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33% of Washington state legislative incumbents face contested top-two primaries

Thirty-one of the 95 Washington state legislators who filed for re-election—22 Democrats and nine Republicans—will face contested primaries on Aug. 2. This represents 33% of incumbents who filed for re-election, lower than in 2020 but a higher rate than other recent election cycles.

Washington is one of three states holding top-two state legislative primaries this year. Under this system, all candidates appear on the same primary ballot regardless of their party affiliation and the top-two vote-getters advance to the general election.

Under this system, a primary is contested when more than two candidates file to run in the same district, at which point at least one candidate is guaranteed to lose.

Historically, however, incumbents tend to advance to the general election in Washington.

Between 2014 and 2020, 127 incumbents faced contested primaries in the state, four of whom—two Democrats and two Republicans—lost. This gives incumbents a primary win rate of 98%.

Twenty-seven incumbents are not seeking re-election this year, an increase compared to previous election cycles. This represents 18% of all seats in the Washington State Legislature.

Washington does not have term limits, meaning each of these incumbents either chose to retire or seek some other office.

Overall, 292 candidates filed to run in Washington’s top-two state legislative primaries this year: 126 Democrats, 142 Republicans, and 24 independent or minor party candidates.

All 98 House seats are up for election along with 24 of the state’s 49 Senate seats.

Washington has had a Democratic trifecta since 2017 when the party won control of the Senate in a special election. Democrats currently hold a 57-41 majority in the House and a 29-20 majority in the Senate.

Washington’s state legislative primaries are scheduled for Aug. 2, the 10th statewide primary date of the 2022 state legislative election cycle.

Additional reading:

Washington House of Representatives elections, 2022

Washington State Senate elections, 2022



Incumbent Galvin faces Sullivan in Massachusetts’ secretary of state Democratic primary on Sept. 6

Incumbent William Galvin and Tanisha Sullivan are running in the Democratic primary for Massachusetts secretary of state on September 6, 2022. 

Galvin won his first term in 1994 and was re-elected six times before the 2022 election. In this period, he faced Democratic primary opposition twice. In the 2018 primary, he defeated Josh Zakim, 67% to 33%. 

According to Matt Stout of the Boston Globe, Galvin is “the only incumbent Democratic secretary of state being targeted within his own party.”

Galvin said his experience was important given the increased focus on elections, saying to the Boston Globe, “This is a critical time for democracy. That’s why I think I can provide a unique service. Probably the biggest shift is the national climate, the importance of elections. I believe I can continue to do it effectively. I don’t believe anyone else can [do it as well] at this point.”

Sullivan’s professional experience includes serving as the Chief Equity Office for Boston Public Schools, president of the Boston Branch of the NAACP, a corporate counsel for Sanofi Genzyme, and a fellow for CEO Action for Racial Equity. She said she would do more to promote voting among minority communities, saying at the state party convention, “Despite record voter turnout in 2020, hear me on this, voters from some of our most vulnerable communities still saw the lowest voter turnout across Massachusetts, leaving behind far too many voices…Simply put, Massachusetts needs a secretary of state who fights on the ground with us every day, fighting for the democracy we deserve.”

Sullivan received the Democratic Party’s official endorsement with the support of 62.4% of delegates at the state convention in June 2022. According to Colin A. Young of the State House News Service, Sullivan “was supported by more than 2,500 delegates while Galvin was backed by about 1,500 delegates.”

Young also wrote that “Galvin has lost at the party convention but then prevailed in the party primary three times previously: in 1990 when he ran for treasurer; in 1994 when he first ran for secretary of state; and in 2018 when the upstart campaign of Josh Zakim won the party’s endorsement before being crushed by Galvin when the contest extended beyond the most hardcore party insiders.”

Sullivan said she thought the state party convention endorsement was very important: “2020, in many respects, was a turning point for folks across the country and our understanding about just how important the office of secretary of state is. More people understand the critical role that this office has to play. And I believe that that’s going to make a difference. People are paying attention.”

