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Seth Magaziner (D) defeated Allan Fung (R) and Bill Gilbert (I) in the general election to represent Rhode Island’s 2nd Congressional District

Seth Magaziner (D) defeated Allan Fung (R) and Bill Gilbert (I) in the general election to represent Rhode Island’s 2nd Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives on November 8, 2022. Incumbent Jim Langevin (D) announced on January 18, 2022, that he would not seek reelection after eleven consecutive terms in office, creating an open seat.

According to The Providence Journal, “The unusually competitive race has been a nail-biter for Democrats, who came close to losing a seat that they have held for over 30 years. In the lead-up to the election, national outlets such as the New York TimesWashington Post and Wall Street Journal highlighted Fung’s lead in the polls, suggesting that it was emblematic of the gains that Republicans stood to make in [the] year’s midterm elections…Fung, well known from his 11 years as mayor of Cranston and past campaigns for governor, focused almost exclusively on inflation, especially high energy prices. Magaziner, the two-term state treasurer, argued that electing Fung would help Republicans gain control of Congress. The main point of disagreement between the two candidates boiled down to whether Fung could accurately be called a ‘moderate’ and if he’d vote in lockstep with the rest of his party…”

The outcome of this race affected the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts were up for election.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 56.1% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 42.4%.



A look at upcoming runoff elections (not just Georgia)

Welcome to the Monday, November 21, Brew. 

By: Samuel Wonacott

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Runoff elections happening in at least four states and a territory
  2. Twelve cities approve measures changing local election dates
  3. A preview of next year’s state legislative sessions 

Runoff elections happening in at least four states and a territory

Election Day is over, but not every election held on Nov. 8 had a conclusive outcome. For offices within our coverage scope, we’re tracking runoff elections between the top two vote-getters to determine a winner in four states—Arizona, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas—and the Northern Mariana Islands. 

This is not necessarily a final list, as there could be more runoffs as additional elections are called. We’re monitoring potential runoff elections in Arizona, Georgia, New Jersey, Texas, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Here are the confirmed runoff elections:

  • Arizona: We’re covering runoff in Districts 6 and 8 on March 14, 2023, for city council seats in Phoenix, since no candidate won a majority of the votes in either of those races. 
  • Georgia: The U.S. Senate between incumbent Raphael Warnock (D) and challenger Herschel Walker (R) is scheduled for Dec. 6. Warnock received 49.42% of the vote, and Walker received 48.51% in the Nov. 8 election. Libertarian candidate Chase Oliver received the remaining 2.07%. We covered this runoff election in more detail in the Nov. 10 edition of the Brew. 
  • Louisiana: Technically, Louisiana does not hold runoff elections. The Nov. 8 election was considered a primary, where all candidates competed in the same race. If no candidate received a majority of the primary vote, the top two finishers advanced to a Dec. 10 general election. 
  • In the state government, the Public Service Commission District 3 race and the 1st Circuit Court of Appeal 2nd District race both advanced to the general election. 
  • At the local level, we’re also covering races that advanced to the general election in the 19th Judicial District Court and the Caddo, Calcasieu, East Baton Rouge, and St. Tammany school boards.
  • Texas: We’re covering runoff elections on Dec. 13 for the mayor’s office and city council seats in both Austin and Laredo, as well as separate runoffs on Dec. 17 for city council seats in El Paso.
  • Northern Mariana Islands: The gubernatorial and lieutenant gubernatorial race will conclude with a runoff election on Nov. 25 between incumbent Ralph Torres (R) and challenger Arnold I. Palacios (independent). Palacios, the incumbent lieutenant governor, was elected to that position as a Republican in 2018. Torres received 38.83% of the vote, while Palacios received 33.15% in the Nov. 8 election. Democratic candidate Christina Sablan received the remaining 28.02%. 

Follow along with election results at the link below.
Keep reading

Twelve cities approve measures changing local election dates

Last week, we looked at the 132 statewide ballot measures voters decided on Nov. 8 (we also recorded a webinar, which you can watch here, summarizing ballot measure results and key takeaways). Today, we’re going to look at local measures—specifically, measures on local election administration.  

On Nov. 8, twelve municipalities in four states—California, Colorado, Washington, and Florida—approved measures to move municipal election dates from odd- to even-numbered years and to coincide with statewide elections. San Jose approved a similar measure in June.

One notable measure comes from San Francisco, where voters approved Proposition H. It moves elections for mayor, sheriff, district attorney, city attorney, and treasurer from odd-numbered years to even-numbered years (in November of presidential election years). It also changes signature requirements for ballot initiatives from 5% of votes cast for mayor in the previous general election to 2% of registered voters.

