Ryan on MSNBC’s Saturday Night Politics discussed the upcoming Democratic debate, the economy, and Iran. He criticized Trump for withdrawing from the Iran nuclear deal.
  • Sanders said at Friday’s NALEO forum that his Medicare for All plan would include healthcare for people in the country without legal permission.
  • Joe Sestak announced he is running for president. In his announcement video, Sestak said, “We must convene the world for two primary objectives: Putting a brake on climate change and putting an end to an illiberal world order’s injustices.”
  • Warren published a post on Medium outlining her plan to ban private prisons and detention facilities.
  • New York Magazine published a profile of Marianne Williamson.
  • Andrew Yang talked about his support for a universal basic income and his opposition to private prisons and cash bail with Al Sharpton on MSNBC.

Republicans

  • Donald Trump said Friday that he called off a military strike on Iran that he had approved Thursday night in response to a U.S. drone having been shot down in Iranian airspace last week. He cited concerns over casualties as the reason for calling off the strike. Saturday, Trump announced he would delay Immigration and Customs Enforcement raids in 10 major cities for two weeks to give Congress more time to develop a solution.
  • Bill Weld spoke at the New Hampshire Free State Project’s Porcfest event and attended Portsmouth PRIDE events in New Hampshire Saturday.

What We’re Reading

Flashback: June 24, 2015

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) announced his candidacy for president, bringing the 2016 Republican primary field to 13 notable candidates.

 



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