Galvin said he wanted the support of party delegates at the convention but didn’t think it would decide the primary’s outcome, saying, “I’ve actually not been the endorsee of the convention on three different occasions and I’ve won by more every single time. So I guess I have a mixed opinion. I think the difference between now and four years ago is I think, more than ever before, people recognize the importance of secretary of state, not just here but everywhere in the country.”

Prior to the 2022 elections, the last Republican to serve as secretary of state in Massachusetts was Frederick Cook, who left office in 1949.

Additional reading:

Massachusetts Secretary of State

William Galvin (Secretary of the Commonwealth)

Tanisha Sullivan



Hawaii lifts last statewide school mask requirement in the nation

On August 1, 2022, Hawaii lifted its statewide school mask requirement, making it the final state in the nation to do so. The Hawaii Department of Health announced the change on July 12.

Thirty-five states required masks in schools at some point since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Some requirements specifically covered schools, while others were by-products of a general statewide mask requirement. 

Maryland and Washington were the first states to issue school reopening guidance requiring masks in schools, both on June 10, 2020. Both requirements ended in March 2022.

Hawaii’s school mask requirement was the longest in the nation, lasting from July 15, 2020, to August 1, 2022. North Dakota had the shortest statewide school mask requirement. It lasted from November 14, 2020, to January 18, 2021.

Nine states have banned school mask requirements, five of which had previously required masks in schools. Arkansas’ ban was the first to take effect on April 28, 2021. The ban was later suspended by court action on Sept. 30, 2021. 

The most recent ban took effect in Iowa on May 16, 2022. The state had initially instituted the policy on May 20, 2021, but parts of the ban were temporarily suspended by court action after its passage.

Additional reading:

School responses to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic during the 2020-2021 academic year

State-level mask requirements in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, 2020-2022



Election officials in Kansas expect higher voter turnout at Aug. 2 primary due to abortion amendment

On August 2, Kansans will vote on political parties’ nominees for federal and state offices, as well as an amendment to provide that the state constitution cannot be interpreted to create or secure a right to abortion. 

The ballot measure could increase turnout above that for previous midterm primaries in recent years according to Fred Sherman, election commissioner for Johnson County. Sherman said, “We are anticipating an unprecedented or record-breaking voter participation rate for our August primary.” In Sedgwick County, election commissioner Angela Caudillo said, “Typically, elections like this run about 20-30% turnout. We’re expecting potentially 50% turn out.” KCTV 5 reported that officials in Wyandotte County were expecting 40%-45% turnout.

On July 29, the office of Secretary of State Scott Schwab projected that turnout would be around 636,032 or 36% of registered voters. Schwab said, “… abortion is a compelling issue, and there’s strong opinions on both sides. That’s always going to be an issue that some people go and vote for.”

Since 2010, the average non-presidential primary turnout has been 25.6%, with a range of 20.2% in 2014 to 34.2% in 2020. The highest turnout at a midterm primary election during this period was 27.1% in 2018. 

Kansas uses a semi-closed primary for congressional and state-level elections. Voters already affiliated with a political party can participate only in that party’s primary. An unaffiliated voter can declare his or her affiliation with a political party on the day of the election and vote in that party’s primary. However, an unaffiliated voter does not need to declare an affiliation to vote on the constitutional amendment.

In the legislature, sponsors proposed the constitutional amendment as a response to the Kansas Supreme Court’s ruling in Hodes & Nauser v. Schmidt (2019), which held that the Kansas Bill of Rights “affords protection of the right of personal autonomy,” including “decisions that can include whether to continue a pregnancy.”

Kansas is the seventh state where voters will decide on an amendment to provide that the state’s constitution cannot be interpreted to establish a state constitutional right to abortion. In 1986, Massachusetts was the first state where voters decided, and rejected, this type of constitutional amendment. In Florida, voters rejected an amendment in 2012. Since 2014, voters decided, and approved, similar amendments in four states – Alabama, Louisiana, Tennessee, and West Virginia. In November, Kentucky will be the eighth state to vote on this type of constitutional amendment. 



