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Trump rallies in Dallas Thursday, O’Rourke holds counter-rally in Grand Prairie

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

October 17, 2019: Donald Trump and Beto O’Rourke hold rallies in Texas Thursday. Tom Steyer spent more than $26 million on TV ads since entering the race. blank    blankblank   


 Presidential poll highlights - Quinnipiac University (October 11-13, 2019)
Presidential poll highlights - Boston Herald/Franklin Pierce University (October 9-13, 2019)

Notable Quote of the Day

“Historically, endorsements have been a good predictor of presidential primary outcomes, often rivaling early polls for how well they anticipate how the vote will eventually turn out. The theory behind the importance of endorsements, as perhaps best articulated in the book ‘The Party Decides,’ has come under attack in recent years, mostly because Donald Trump’s nomination in 2016 despite a lack of support from Republican endorsers was a poor data point for the theory (to put it kindly). In addition, some Democrats who received a number of endorsements earlier this year, such as Amy Klobuchar and Cory Booker, have not yet gained much traction in the polls. Nonetheless, the theory has a fairly good long-term track record. Incidentally, the theory is not necessarily that the endorsements directly influence voters — for instance, that a voter says to herself ‘Senator Such-and-Such is endorsing Governor So-and-So; guess I’m going to vote for So-and-So!.’ (Although, an endorser with as high a profile as Ocasio-Cortez could be an exception.) Rather, it’s that endorsements are a proxy for support from ‘party elites,’ and that party elites’ preferences tend to be a leading indicator of voter preferences.”

– Nate Silver, FiveThirtyEight

Democrats

  • Michael Bennet criticized the cost of the Medicare for All plans proposed by Sanders and Warren. “Democrats need to win back the nine million Obama-Trump voters to take the White House and Senate and keep the House. Nominating a candidate who supports Medicare for All is not a recipe to do that,” Bennet tweeted.

  • Joe Biden discussed the Turkish conflict in Syria and criticized Trump’s foreign policy during a speech in Iowa Wednesday.

  • Cory Booker introduced the Break the Cycle of Violence Act Wednesday, which would spend $90 million over 10 years in urban areas on focused deterrence and other intervention programs.

  • Booker will endorse Marie Newman over incumbent Democratic Rep. Dan Lipinksi Thursday in Chicago.

  • The Steve Bullock campaign organized a telephone news conference with Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller, former Story County Democrats Chairwoman Jan Bauer, and former Rep. Dave Nagle Tuesday on Bullock’s campaign in Iowa.

  • Pete Buttigieg raised more than $1 million in the 24 hours after the debate and passed 600,000 individual donors.

  • Julián Castro is attending a roundtable discussion on racial profiling in Des Moines and a forum in Davenport Friday.

  • Tulsi Gabbard discussed media coverage of her campaign in an interview with Fox News Channel’s Tucker Carlson Wednesday.

  • Amy Klobuchar raised $1.1 million in the 24 hours following the October debate.

  • Beto O’Rourke is holding a counter-rally in Grand Prairie, Texas, while Trump is in Dallas Thursday night.

  • Rep. Ilhan Omar endorsed Bernie Sanders Wednesday.

  • Joe Sestak is on his fifth day of walking across New Hampshire, traveling from Mont Vernon to Manchester.

  • Tom Steyer has spent more than $26 million on television ads since beginning his campaign in July, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis. That is more than six times as many ads as the rest of the Democratic field combined aired. Twenty thousand of Steyer’s 53,000 ads aired in Iowa.

  • Elizabeth Warren will attend a meeting with members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Bold PAC Thursday.

  • Marianne Williamson wrote an op-ed in The Washington Post criticizing the content of the October debate and stating she would not drop out of the race. Williamson also discussed her campaign in an interview on Fox News Channel.

  • Andrew Yang will host an unmoderated Q&A online for 10 hours Friday on Facebook, Instagram, Reddit, and YouTube.

Republicans

Flashback: October 17, 2015

Jeb Bush released a digital ad questioning Donald Trump’s ability to be commander-in-chief. 



