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RNC raises twice as much as DNC for the third straight month

The Republican National Committee outraised the Democratic National Committee by more than 2-to-1 for the third straight month, according to July filings with the Federal Election Commission. Republicans led in national and Senatorial committee fundraising while Democrats led in House committee fundraising.
 
The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $5.5 million and spent $3.8 million in July, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $5.7 million and spent $4.4 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 20.7% more than the DSCC ($34.6 million to $28.1 million).
 
On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $12.5 million and spent $4.2 million in July, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $9.0 million and spent $4.0 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the DCCC has raised 32.4% more than the NRCC ($61.7 million to $44.5 million).
 
The fundraising gap also widened among the two national committees. In July, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised $8.5 million and spent $7.5 million while the Republican National Committee (RNC) raised $20.8 million and spent $14.3 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 77.4% more than the DNC ($97.1 million to $42.9 million).
 
So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 28.2% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($176.3 million to $132.7 million).
 


31 candidates file to run in New Hampshire’s largest school district

In New Hampshire, 31 candidates have filed to run for 14 seats on the Manchester School District school board. A primary is scheduled for September 17, and the general election is on November 5. The filing deadline for this election passed on July 19. The elections are nonpartisan.
 
Nine of 14 incumbents are running for re-election in 2019; in comparison, all 14 incumbents filed in 2017. Here’s who filed to run for each seat:
 
  • At-large: Carlos Gonzalez, Jason Hodgdon, Joseph Lachance, Gene Martin, James O’Connell, and Lara Quiroga are competing for the two at-large seats being vacated by incumbents Richard Girard and Patrick Long.
  • Ward 1: Amber Jodoin and James Porter are competing for the seat being vacated by incumbent Sarah Ambrogi.
  • Ward 2: Incumbent Kathleen Kelley Arnold is facing Sean Parr.
  • Ward 3: Incumbent Mary Ngwanda Georges is facing Karen Soule.
  • Ward 4: Incumbent Leslie Want is facing Mark Flanders.
  • Ward 5: Incumbent Lisa Freeman is facing Jeremy Dobson.
  • Ward 6: Incumbent Dan Bergeron is facing William Bergquist and Jon DiPietro.
  • Ward 7: Christopher Potter and William Shea are competing for the seat being vacated by incumbent Ross Terrio.
  • Ward 8: Incumbent Jimmy Lehoux is facing Peter Perich.
  • Ward 9: Incumbent Arthur Beaudry is facing Candace Moulton.
  • Ward 10: Incumbent John Avard is facing state Rep. Jane Beaulieu.
  • Ward 11: Brittany LeClear-Ping and Nicole Leapley are competing for the seat being vacated by incumbent Katie Desrochers.
  • Ward 12: Incumbent Kelley Anne Thomas is facing Andrew Toland.
 
The Manchester School District served 14,219 students during the 2016-2017 school year.
 


Nashville Metro Council elections draw 100 candidates

In Tennessee, the city of Nashville is holding nonpartisan general elections for mayor and all 41 metro council seats on August 1. The candidate filing deadline passed on May 16, and a runoff election is scheduled for September 12, if necessary. The runoff will only be held if an election occurs where no single candidate receives a majority of the vote.
 
The Nashville Metro Council’s 41 seats include 35 members elected by district and six members elected at large. One of the at-large members is the city’s vice-mayor, who is elected separately from the other at-large members.
 
The vice-mayoral election drew two candidates, incumbent Jim Shulman and challenger Robert Sawyers. The other 40 council races feature a total of 98 candidates, which includes 26 incumbents. Fourteen of the 35 district seats are open elections without an incumbent in the race, while all five at-large incumbents filed for re-election. In 2015, the Nashville Metro Council elections drew 113 candidates. This included 15 incumbents.
 
Nashville is the second-largest city in Tennessee and the 24th-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 


De Blasio unveils first major policy proposal of presidential campaign

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

July 24, 2019: Bill de Blasio introduced the first major policy proposal of his campaign on workforce issues. Roughly half of the Democratic field will speak at the NAACP presidential forum in Detroit.