$359,986 was spent with USPS from Wisconsin campaign accounts

In Wisconsin, state-level candidates and political organizations have spent $359,986 from their campaign accounts on services from the United States Postal Service in the 2022 election cycle so far. USPS received 0.43 percent of all 84.6 million in reported expenditures

According to Wisconsin Ethics Committee reports, here are the top candidates and groups that have spent campaign funds with USPS between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 30, 2022.

Top 10 Wisconsin candidates and political organizations spending money with USPS

Of the $359,986 spent with USPS, 56.2 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with USPS (1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022)

RankTotal Paid to USPSNameAccount Type
1.$125,311.19Americans for Prosperity*Non-Candidate Committee or Group
2.$17,247.90Tony EversCandidate Committee
3.$12,350.13Josh KaulCandidate Committee
4.$12,264.00Kevin PetersenCandidate Committee
5.$9,781.00Committee to Elect a Republican SenateNon-Candidate Committee or Group
6.$6,924.08Louis J Molepske JrCandidate Committee
7.$6,742.00Rep Assembly Campaign Com RaccNon-Candidate Committee or Group
8.$6,697.70Scott CorbettCandidate Committee
9.$4,833.00Steve DoyleCandidate Committee
10.$4,327.12Roger RothCandidate Committee
*Americans for Prosperity, a 501(c)(4) advocacy group, is classified as an “unregistered express advocacy” group by the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. This group appears twice on this list in the Transparency USA database because these expenditures have unique identifiers in the state’s dataset. They are included as a single entity for this article.

Campaign expenditures with USPS in eight states

Here is how spending with USPS in Wisconsin compares to other states with the most recent report data available from Transparency USA for the 2021-2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total spent with USPS, by state

RankStateExpenditures with USPSTotal Reported Expenditures% of Total ExpendituresAvailable Reporting Period
1California$15,081,328$1,226,617,6541.23%1/1/2021 – 5/21/2022
2Pennsylvania$2,783,385$520,342,0530.53%1/1/2021 – 6/16/2022
3Texas$2,296,493$558,195,683.200.41%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
4Michigan$516,804$164,128,118.560.31%1/1/2021 – 7/20/2022
5Wisconsin$359,986$84,579,752.310.43%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
6North Carolina$275,000$57,297,691.780.48%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
7Indiana$118,005$34,302,447.740.34%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
8Ohio$58,235$71,355,093.800.08%1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Committee. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Name of ReportReporting PeriodDeadline
2022 Jan Semiannual7/1/21 – 12/31/211/18/2022
Spring Pre-Primary1/1/22 – 1/31/222/7/2022
Spring Pre-Election2/1/22 – 3/21/223/28/2022
July Semiannual3/22/22 – 6/30/227/15/2022
Fall Pre-Primary7/1/22 – 7/25/228/1/2022
Sept Data7/26/22 – 8/31/229/27/2022
Fall Pre-General9/1/22 – 10/24/2210/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual7/1/22 – 12/31/221/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



$2.3 million spent with USPS from Texas campaign accounts

In Texas, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $2.3 million from their campaign accounts on services from the United States Postal Service in the 2022 election cycle so far. USPS received 0.4 percent of all $558.2 million in reported expenditures

According to Texas Ethics Commission reports, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with USPS between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 30, 2022.

Top 10 Texas candidates and PACs spending money with USPS

Of the $2.3 million spent with USPS, 78.7 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with USPS (1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022)

RankTotal Paid to USPSNameAccount Type
1.$907,506.07Eva GuzmanCandidate Committee
2.$209,313.46Greg AbbottCandidate Committee
3.$163,821.68Phil KingCandidate Committee
4.$144,251.70Texans for Lawsuit Reform PACNon-Candidate Committee
5.$135,999.64Greg TravisCandidate Committee
6.$88,361.53Dallas/Fort Worth Conservative VotersNon-Candidate Committee
7.$57,091.30Brian HarrisonCandidate Committee
8.$39,105.50Kade WilcoxCandidate Committee
9.$32,472.42Justin L BerryCandidate Committee
10.$29,944.63Texas Federation of Republican Women PACNon-Candidate Committee