Dems spar over healthcare costs and gun policy in fourth debate

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

October 16, 2019: Twelve Democratic presidential candidates debated Tuesday night in Westerville, Ohio. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is expected to formally endorse Bernie Sanders on Saturday. blank    blankblank   


 Presidential Facebook ads, 2019-2020 (October 7-13, 2019)

Notable Quote of the Day

“The knives finally came out for Elizabeth Warren, but she parried them across all three hours of the debate. Warren demonstrated she can handle the pressure that comes with being the front-runner, even if it wasn’t always comfortable or particularly easy. And she did take some hits: from Buttigieg on Medicare for All, Andrew Yang on workforce automation and Klobuchar on, well, nearly everything.”

– Adam Cancryn, Politico

Debate Night

Twelve Democratic presidential candidates debated Tuesday night in Westerville, Ohio: Joe BidenCory BookerPete ButtigiegJulián CastroTulsi GabbardKamala HarrisAmy KlobucharBeto O’RourkeBernie SandersTom SteyerElizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang.

The candidates discussed impeachment, healthcare, tax policy, foreign policy, gun violence, antitrust laws, fitness, abortion, and the Supreme Court. Elizabeth Warren had the most speaking time at 23 minutes. Tom Steyer spoke the least at 7.2 minutes.

For highlights from the debate for each candidate, click here.


Democrats

  • Michael Bennet will campaign in New Hampshire Wednesday, marking his ninth visit to the state.

  • Joe Biden is holding a community event Wednesday in Davenport, Iowa.

  • Julián Castro will attend a community block party Thursday hosted by Urban Dreams, Creative visions, and NAACP Des Moines in Iowa.

  • Steve Bullock said in a statement about the debate, “Six debates in and the Democratic Party is still failing to speak to the challenges middle class families face every day. When 40% of Americans wouldn’t have $400 to spare in the event of an emergency, we need to be talking about serious solutions that will make people’s lives better in the here and now — not a decade down the line, and not after a hypothetical political revolution.”

  • Pete Buttigieg is speaking Wednesday at Iowa State University’s campus in Ames.

  • John Delaney will campaign in an RV across Iowa Wednesday through Friday.

  • Kamala Harris will make her third trip to Iowa this month with stops in Dubuque, Tipton, Davenport, and Clinton Wednesday through Friday.

  • Amy Klobuchar will visit all 10 counties in New Hampshire Wednesday and Thursday as part of her “For All of America” tour.

  • Wayne Messam raised $5 in the third quarter of 2019, according to his FEC filing. His campaign Tuesday said there was a computer glitch but did not provide another fundraising figure.

  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is expected to formally endorse Bernie Sanders on Saturday.

  • Joe Sestak is on his fourth day of walking across New Hampshire. He will make stops in Londonderry, Peterborough, and Mont Vernon.

  • Marianne Williamson held an event Tuesday night in Encinitas, California

Republicans

  • Mark Sanford will campaign in Harrisburg and Pittsburgh Wednesday as part of his “Kids, We’re Bankrupt and We Didn’t Even Know It” Tour.

  • The Donald Trump campaign, authorized joint fundraising committees, and Republican National Committee have a cumulative $158 million in cash on hand after the third quarter of 2019.

  • Joe Walsh raised roughly $130,000 in the third quarter of 2019, not including a $100,000 loan the candidate made to his own campaign.

Flashback: October 16, 2015

Hillary Clinton outraised and outspent all other 2016 presidential candidates in the third quarter of 2015. She raised more than $29 million and spent more than $25 million. 

 



Vaping, ride-share taxes, minimum wage, and housing among 45 local measures on California ballots Nov. 5

The Daily Brew
Welcome to the Wednesday, Oct. 16, Brew. Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Vaping, ride-share taxes, minimum wage, and housing among 45 local measures on California ballots Nov. 5
  2. Efforts to recall Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) fall short of ballot qualification
  3. SCOTUS to hear three cases Wednesday

Want to hear about last night’s debate? Click here to subscribe to our Daily Presidential News Briefing.

Vaping, ride-share taxes, minimum wage, and housing among 45 local measures on California ballots Nov. 5

I always enjoy reading our reports on local ballot measures because they offer insight into how people are engaging with the government closest to home. Today we’re bringing you a summary of the local ballot measures California voters will see this November. 

Voters in 13 California counties will decide on 45 local ballot measures. In the last three odd-numbered election years in the state, an average of 64 local measures appeared on November ballots: 62 in 2017, 60 in 2015, and 70 in 2013.