In 2019, 177,192 votes were cast in the mayoral election, meaning the signature requirement set on the basis of votes cast was 8,860. Under Proposition H, the requirement is set at 2% of registered voters. Currently, that figure would come to 9,951, according to the latest data. 

Elections held in even-numbered years tend to see higher voter turnout. Basing the signature requirement on registered voters, rather than votes cast in the preceding mayoral election, was seen as a way to prevent a large increase in signature requirements as a result of changing the mayoral election date. 

Other localities in California approved measures moving election dates to even-numbered years, including Arcadia, Compton, Long Beach, Modesto, Pomona, Redwood City, and San Francisco. Similar measures were also approved in Boulder, Colorado; King County, Washington; and St. Petersburg, Florida. 

This year, we covered local ballot measures within the 100 largest cities in the U.S., within state capitals, and throughout California. We also covered a selection of policing-related ballot measures and election-related ballot measures outside of the largest cities.

Click below to learn more about this year’s local ballot measures. 

Keep reading 

A preview of next year’s state legislative sessions 

The beginning of the year following a midterm election always brings with it a flurry of activity in state politics as newly-elected officeholders are sworn in and legislatures get down to brass tacks.  

With that in mind, let’s take a look at when state legislatures will begin their 2023 legislative sessions (with the caveat that these dates could change before and during the sessions). Sessions lengths vary from state-to-state. 

Here’s a roundup of facts about upcoming state legislative sessions.                

  • All 50 states will hold regular sessions in 2023. 
  • Two states, California and Maine, will convene their 2023 sessions in December 2022. California goes first, starting Dec. 5, 2022.
  • 43 state legislatures will convene in January.
  • Two state legislatures—Nevada and Oklahoma—will convene in February. 
  • Alabama and Florida legislatures will convene in March, and Louisiana’s will convene in April.
  • Virginia is currently scheduled to have the shortest session, starting on Jan. 11, 2023, and ending on Feb. 11, 2023. 
  • Ohio is currently scheduled to have the longest session, starting on Jan. 2, 2023, and ending on Dec. 31, 2023. 

At this point in the year, most states are out of session. But four state legislatures are in regular session—Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Lawmakers in Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania are considered full-time legislators, while New Jersey is considered hybrid, where legislators spend more than two-thirds of a full-time job fulfilling their duties.

Pennsylvania’s legislative session is scheduled to end Nov. 30. Ohio’s session is scheduled to end on Dec. 21. In Michigan and New Jersey, sessions are scheduled to end on Dec. 31. 

Since January, lawmakers in all but four states have held regular sessions. That’s because 46 state legislatures hold regular sessions annually. In Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, and Texas, however, lawmakers hold regular sessions in odd-numbered years only. 

Additionally, state legislatures sometimes meet for special or extraordinary sessions. This year, 17 states have held special sessions—Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. California is scheduled to hold a special session beginning Dec. 5.

You can follow along with 2023 legislative sessions at the link below. 

Keep reading



Michigan Democratic candidates have spent $18.7 million more than Republicans

In Michigan, state-level candidates have spent $157.4 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 23, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $84.6 million and Republican candidates have spent $65.9 million. 

Michigan Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/23/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/23/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 307 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Michigan Bureau of Elections. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Gretchen Whitmer$48,011,305.14
2.Jocelyn Benson$6,154,826.08
3.Dana Nessel$5,053,215.01
4.Darrin Camilleri$1,223,308.21
5.Sam Singh$922,908.04
6.Kevin Hertel$896,987.73
7.Padma Kuppa$838,831.88
8.Kristen Rivet$835,095.06
9.David LaGrand$818,854.52
10.Veronica Klinefelt$797,216.52

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/23/2022)

During the same time period, 325 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Michigan Bureau of Elections. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported contributions for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Perry Johnson$14,070,179.32
2.Kevin Rinke$10,487,714.12
3.Tudor Dixon$3,839,923.40
4.James Craig$3,535,425.97
5.Garrett Soldano$3,041,362.75
6.Jason Wentworth$1,978,004.94
7.Matt Hall$1,460,753.25
8.Aric Nesbitt$1,363,959.97
9.Kristina Karamo$992,430.73
10.Matthew DePerno$948,509.48

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Florida candidate PACs submitted to the Michigan Bureau of Elections. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

StateReport NameDue Date
MI2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
MI2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
MI2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
MI2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
MI2022 Pre-General10/28/2022
MI2022 Post-General12/8/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Indiana Republican candidates have spent $15.5 million more than Democrats

In Indiana, state-level candidates have spent $25.9 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 24, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $4.7 million and Republican candidates have spent $20.2 million. 