 Facebook Ad Spending (July 15-21)

Notable Quote of the Day

“No southerners are [on the debate stage], unless you count Texans Castro and O’Rourke or border state candidates Biden and Delaney, which I don’t.

So what?

Democrats are abandoning their most successful strategy for winning recent presidential elections: putting a southerner on the ticket. From 1964 until 2008, every victorious Democratic presidential candidate had a southern accent: Lyndon Johnson in 1964, Jimmy Carter in 1974, Bill Clinton in 1992 and 1996 and Al Gore, who won the popular vote in 2000.

Arguably, it happened again in 2016 when Hillary Clinton, with her deep Arkansas and southern connections, won the popular vote.”

– D.G. Martin, North Carolina Bookwatch host

Democrats

  • Joe BidenCory BookerPete ButtigiegJulián CastroJohn DelaneyKamala HarrisAmy KlobucharBeto O’RourkeBernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warrenwill speak at the NAACP’s 2020 Presidential Candidates Forum in Detroit, Michigan, on Wednesday.

  • Michael Bennet appeared on an episode of Hacks on Tap with David Axelrod and Mike Murphy to discuss the state of the Democratic Party.

  • Biden campaigned in New Orleans, Louisiana, with stops at the Youth Empowerment Project and a fundraiser.

  • Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan endorsed Biden.

  • In an op-ed in BuzzFeed NewsBill de Blasio introduced the first major policy proposal of his campaign on workforce issues. He called for two weeks of paid time off for all workers, a national minimum wage of $15, and replacing at-will employment with a “just cause” termination policy.

  • Steve Bullock participated in a 2020 forum series hosted by women’s coworking space company The Riveter in Seattle, Washington.

  • In an interview on Outkick the Coverage with Clay TravisTulsi Gabbarddiscussed sports, the military, and the foreign policy credentials of other candidates.

  • John Hickenlooper wrote an op-ed in Fortune about entrepreneurship and tariffs. 

  • Jay Inslee talked about climate change solutions in an episode of Why Is This Happening with Chris Hayes.

  • O’Rourke discussed his cross-party appeal and Trump’s North Carolina rally in an interview on The View. His wife, Amy O’Rourke, also joined the interview, marking her first national appearance.

  • Tim Ryan talked sports and politics in an episode of Fired Up with Brad Jenkins.

  • Joe Sestak continued to campaign in Iowa, speaking with the Poweshiek County Democrats Tuesday night.

  • Warren introduced the Student Loan Debt Relief Act of 2019 with Rep. James E. Clyburn, which would cancel up to $50,000 of student debt for individuals with a household income of less than $100,000. Partial debt relief would be available for households earning more than $100,000 on a sliding scale.

  • Marianne Williamson spoke about criminal sentencing disparities, white-collar crime, and voter suppression at the NAACP national convention in Detroit, Michigan, on Tuesday.

Republicans

  • Donald Trump spoke at the Turning Point Teen Student Action Summit for conservative high school students.

  • Bill Weld will speak at the NAACP’s 2020 Presidential Candidates Forum in Detroit, Michigan, on Wednesday.

Flashback: July 24, 2015

The New York Times reported that government investigators found classified information on Hillary Clinton’s private email server. The Clinton campaign responded that any classified information found on the server would have been labeled classified after the fact.



Ballotpedia’s Daily Brew: The longest-running trifecta

Today’s Brew identifies those states that have rarely seen recent changes in their trifecta status + announces our newest Learning Journey  
The Daily Brew
Welcome to the Wednesday, July 24, Brew. Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. One state—Utah—has been a GOP trifecta since 1985
  2. Introducing our newest Learning Journey on deference
  3. Today! Our briefing on the Supreme Court and the administrative state

Utah has had 34 straight years of trifecta control – the longest active streak in the nation

As I’ve talked about often in the Brew, a state government trifecta describes when one political party holds the governorship and majorities in both state legislative chambers. While most states have seen at least one change in their trifecta status within the last 20 years, five states—Nebraska, Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Utah—have not had a trifecta change since at least 1999. In Utah, Republicans have controlled the governor’s office, House, and Senate since 1985.