Campaign expenditures with USPS in either states

Here is how spending with USPS in Texas compares to other states with the most recent report data available from Transparency USA for the 2021-2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total spent with USPS, by state

RankStateExpenditures with USPSTotal Reported Expenditures% of Total Reported ExpendituresAvailable Reporting Period
1California$15,081,328$1,226,617,6541.23%1/1/2021 – 5/21/2022
2Pennsylvania$2,783,385$520,342,0530.53%1/1/2021 – 6/16/2022
3Texas$2,296,493$558,195,683.200.41%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
4Michigan$516,804$164,128,118.560.31%1/1/2021 – 7/20/2022
5Wisconsin$359,986$84,579,752.310.43%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
6North Carolina$275,000$57,297,691.780.48%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
7Indiana$118,005$34,302,447.740.34%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
8Ohio$58,235$71,355,093.800.08%1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Name of ReportReporting PeriodDeadline
2022 Jan Semiannual7/1/21 – 12/31/211/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary 30 days1/1/22 – 1/20/221/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary 8 days1/21/22 – 2/19/222/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff2/20/22 – 5/14/225/16/2022
2022 July Semiannual1/1/22 – 6/30/227/15/2022
2022 Pre-General 30 days7/1/22 – 9/29/2210/11/2022
2022 Pre-General 8 days9/30/22 – 10/29/2210/31/2022
2022 Jan Semiannual7/1/22 – 12/31/221/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Signature deadline for Colorado initiatives approaching on August 8

Eleven ballot initiatives cleared for signature gathering in Colorado face a signature deadline on August 8. To qualify for a spot on the November ballot, proponents need to submit 124,632 valid signatures.

The 11 initiatives concern topics including abortion, alcohol regulations, decriminalizing psychedelic plants and fungi, housing, utilities, healthcare, campaign finance, and education funding.

Initiative 56, sponsored by Colorado Life Initiative, would prohibit abortion in the state. Specifically, it would prohibit “intentionally causing the death of a living human being at any time prior to, during, or after birth while the child is under the age of 18 years by using or prescribing any instrument, medicine, drug, or any other substance, device, or means, and causing death.”

In 2022, there will be at least five ballot measures addressing abortion — the most on record for a single year. Measures have been certified for the ballot in California, Kansas, Kentucky, Montana, and Vermont.

Initiatives 121 and 122 were sponsored by Wine in Grocery Stores, which raised $999,532 through June 27, 2022. Initiative 121 would create a new fermented malt beverage and wine retailer license to allow grocery stores, convenience stores, and other businesses that are licensed to sell beer to also sell wine and conduct wine tastings. Initiative 122 would allow retail establishments licensed to sell alcohol for off-site consumption to offer a delivery service or provide for a third-party alcohol delivery service.

Two other initiatives concerning alcohol were also cleared to circulate. Initiative 96 would incrementally increase the number of retail liquor store licenses an individual may own or hold a share in and Initiative 135 would require public hearings and mandate minimum distance requirements from schools and churches for new or expanded alcohol retail establishments.

Coloradans will vote on an initiative in November to decriminalize possession of certain psychedelic plants and fungi. The initiative would define dimethyltryptamine (DMT), ibogaine, mescaline (excluding peyote), psilocybin, and psilocyn as natural medicines. It would also create the Regulated Natural Medicine Access Program for licensed centers to administer natural medicine services.

Sponsors have been collecting signatures for a competing measure, Initiative 61, which would decriminalize possession of certain psychedelic plants and fungi, but it would not provide for a regulated access program. Sponsors of the measure argue the regulated access program proposed under the other initiative would allow companies to profit off of psychedelics. Organizer Melanie Rose Rodgers said, “Decriminalization isn’t a popular thing for companies and corporations and venture capital. Decriminalization is for the people.”