Local measuresHere’s a breakdown of the various topics on local ballots:

  • 14 parcel (real estate) tax measures

  • nine sales tax measures

  • four local hotel tax measures

  • four measures that would make city clerks, city treasurers, or both, appointed instead of elected

  • two marijuana tax measures

  • two local spending limit increases

  • two measures concerning development and land use

  • two local business taxes, including a tax on ride-share companies in San Francisco

  • two measures in San Francisco concerning housing costs (bonds and zoning/development regulations)

  • one campaign finance limits and disclosure requirements measure in San Francisco

  • one vaping authorization and regulation measure in San Francisco

  • one charter amendment in San Francisco concerning the city’s disability and aging services commission

  • one measure to increase the minimum wage for hospitality workers in Rancho Palos Verdes

See something we missed? If you know of a local measure on the Nov. 5 ballot in California not included in the above list, please email us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Learn more blank    blankblank   



Efforts to recall Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) fall short of ballot qualification

Two recall campaigns did not collect enough signatures to trigger a recall election that, if successful, would have removed Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) from office. Supporters of each recall effort had until Oct. 14 to turn in 280,050 signatures.

  • The first recall petition, which was supported by the Oregon Republican Party, criticized Brown because she supported legislation during the 2019 legislative session related to a cap-and-trade program and a bill that grants driver’s licenses to immigrants residing in the country without legal permission.

  • The second recall petition, which was headed by Oregon First! PAC and the Flush Down Kate Brown group, criticized Brown over raising taxes, the state’s Public Employees Retirement System (PERS) program, Oregon’s sanctuary state status, and for the same driver’s license bill as the other recall petition.

These recall efforts were two of the six gubernatorial recalls Ballotpedia has tracked in 2019. Four others are currently underway in Alaska, California, Colorado, and New Jersey. From 2003 to 2018, Ballotpedia tracked 17 gubernatorial recall efforts. During that time, two made the ballot and one governor was successfully recalled. Former California Gov. Gray Davis (D) was recalled in 2003; Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) won the election to replace him. In 2012, former Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) was retained in a recall election. North Dakota Gov. Lynn Frazier (R) was the only other governor removed from office through a recall election. That happened in 1921.

Oregon became a Democratic trifecta in 2013. Democrats control the state House 38-22 and the state Senate 18-12. Brown was appointed governor in 2015, and she won a special election in 2016 with 50.7% of the vote. Brown was re-elected in 2018 with 50.1% of the vote. A state government trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and both state legislative chambers.

SCOTUS to hear three cases Wednesday

As we’ve mentioned in previous editions, the Supreme Court is back in session and in its second week of hearing oral arguments. Today, Oct. 16, the court will hear arguments in three cases:

Need to stay on top of the whirlwind world of the federal judiciary of the United States? You can read about this term’s cases and more by subscribing to our monthly newsletter, Bold Justice. 

And in case you’re wondering: Why Bold JusticeThe story behind the name is a fun, quick read.

 



Fulton County Commissioner seat won by Carn in special runoff

Fulton County, Georgia, held a special runoff election for District 6 of the county’s board of commissioners on Tuesday. Joe Carn defeated Gordon Joyner after the two advanced from the special general election on September 17. Nine candidates ran in that race, but no candidate won at least 50% of the vote, which caused the runoff election to be held. The filing deadline for this election passed on June 28, 2019.
 
Ballotpedia provides comprehensive coverage of the 100 largest cities in America by population. This encompasses all city, county, and special district elections appearing on the ballot within those cities. Fulton County is part of that coverage scope. The Fulton County population was 996,319 in 2014, according to the United States Census Bureau, and its county seat is Atlanta.
 
 


Baldon wins special runoff for Atlanta school board

A special runoff election was held on Tuesday for the District 2 seat on the Atlanta Public Schools school board. Aretta Baldon won the election with 551 votes over fellow candidate David Huntley’s 405. A nine-candidate general election had previously been held on September 17, and the top two vote recipients, Baldon and Huntley, advanced to the runoff since neither had won at least 50% of the vote.
 
The special election was called after Byron Amos resigned his seat in January 2019 to run for the Atlanta City Council. He was defeated in the runoff election for that position in April. Amos had served on the board from 2011 to 2019, most recently winning re-election in 2017. Baldon will fill the remainder of Amos’ unexpired term, which ends in 2021.
 
In a June 20 article, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution wrote that the vacant seat “could be a critical swing vote on the board.” Due to the unoccupied seat, the board has had at least one vote end in a 4-4 tie, which led to the automatic defeat of a motion.
 