Three more fast facts about trifectas:

  • Four states—Colorado, Illinois, Nevada, and New Hampshire— have seen their trifecta status change twice since 2014. Colorado and Illinois both went from having a Democratic trifecta to divided government in 2014 and back to a Democratic trifecta in 2018. Nevada went from a Republican trifecta to divided government in 2016 and to a Democratic trifecta in 2018. New Hampshire went from divided government to a Republican trifecta in 2016 and back to divided government in 2018.

  • Heading into the 2010 elections, there were 25 total trifectas—16 Democratic and nine Republican—in the United States.

  • There have been 62 trifecta changes since 2010.

In 2019, elections could determine the trifecta status of five states—Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Virginia. Kentucky and Mississippi are Republican trifectas while New Jersey is a Democratic one. Louisiana and Virginia have a divided government, and in both states, Republicans control the legislature and Democrats the governorship.

There are currently 36 state government trifectas—14 Democratic and 22 Republican—and 14 states with divided government. The 14 states that are governed by Democratic trifectas include 34.4% of the U.S. population, and 41.9% of the U.S. population lives in the 22 states governed by Republican trifectas.

Trifectas

Learn more

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Briefing: SCOTUS 2018-2019 term and the administrative state
Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has issued rulings in the 69 cases the court heard this term, let’s look back on the rulings impacting the administrative state. 


Introducing our newest Learning Journey on deference 

We’re excited to debut our eighth Learning Journey. As a refresher, our Learning Journeys give you a series of daily emails with information, examples, and exercises to help you broaden your knowledge of U.S. government and politics and help you understand each aspect of a particular concept.

Our most recent journey is on judicial deference. In the context of administrative law, deference applies when a federal court yields to an agency’s interpretation of either a statute that Congress instructed the agency to administer or a regulation promulgated by the agency.

Our Learning Journey here is a 4-day overview of deference in the context of the administrative state. We cover the most commonly applied federal deference doctrines—including Chevron deference, Auer deference, and Skidmore deference—and examine the different approaches to deference in the states. Our journey also features leading support and opposition arguments from administrative law scholars, a look at the future of deference, and various reform proposals. Auer deference—which requires courts to accept an agency’s interpretation of its own ambiguous regulation—was the key principle considered in the Supreme Court’s review of Kisor v. Wilkie this past term.

Last week, we introduced a Learning Journey on judicial review, which refers to the power of courts to interpret the law and overturn any legislative or executive actions that are inconsistent with the law. The concept of judicial review dates back to the Supreme Court’s decision in Marbury v. Madison in 1803, which held that “a legislative act contrary to the constitution is not law.” Judicial review is a key concept in administrative law and deference is a principle of judicial review.

If you want to learn more about these principles, taking one of our Learning Journeys is a smart—and free—way to do so. Just click the link below to get started.

Our briefing on the Supreme Court and the administrative state is today

Later this morning I will be hosting a free Ballotpedia briefing looking back on the Supreme Court’s most recent term. We’ll provide an overview of the term just ended and look ahead to some of the cases and issues that are already on the docket for the 2019-20 term. And we’ll focus in particular on the Court’s rulings from last term that affect the administrative state, involving principles such as deference, judicial review, and the nondelegation doctrine.

We’ve just about wrapped up our preparations for today’s webinar, and I have to admit, I’m genuinely excited about the topics we’ll be discussing. These administrative law principles affect how our three branches of government—executive, judicial, and legislative—interact to shape public policy, and the discussion of these Supreme Court cases provide real-life examples of those principles in action.

The briefing starts at 11 am CST. I hope you can join us in a few hours for this very informative and interesting session. There are still spaces available—click the link below to reserve your spot. And if you cannot make it—signup and you’ll receive an email with the recording.

Ballotpedia depends on the support of our readers.

The Lucy Burns Institute, publisher of Ballotpedia, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. All donations are tax deductible to the extent of the law. Donations to the Lucy Burns Institute or Ballotpedia do not support any candidates or campaigns.
 


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One state has been under the same party’s trifecta control since 1985

A state government trifecta occurs when one political party holds the governorship and majorities in both state legislative chambers. While most states have seen at least one change in their trifecta status within the last 20 years, five states—Nebraska, Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Utah—have not had a trifecta change since at least 1999. In Utah, Republicans have controlled the governor’s office, House, and Senate since 1985.
 