An initiative to reduce the state income tax rate from 4.55% to 4.40% sponsored by Jon Caldara of the Independence Institute and Republican State Senator Jerry Sonnenberg is also on the ballot. In addition to the two citizen initiatives, five legislative referrals have been certified to appear on the November ballot.

From 1985 through 2020, an average of nine measures appeared on the statewide ballot during even-numbered years in Colorado. The approval rate for measures on the ballot in even-numbered years was 47.34%.



Upcoming minimum wage ballot measures

Welcome to the Monday, August 1, Brew. 

By: Samuel Wonacott

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. An update on minimum wage ballot measures
  2. A look at Washington’s Aug. 2 primaries 
  3. Four candidates running in Democratic gubernatorial primary in Florida

An update on minimum wage ballot measures

Welcome to August! We hope you had a great final July weekend.

Late last week, the One Fair Wage campaign in Michigan announced that it submitted more than 610,000 signatures to qualify a $15 minimum wage initiative for the ballot in 2024. This is one of several minimum wage measures that could or will appear on the ballot this year or in the future in states across the country. 

Here’s an overview of upcoming minimum wage ballot measures:

  • There is one minimum wage measure certified for the ballot this year—the Nevada Minimum Wage Amendment. If approved, the amendment will increase the minimum wage in the state to $12 per hour by July 1, 2024.
  • A second minimum wage measure could appear on the ballot this year in Nebraska. Signatures are currently being verified for that citizen-initiated measure. The initiative would increase the minimum wage to $15 by January 1, 2026.
  • In California, the California $18 Minimum Wage Initiative will be on the ballot in 2024. 

The Michigan $15 Minimum Wage Initiative is an indirect initiative, meaning that, if enough signatures are verified, it goes to the state legislature first for consideration before being placed on the ballot. If the legislature approves the measure, it is enacted into law, but if the legislature does not approve of the measure, it goes to the ballot for voters to decide. If approved by the legislature or voters, the initiative would increase the state minimum wage incrementally by a dollar every year, over the course of five years, until it reaches $15.

The signature submission follows a recent ruling by a Michigan judge regarding two 2018 citizen-initiated laws, including one that would raise the minimum wage to $12 incrementally by 2022. Rather than having the measures go to the ballot, the state legislature voted to approve them, but later amended the minimum wage measure to increase the wage to $12 by 2030, changing the timeline for the wage increase. 

The amended version was signed into law by then-Gov. Rick Snyder (R). Michigan One Fair Wage and Michigan Time to Care — the campaigns behind the two initiatives — sued the state of Michigan. The Michigan Court of Claims struck down these two amended initiatives, ruling that the adopt-and-amend tactic was unconstitutional.

From 1996 to 2021, there were 27 minimum wage increase measures on the ballot. Of the 27 measures, 25 were approved and 2 were defeated

The last time voters rejected a minimum wage increase at the ballot was in 1996 in Missouri and Montana. The last vote on a minimum wage measure was in Florida in 2020, when 60.82% of voters approved Amendment 2, a $15 minimum wage initiative. 

The average state minimum wage in 2022 is about $9.85, up from $9.59 in 2021. The three highest statewide minimum wages are:

  • $15.00 in California,
  • $14.49 in Washington, and
  • $14.25 in Massachusetts.

Twenty states use the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour for most employees.

Click below to read more about minimum wage ballot measures. 

Keep reading

A look at Washington’s Aug. 2 primaries 

Tomorrow, five states will hold primaries. We’ve looked at what will be on the ballot in Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, and Missouri. Let’s round off our summary of Aug. 2 primaries with an exploration of what Washington voters will see on their ballot.

For congressional and state-level elections, Washington uses a top-two primary system in which all candidates appear on the same ballot. The top two vote-getters move on to the general election, regardless of their party affiliation. 

Congressional primaries

Voters in Washington will decide primaries for a U.S. Senate seat and all 10 U.S. House districts. 