Atlanta Public Schools served 60,133 students during the 2016-2017 school year.
 


Efforts to recall Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) fall short of ballot qualification

Two recall campaigns did not collect enough signatures to trigger a recall election that, if successful, would have removed Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) from office. Supporters of each recall effort had until Oct. 14 to turn in 280,050 signatures.

  • The first recall petition, which was supported by the Oregon Republican Party, criticized Brown because she supported legislation during the 2019 legislative session related to a cap-and-trade program and a bill that grants driver’s licenses to immigrants residing in the country without legal permission.
  • The second recall petition, which was headed by Oregon First! PAC and the Flush Down Kate Brown group, criticized Brown over raising taxes, the state’s Public Employees Retirement System (PERS) program, Oregon’s sanctuary state status, and for the same driver’s license bill as the other recall petition.

These recall efforts were two of the six gubernatorial recalls Ballotpedia has tracked in 2019. Four others are currently underway in Alaska, California, Colorado, and New Jersey. From 2003 to 2018, Ballotpedia tracked 17 gubernatorial recall efforts. During that time, two made the ballot and one governor was successfully recalled. Former California Gov. Gray Davis (D) was recalled in 2003; Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) won the election to replace him. In 2012, former Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) was retained in a recall election. North Dakota Gov. Lynn Frazier (R) was the only other governor removed from office through a recall election. That happened in 1921.

Oregon became a Democratic trifecta in 2013. Democrats control the state House 38-22 and the state Senate 18-12. Brown was appointed governor in 2015, and she won a special election in 2016 with 50.7% of the vote. Brown was re-elected in 2018 with 50.1% of the vote. A state government trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and both state legislative chambers.

Additional reading:


Elizabeth Warren leads in pageviews for third consecutive week, Joe Biden surpasses Kamala Harris’ lifetime pageviews

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.
 
Elizabeth Warren’s campaign page on Ballotpedia received 2,734 views for the week of October 6-12. Warren’s pageview figure represents 10.8% of the pageviews for all Democratic candidates during the week. Joe Biden had 10.0% of the pageviews for the week, followed by Andrew Yang, also with 10.0%; Yang and Biden were separated by three pageviews.
 
The only Democratic candidates to receive more pageviews last week than the week before were Tom Steyer (up 9.1%) and Amy Klobuchar (up 3.2%).
 
Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews this year with 127,308. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg with 121,736. Last week, Joe Biden surpassed Kamala Harris in overall pageviews this year for the first time, with 111,405 pageviews to Harris’ 110,939.
 


Coin toss decides tied primary in North Carolina

In North Carolina, a coin toss decided who will appear on the general election ballot in District 3 of the Hickory City Council. Three candidates competed in the nonpartisan primary on October 9. Sixty votes were cast in the race; incumbent Danny Seaver advanced with 28 votes, but challengers Nathan Hefner and Daria Jackson were tied at 16 each.
 
Under North Carolina law, tied elections that have fewer than 5,000 votes cast are decided by random selection. In this instance, a coin toss was used to decide the second-place winner. Jackson called heads and the coin turned up tails, meaning Hefner advanced to the November 5 general election.
 
According to the Hickory Daily Record, Hefner stated after the coin toss, “Your voice does count. If you want to see all your dreams and aspirations for Hickory come to life — get out and vote.” Jackson stated, “I’m going to put it in the hands of God and respect his will.”
 
During the 2019 election cycle, Ballotpedia is expanding its coverage of North Carolina in order to provide voters with a comprehensive statewide sample ballot. This coverage includes North Carolina elections spanning 503 cities, towns, and villages, nine school districts, and 17 special districts.
 


Twelve Democratic presidential candidates to debate in Ohio

The Daily Brew
Welcome to the Tuesday, October 15, Brew. Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Twelve Democratic presidential candidates to debate in Ohio
  2. Louisiana Republicans maintain state legislative control after Saturday’s primary
  3. 62% of Brew readers have attended a borough, town, or city council meeting

Twelve Democratic presidential candidates to debate in Ohio

The fourth Democratic presidential debate takes place tonight at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, which is primarily located in Franklin County. Ohio has nine Pivot Counties, which are counties that voted for Donald Trump (R) in 2016 after voting for Barack Obama (D) in 2008 and 2012. Franklin County is one of eight counties that voted for the Democratic nominee in each of the last three presidential elections. Sixty-five counties in Ohio voted for the Republican nominee in the last three presidential races.  