Indiana Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/24/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/24/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 151 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Indiana Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Destiny Scott Wells$485,075.18
2.Woodrow Myers$404,907.01
3.Philip Kelly GiaQuinta$295,538.03
4.James David Ford$271,591.04
5.Ted Connor$199,950.98
6.Mitchell Gore$152,970.39
7.Terri Austin$137,185.68
8.Heidi Beidinger$130,100.23
9.Fady Qaddoura$125,893.02
10.Kristin Jones$120,295.05

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/24/2022)

During the same time period, 223 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Indiana Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Eric Holcomb$1,593,815.63
2.Todd Huston$1,104,480.47
3.Kyle Walker$1,079,613.94
4.Diego Morales$904,681.88
5.Julie McGuire$647,738.76
6.Todd Rokita$547,927.37
7.Holli Sullivan$535,074.16
8.Mark Messmer$476,990.12
9.Craig Snow$471,172.76
10.Tera Klutz$460,841.91

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana candidate PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

StateReport NameDue Date
IN2022 Jan Semiannual1/19/2022
IN2022 Statewide Quarterly/Semiannual7/15/2022
IN2022 Pre-Election10/17/2022
IN2022 Statewide Quarterly11/1/2022
IN2022 Annual Report1/18/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



ICYMI: Top stories of the week

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2.6% of state legislative incumbents lost on Nov. 8, with 343 races uncalled

Based on preliminary results, at least 121 state legislative incumbents—73 Democrats, 45 Republicans, and three independent or minor party officeholders—have lost. That amounts to 2.6% of incumbents running for re-election.

This figure is expected to increase. There are currently 343 races featuring incumbents that remain uncalled.

Read more

Where things stand in America’s Pivot Counties

Pivot Counties are the 206 counties that voted for Barack Obama (D) in 2008 and 2012 before voting for Donald Trump (R) in 2016. This year, 98 U.S. House districts overlapped with at least one Pivot County. As of Nov. 14, Republicans won 60 of those districts and Democrats won 35. Among the three uncalled races, Republicans lead in two.

Read more

Five states elected a U.S. Senator and governor from a different party (so far)

Twenty-six states held elections for governor and U.S. Senate on Nov. 8. As of this writing, we have results for 24 of them. The race in Alaska is, as of this writing, uncalled. The U.S. Senate race in Georgia is headed for a Dec. 6 runoff and isn’t included in this analysis. 

Five of those 24 states elected a U.S. Senator and governor from a different party:

  • Kansas: Incumbent Gov. Laura Kelly (D) and incumbent U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran (R) won re-election. 
  • Wisconsin: Incumbent Gov. Tony Evers (D) and incumbent U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson (R) won re-election. 
  • New Hampshire: Incumbent Gov. Chris Sununu (R) and incumbent U.S. Sen. Maggie Hassan (D) won re-election. 
  • Vermont: Incumbent Gov. Phil Scott (R) and U.S. Senate candidate Peter Welch (D) won their elections. 
  • Nevada: Incumbent U.S. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D) and gubernatorial candidate Joe Lombardo (R) won their elections.

Read more

A combined 2,998 candidates ran for president in 2016 and 2020

On Nov. 15, former President Donald Trump (R) announced he would run for a second term—and filed the paperwork to make it official.

Anyone can file to run for president with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC). In 2016 and 2020, a combined 2,998 individuals filed to run for president with the FEC. In 2016, 1,786 candidates filed with the FEC, while in 2020, that figure was 1,212. 

Of the candidates who filed in 2016:

  • 228 filed as Democratic candidates
  • 288 filed as Republican candidates
  • 56 filed as Libertarian candidates
  • 14 filed as Green candidates.

Of the candidates who filed in 2020:

  • 323 filed as Democratic candidates
  • 164 filed as Republican candidates
  • 65 filed as Libertarian candidates
  • 23 filed as Green candidates

Read more

Tracking school board conflicts by the numbers

Since 2021, we’ve tracked school board elections where topics regarding race in education, coronavirus responses, or sex and gender in schools come into play. 561 school districts across 26 states held elections on Nov. 8 featuring at least one of the three conflict topics with 1,800 seats up for election.

As part of our research, we label each winner as either supporting or opposing the three conflict topics. If we cannot determine a stance, we mark the winner unclear. Click the link below to see the results from our work so far.