In the U.S. Senate race, incumbent Patty Murray (D) is facing off against 17 candidates, including Tiffany Smiley (R). Murray—who was first elected in 1992—and Smiley have raised the most money in the race.

Democrats hold a 7-3 majority in the state’s U.S. House delegation. Sixty-eight candidates filed to run in the 10 U.S. House districts—37 Republicans, 19 Democrats, seven independents and five third-party candidates. That’s 6.8 candidates per district, fewer than the 7.3 candidates in 2020, and more than the 4.9 candidates per district in 2018.

All 10 incumbents filed to run for re-election, meaning there were no open U.S. House seats for the first time in a decade.

State 

Washington is holding a special election for secretary of state. Gov. Jay Inslee appointed the current incumbent, Steve Hobbs (D), on Nov. 10, 2021, to replace Kim Wyman (R). Wyman resigned to become security lead of the federal Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency in President Joe Biden’s (D) administration. Eight candidates are running in the primary, including Hobbs. The primary features two Democrats, three Republicans, an independent, and two minor-party candidates.  

Twenty-four state Senate districts and all 98 state House districts are up for election. Democrats hold a 29-20 majority in the Senate and a 57-41 majority in the House. Two hundred and ninety-two candidates filed to run across both chambers. There are 27 open seats in both chambers, and 42% of primaries are contested. Additionally, 33% of incumbents are running in contested primaries. 

In Washington, the two candidates who receive the most votes in the primary, and who receive at least 1% of the votes, advance to the general election. Washington is one of 40 states without primary election runoffs. The state does not cancel uncontested primaries for partisan offices but does cancel uncontested primaries for nonpartisan offices. Write-in candidates are required to file with the secretary of state or relevant county filing officer.  

Click below to learn more about Washington’s upcoming elections. 

Keep reading 

Four candidates running in Democratic gubernatorial primary in Florida

Charlie Crist, Cadance Daniel, Nikki Fried, and Robert Willis are running in the Democratic primary election for Governor of Florida on Aug. 23. Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) is running for re-election. The Republican primary was canceled, so DeSantis automatically advanced to the general election.  

Crist and Fried have received the most media attention and endorsements.

Crist was elected to the U.S. House in 2016. He served as governor from 2007 to 2011, attorney general from 2003 to 2007, state education commissioner from 2001 to 2003, and in the state senate from 1992 to 1998. Crist was elected to state office as a Republican before becoming an independent in 2010 and a Democrat in 2012. Crist has campaigned on five steps he says would make it easier to vote in the state, including reversing 2021 changes to the state’s mail ballot policies, providing clean water, and easing transitions for out-of-state transplants. Three members of Florida’s U.S. House delegation, 22 members of the state legislature, the Florida Education Association, and the Florida AFL-CIO endorsed Crist.

Fried was elected as agriculture commissioner in 2018. Fried is the only Democrat to hold statewide elected office in Florida. Prior to holding elected office, she worked as a public defender, attorney in private practice, and government affairs advocate for the marijuana industry. Fried has campaigned on reducing housing costs, lowering the price of homeowner’s insurance, a $15 minimum wage, and creating a small business growth fund as key issues. Four members of the state legislature and the Democratic Black Caucus of Florida endorsed Fried.

Crist’s campaign has focused on restoring civility, ending divisive politics, and working across the political aisle. CNN’s Steve Contorno compared his campaign strategy to that of President Joe Biden (D) in 2020. Fried’s campaign has focused on the idea of electing a new face in Florida politics and has cited Crist’s loss in 2014 to then-Gov. Rick Scott (R) and Biden’s three-point 2020 loss in the state as reasons voters should nominate her.

Republicans currently hold both a trifecta and a triplex in the state, meaning they hold majorities in both chambers of the state legislature along with the positions of governor, attorney general, and secretary of state. Florida is one of 20 states to have both a Republican trifecta and a Republican triplex. 

Keep reading



The top fundraisers among Texas statewide elected offices

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers among Texas statewide officeholders and candidates, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for statewide elected offices submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2022, and June 30, 2022.