The following 12 candidates will participate: 

    •    Joe Biden
    •    Cory Booker
    •    Pete Buttigieg
    •    Julián Castro
    •    Tulsi Gabbard
    •    Kamala Harris
    •    Amy Klobuchar
    •    Beto O’Rourke
    •    Bernie Sanders
    •    Tom Steyer
    •    Elizabeth Warren
    •    Andrew Yang

Here are five facts about tonight’s debate: 

  • Gabbard and Steyer are the only candidates who did not also participate in the third Democratic debate in Houston on Sept. 12.

  • This debate will feature the most candidates on stage of any single presidential primary debate. The Republican Party held the previous record when 11 candidates debated at one time on September 16, 2015.

  • CNN and The New York Times are hosting the event. Erin Burnett, Anderson Cooper, and Marc Lacey are the moderators.

  • Candidates who did not qualify for this debate can still qualify for the next one, which has different polling and fundraising criteria. The Democratic National Committee announced this week that the fifth primary debate will take place in Georgia on November 20.

  • The previous Democratic debate was held on September 12 in Houston and featured 10 candidates. Since then, one Democratic candidate—Bill de Blasio—has withdrawn from the race.

In other presidential debate news, the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) announced last week the schedule of next year’s presidential and vice presidential debates ahead of the general election. 

Three 2020 presidential debates have been scheduled: 

  • Sept. 29 at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, 

  • Oct. 15 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and 

  • Oct. 22 at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee. 

A vice presidential debate is scheduled for October 7, 2020, at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. 

The CPD also said in a press release that it will invite candidates to participate in these debates who meet three eligibility requirements. They must (1) be constitutionally eligible to run for president, (2) provide evidence of ballot access in enough states to win an Electoral College majority, and (3) demonstrate 15 percent support in national polling.


Louisiana Republicans maintain state legislative control after Saturday’s primary 

Our Brew story Monday covered the outcome of Saturday’s gubernatorial primary in Louisiana. Incumbent Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) and businessman Eddie Rispone (R) advanced to the November 16 general election as the top two finishers out of six candidates. 

One other statewide executive office will be decided in the general election as none of the four candidates received a majority of the vote. Incumbent Kyle Ardoin (R) finished first in the secretary of state primary with 41% and will face Gwen Collins-Greenup (D), who finished second with 34%. Ardoin and two other Republicans received a combined 66% of the vote; Collins-Greenup was the only Democrat in the race. Ardoin defeated Collins-Greenup in a 2018 special election—59% to 41%—after Ardoin assumed office in May 2018 following the resignation of Tom Schedler (R). Ardoin is one of 25 Republican secretaries of state nationwide.

All 39 Louisiana’s state Senate seats were up for election. Although four seats advanced to a general election, partisan control of each is already determined in those districts—three had a pair of Republicans advance while the fourth had a pair of Democrats. Republicans will have a 27-12 majority—a net gain of two seats—which gives them one seat more than the 26-seat threshold required to override gubernatorial vetoes.

Here are Saturday’s other key results:

  • Six statewide executive offices, including the lieutenant governorship and attorney general’s office, were won outright by Republican incumbents.  

  • Voters decided all eight seats on the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education—currently under a 6-2 Republican majority. Seven races were decided with none resulting in a change in party control. The results of the District 6 seat—an open seat previously held by Kathy Edmonston (R)—is considered too close to call. 

  • In Louisiana’s state House elections, Republicans are assured of winning at least 63 seats, Democrats 33 seats, and one was won by an independent. This includes races that were decided in the primary as well as those where both of the top two finishers are from the same party. Control of eight seats will be determined in the November 16 general election. A veto-proof majority in the state House requires 70 seats. In Louisiana, congressional and state legislative districts are drawn by the state legislature during redistricting.

  • Since Republicans have maintained control of both houses of the state legislature, trifecta control of state government will be at stake in the gubernatorial election. The state will maintain divided government if Edwards wins re-election. If Rispone wins, Louisiana will become a Republican trifecta.

  • Louisiana voters approved two constitutional amendments and rejected two, according to unofficial election night results. 