Read more



California Democratic candidates have spent $145.4 million more than Republicans

In California, state-level candidates have spent $378.9 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 22, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $233.5 million and Republican candidates have spent $118.1 million. 

California Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 268 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the California Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Gavin Newsom$25,580,140.56
2.Rob Bonta$13,241,193.89
3.Yvonne Yiu$10,281,809.86
4.Steven Glazer$6,240,610.77
5.Melissa Hurtado$5,695,190.24
6.Ken Cooley$5,249,316.37
7.Marc Levine$4,694,065.47
8.Malia Cohen$4,648,471.16
9.Catherine Blakespear$4,624,061.66
10.Jim Cooper$4,052,752.27

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (10/22/2021 – 10/22/2022)

During the same time period, 151 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the California Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Larry Elder$21,142,425.63
2.John Cox$19,321,627.53
3.Nathan Hochman$5,465,864.73
4.Lanhee Chen$5,361,527.45
5.Kevin Faulconer$3,620,461.30
6.Brian Dahle$3,284,659.73
7.James Gallagher$3,190,828.70
8.Matt Gunderson$3,104,577.13
9.Frank Bigelow$2,527,392.58
10.Kevin Kiley$2,291,886.29 

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active California candidate PACs submitted to the California Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameDue Date
Semiannual1/31/2022
1st Pre-Election – Primary4/28/2022
2nd Pre-Election – Primary5/26/2022
Semiannual8/1/2022
1st Pre-Election – General9/29/2022
2nd Pre- Election – General10/27/2022
Semiannual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Arizona Republican candidates have spent $40 million more than Democrats

In Arizona, state-level candidates have spent $100 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 22, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $29.8 million and Republican candidates have spent $69.8 million. 

Arizona Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 150 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Arizona Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Katie Hobbs$12,534,035.99
2.Adrian Fontes$2,739,995.40
3.Kris Mayes$2,508,874.29
4.Marco Lopez$1,897,852.17
5.Aaron Lieberman$1,614,102.43
6.Reginald Bolding$576,913.73
7.Christine Marsh$374,208.09
8.Lauren Kuby$322,935.86
9.Sandra D Kennedy$299,568.06
10.Morgan Abraham$298,862.90

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

During the same time period, 176 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the California Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Karrin Taylor Robson$23,533,059.95
2.Kari Lake$8,637,260.82
3.Steve Gaynor$5,102,284.34
4.Rodney Glassman$4,391,347.95
5.Wendy Rogers$3,193,298.61
6.Abraham Hamadeh$2,966,091.53
7.Mark Finchem$2,010,661.60
8.Dawn Grove$1,911,687.27
9.Matt Salmon$1,776,371.05
10.Andrew W. Gould$1,574,667.43

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona candidate PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

StateReport NameDue Date
AZ20211/15/2022
AZ2022 Q14/15/2022
AZ2022 Q27/15/2022
AZ2022 Pre-Primary7/23/2022
AZ2022 Post-Primary and Q310/15/2022
AZ2022 Pre-General10/29/2022
AZ2022 Post-General and Q41/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



North Carolina Republican candidates have spent $8.7 million more than Democrats

In North Carolina, state-level candidates have spent $61 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 22, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $17.3 million and Republican candidates have spent $26 million. 

North Carolina Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 291 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the North Carolina State Board of Elections. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Mary Wills Bode$1,641,514.18
2.Sydney Batch$1,321,940.51
3.Josh Stein$1,107,601.23
4.Roy Cooper$874,738.37
5.Terence Everitt$674,626.43
6.Jay Chaudhuri$621,928.03
7.Sam Ervin$432,428.95
8.Al Platt$361,871.89
9.Brian Farkas$344,426.97
10.Kirk DeViere$291,988.83

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

During the same time period, 296 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the North Carolina State Board of Elections. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Mark Robinson$1,457,362.69
2.Michael Lee$1,180,425.85
3.Jim Perry$1,148,893.14
4.Brent Jackson$949,987.13
5.Tom McInnis$900,010.93
6.Trey Allen$769,518.09
7.Donnie Harrison$689,674.62
8.Timothy K Moore$643,169.55
9.Tim Reeder$599,747.78
10.John Bell$586,609.68

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina candidate PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

StateReport NameDue Date
North Carolina2022 Semiannual1/28/2022
North Carolina2022 Q1 Plus2/28/2022
North Carolina2022 Semiannual (only candidates not on 2022 ballot)7/29/2022
North Carolina2022 Q3 Plus10/31/2022
North Carolina2022 Q41/11/2023
North Carolina2022 Year End Semiannual (only candidates not on 2022 ballot)1/27/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Minnesota Democratic candidates have spent $5.4 million more than Republicans

In Minnesota, state-level candidates have spent $40.4 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 24, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $22.4 million and Republican candidates have spent $17 million. 