Statewide political positions are typically offices in the executive and judicial branches of government rather than the legislative, and they most often represent all citizens in the state, rather than those in a particular district.

Top Texas statewide fundraisers by party

The top fundraisers among Texas statewide officeholders and candidates are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable. If no office is indicated, the person was an incumbent and was not on the ballot in 2022.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Beto O’Rourke (Governor) – $31,844,328
  • Jay Kleberg (Land Commissioner) – $1,434,388
  • Mike Collier (Lieutenant Governor) – $1,358,190
  • Rochelle Garza (Attorney General) – $971,981
  • Joe Jaworski (Attorney General) – $593,236

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Greg Abbott (Governor) – $30,018,811
  • Dan Patrick (Lieutenant Governor) – $6,252,091
  • Eva Guzman (Attorney General) – $4,223,448
  • George P. Bush (Attorney General) – $4,189,399
  • Donald Huffines (Governor) – $4,110,817

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $37.2 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $60.6 million. Combined, all statewide officeholders and candidates in the Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022, filing period raised $97.9 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 97 percent of all Democratic statewide officeholder and candidate fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 81 percent of all Republican statewide officeholder and candidate fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top 10 fundraisers during this period.

TOP 10 FUNDRAISERS – Texas STATEWIDE OFFICEHOLDERS AND CANDIDATES (Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022)
Name Party Affiliation Office Sought Raised Spent
Beto O’Rourke Democratic Party Governor $31,844,328 $12,154,146
Governor Greg Abbott Republican Party Governor $30,018,811 $49,608,521
Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick Republican Party Lieutenant Governor $6,252,091 $4,500,420
Eva Guzman Republican Party Attorney General $4,223,448 $3,677,443
Natural Resources Commissioner George P. Bush Republican Party Attorney General $4,189,399 $7,355,794
Donald Huffines Republican Party Governor $4,110,817 $13,126,027
Attorney General Ken Paxton Republican Party Attorney General $3,580,265 $7,626,255
Sarah Stogner Republican Party Railroad Commission $2,000,124
Dawn Buckingham Republican Party Land Commissioner $1,542,046 $3,065,708
Jay Kleberg Democratic Party Land Commissioner $1,434,388 $1,436,124

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days) 2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff 5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days) 10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days) 10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data 1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



The top fundraisers in the Texas House

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Texas House of Representatives, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the House submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2022, and June 30, 2022.

Top fundraisers in the Texas House of Representatives by party

The top fundraisers in Texas House of Representatives elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Jolanda Jones (District 147) – $245,432
  • Ann Johnson (District 134) – $239,229
  • Richard Raymond (District 42) – $233,215
  • Danielle Keys Bess (District 147) – $176,028
  • Venton Jones (District 100) – $174,416

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Dade Phelan (District 21) – $3,600,356
  • Stephanie Klick (District 91) – $1,616,488
  • Glenn Rogers (District 60) – $1,245,624
  • Carl Tepper (District 84) – $1,191,540
  • Kyle Kacal (District 12) – $946,160

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $6.7 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $34.1 million. Combined, all House fundraisers in the Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022, filing period raised $40.8 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 16 percent of all Democratic House fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 25 percent of all Republican House fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top 10 fundraisers during this period.

TOP 10 FUNDRAISERS – TEXAS HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022)
Name Party Affiliation Raised Spent
Dade Phelan Republican Party $3,600,356 $3,670,185
Stephanie Klick Republican Party $1,616,488 $961,019
Glenn Rogers Republican Party $1,245,624 $907,617
Carl Tepper Republican Party $1,191,540 $133,503
Kyle Kacal Republican Party $946,160 $872,885
Ryan Guillen Republican Party $843,817 $978,092
Barron Casteel Republican Party $728,119 $669,260
Terri Leo-Wilson Republican Party $710,044 $255,610
Reggie Smith Republican Party $657,629 $395,370
Laura Hill Republican Party $637,531 $393,851

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days) 2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff 5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days) 10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days) 10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data 1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.