62% of Brew readers have attended a borough, town, or city council meeting

Over the last few weeks, our What’s the Tea? questions have been part of a series asking Brew readers whether they’ve ever participated or done certain things related to politics and policy, such as attending or speaking at governmental meetings or signing candidate or initiative petitions. 

Remember that our weekly survey question appears in the Brew every Friday, and we don’t tabulate responses until Monday afternoon. So if you don’t get a chance to answer the survey until the weekend, go ahead and respond then – it’s not too late to hear from you! 

Survey results

 

 



12 Dems take stage tonight in largest presidential primary debate

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

October 15, 2019: Twelve Democratic presidential candidates will meet on stage Tuesday in the fourth primary debate of the 2020 election cycle. Hawaii and Kansas will use ranked-choice voting in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary. blank    blankblank   


 

Which election featured the first presidential primary debate?

Notable Quotes of the Day

“Omission from November’s debate could effectively choke off a candidate’s visibility and fundraising and make it impossible for them to mount a realistic challenge. Castro, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, Klobuchar and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas are all on the cut line. … There’s no better way for those candidates to engineer the big moments they need than to tangle with one of the front-runners.”

– Stephen Collinson, CNN

“Premeditated attack strategies have a mostly losing record so far. The most successful of them—Kamala Harris’ biographical repudiation of Biden’s recording on busing—lent Harris only a short-lived boost as her moment of moral righteousness soon faded to equivocation.
John Delaney earned plenty of screen time in the second debate acting as the moderate counterweight to Warren, but moderate voters already had their preferred counterweight in Biden, and they also like Elizabeth Warren more than they like John Delaney. Tulsi Gabbard, similarly, took a hatchet to Harris in the second debate, a moment that may have hurt Harris but hardly helped Gabbard. And in the third debate, Julián Castro famously ‘insinuated’ that Joe Biden was losing his mind and was rewarded with a sharp collapse in his net favorability.”

– Jim NewellSlate

Democrats

  • The Democratic National Committee approved proposals from the state parties in Hawaii and Kansas to use ranked-choice voting in the 2020 presidential primary.

  • Joe BidenCory BookerPete ButtigiegJulián CastroTulsi GabbardKamala HarrisAmy KlobucharBeto O’RourkeBernie SandersTom SteyerElizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang will participate in the fourth Democratic presidential primary debate Tuesday in Westerville, Ohio. Erin Burnett, Anderson Cooper, and Marc Lacey will moderate the event.

  • Michael BennetBidenSteve BullockButtigiegHarris, and Sanders participated in the second UFCW presidential candidate labor forum in Iowa Sunday.

  • BennetBullockJohn DelaneyKlobucharO’RourkeJoe Sestak, and Marianne Williamson answered questions on retirement issues in a survey produced by Yahoo Finance and the Funding Our Future Campaign.

  • ButtigiegKlobucharTim RyanSteyer, and Yang attended the Ohio Democratic Party’s annual state dinner at the Greater Columbus Convention Center Sunday.

  • In an ethics plan released Monday, Biden proposed establishing a constitutional amendment to eliminate private dollar funding of federal campaigns, strengthening whistleblower laws, and establishing a commission on federal ethics.

  • Buttigieg released a digital ad in Iowa Tuesday critical of Medicare for All. It features political analysts discussing the healthcare proposals of Sanders and Warren.

  • Sanders proposed requiring corporations with at least $100 million in revenue and all publicly traded companies increase employee ownership stakes by providing 2 percent of stocks to their workers until at least 20 percent of the company is employee-owned. His corporate accountability plan released Monday also called for having workers directly elect 45 percent of the board of directors.

  • Sestak began airing his first ad in New Hampshire Sunday, which focuses on his military and congressional career.

Republicans

  • Mark Sanford discussed foreign policy and the Trump administration’s policy on Syria and Turkey in a CNN interview Sunday.

  • Donald Trump Jr., Kimberly Guilfoyle, and campaign manager Brad Parscale will host a “Keep America Great” panel Tuesday in San Antonio, preceding Donald Trump’s Thursday rally in Dallas.

  • Joe Walsh is campaigning Tuesday in Davenport, Iowa.

On the Cusp: Tracking Potential Candidates

Flashback: October 15, 2015

Ben Carson and Donald Trump submitted a joint letter to CNBC saying neither would agree to attend the month’s debate if opening and closing statements were not permitted and the event ran longer than 120 minutes. 

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