Minnesota Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/24/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/24/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 410 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Minnesota Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Tim Walz$9,905,440.30
2.Keith Ellison$1,763,302.73
3.Steve Simon$1,170,345.02
4.Julie Blaha$272,429.52
5.Kelly Morrison$251,883.72
6.Aleta Borrud$201,379.69
7.Erin Murphy$199,787.28
8.Lauren Bresnahan$169,622.81
9.Jamie Long$157,810.02
10.Bonnie S Westlin$153,378.20

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/24/2022)

During the same time period, 368 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Minnesota Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Scott Jensen$5,319,258.22
2.James Schultz$1,078,267.58
3.Kendall Qualls$646,219.29
4.Doug Wardlow$524,555.52
5.Ryan Wilson$441,969.13
6.Paul Gazelka$386,649.20
7.Dennis J Smith$376,890.12
8.Michelle R Benson$370,795.80
9.Kathleen Fowke$311,614.13
10.Kim Crockett$286,378.95

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota candidate PACs submitted to the Minnesota Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

StateReport NameDue Date
MN2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
MN2022 Q14/14/2022
MN2022 Q26/14/2022
MN2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
MN2022 Q39/27/2022
MN2022 Q410/31/2022
MN2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Election Legislation Weekly Digest: November 18, 2022

Here is our weekly round-up on election-related legislation. In it, you’ll find the following information: 

  • Recent activity: Here, we report on the number of bills acted on within the past week. 
  • The big picture: Here, we look at the bills in the aggregate. 
    • Legislative status: How many bills have been introduced, voted upon, or enacted into law?
    • Concentration of activity: What states have seen the highest concentration of legislative activity?
    • Partisan affiliation of sponsorship: How many bills have been sponsored by Democrats vs. Republicans? 
    • Subject: What subjects are most commonly addressed in the bills? 

We will not be sending out a Nov. 25 edition due to the Thanksgiving holiday, but we will resume our weekly coverage of election-related legislation on Dec. 2.

Recent activity

Since November 11, four bills have been acted on in some way (representing a 100 percent increase as compared to last week’s total of 2 bills). These four bills represent 0.2 percent of the 2,530 bills we are tracking. Two of these bills are from states with a divided government, and two are from states with Democratic trifectas.

The bar chart below compares recent activity on a week-to-week basis over the last eight weeks. 

  • 4 bills were introduced (or saw pre-committee action).
    • Divided governments: 2
    • Democratic trifectas: 2

The map below visualizes the concentration of this recent activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been acted upon in the last week. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of bills that have been acted upon in the last week. 

The big picture

To date, we have tracked 2,530 election-related bills. This represents a marginal increase as compared to last week’s total. These bills were either introduced this year or crossed over from last year’s legislative sessions.

 

Legislative status 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of the bills we are tracking. The following status indicators are used: 

  • Introduced: The bill has been pre-filed, introduced, or referred to committee but has not otherwise been acted upon.
  • Advanced from committee: The bill has received a favorable vote in committee. It has either advanced to another committee or to the floor for a vote. 
  • Passed one chamber: The bill has been approved by one legislative chamber.
  • Conference committee: Differing versions of the bill have been approved by their respective chambers and a conference committee has been appointed to reconcile the differences. 
  • Passed both chambers: The bill has cleared both chambers of the legislature. 
  • Enacted: The bill has been enacted into law, by gubernatorial action or inaction or veto override. 
  • Vetoed: The bill has been vetoed. 
  • Dead: The bill has been defeated in committee or by floor vote. 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of bills in Democratic and Republican trifectas, respectively. 

Concentration of activity

The map below visualizes the concentration of legislative activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been introduced. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of relevant bills. 

Partisan affiliation of sponsor(s)

The pie chart below visualizes the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors.

The bar chart below visualizes the correlation between the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors and trifecta status (e.g., how many Democratic-sponsored bills were introduced in Democratic trifectas vs. Republican trifectas).

Bills by topic

The chart below presents information on the total number of bills dealing with particular topics. The number listed on the blue portion of each bar indicates the number of Democratic-sponsored bills dealing with the subject in question. The number listed on the red portion of the bar indicates the number of Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions of the bar indicate the number of bipartisan-sponsored bills and bills with unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Note that the numbers listed here will not, when summed, equal the total number of bills because some bills deal with multiple topics.