There are currently 36 state government trifectas and 14 divided state governments. The 14 states that are governed by Democratic trifectas include 34.4% of the U.S. population, and 41.9% of the U.S. population lives in the 22 states governed by Republican trifectas.
 
In 2019, elections could determine the trifecta status of five states: Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Virginia.
As of July 2019, we’ve ranked the trifecta vulnerability for each of these states as follows:
  • Kentucky: Somewhat vulnerable Republican trifecta
  • Louisiana: Slight possibility of a Republican trifecta forming, low possibility of a Democratic trifecta forming
  • Mississippi: Moderately vulnerable Republican trifecta
  • New Jersey: Non-vulnerable Democratic trifecta
  • Virginia: Moderate possibility of a Democratic trifecta forming, moderate possibility of remaining under divided government
Additional reading:


Harris leads Democratic candidates in Ballotpedia pageviews for third consecutive week

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.
 
Sen. Kamala Harris’ campaign page on Ballotpedia received 3,772 pageviews for the week of July 13-20.
 
Harris’ pageview figure represents 9 percent of the pageviews for all Democratic candidates during the week. Former Vice President Joe Biden had 8.8 percent of the candidate pageviews for the week, while Sen. Elizabeth Warren had 7.1 percent.
 
Three in five of the Democratic campaigns’ pageviews increased this week with Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders both logging an increase of approximately 16 percent each.
 
The top three candidates in lifetime pageviews are South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg with 90,329, entrepreneur Andrew Yang with 75,963, and Harris with 75,621.
 
On the GOP side, former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld had 9,867 pageviews this week to President Donald Trump’s 1,459.
 


Biden calls for decriminalizing marijuana and eliminating private prisons at federal level

 

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

July 23, 2019: Joe Biden released his criminal justice platform on Tuesday. Kamala Harris introduced two bills on water infrastructure and marijuana-related offenses.


 

Which presidential election had the highest estimated voter turnout?

Notable Quote of the Day

“Since entering the presidential race, Ms. Warren has taken pictures with more than 38,000 people, her campaign estimates. Ms. Warren says the photos are part of her effort to build what she likes to call a ‘grass-roots movement.’ …

Other Democratic candidates also take pictures with voters, even if they lack the well-orchestrated selfie line that Ms. Warren employs. Senator Bernie Sanders recently started forming a selfie line at his events. Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s campaign has promised photos to people who spring for $500 or $1,000 tickets to some grass-roots fund-raisers. …

In a primary race where Democrats have two dozen candidates to choose from, a personal moment with the candidate can make a difference.”

– Thomas Kaplan, Tamir Kalifa, and Eden Weingart, The New York Times 

Democrats

  • Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson endorsed Joe Biden Monday, becoming the sixth member of the Congressional Black Caucus to do so. 

  • Biden issued his criminal justice platform Tuesday. He proposes treating rather than incarcerating addicts, increasing funding for drug courts, eliminating sentencing disparities between crack and cocaine cases, and ending the use of private prisons at the federal level. His plan also calls for decriminalizing marijuana, expunging marijuana-related offenses, and categorizing marijuana as a schedule II drug.

  • Bill de Blasio criticized Con Edison’s handling of the heatwave in New York City following outages over the past two weekends. He said its response “would be absolutely unacceptable if it were a public entity.”

  • In an interview on Late Night with Seth Meyers, Cory Booker spoke about today’s political climate and the U.S. Senate.

  • Steve Bullock launched his official campaign merchandise shop.

  • Pete Buttigieg proposed raising the maximum annual earnings subject to the Social Security payroll tax from $132,900 to $250,000 to keep the program solvent.

  • John Delaney participated in the “20 Questions for 2020” series on NowThisNews, discussing climate change, unions, and Trump’s businesses.

  • In an interview on The ViewTulsi Gabbard discussed Puerto Rico and her concern with decriminalizing unauthorized border crossings.

  • In response to a report in The New Yorker about Sen. Al Franken, Kirsten Gillibrand said she did not regret calling for Franken’s resignation following sexual misconduct allegations.

  • Kamala Harris introduced the Water Justice Act Monday, which would call for $250 billion to be spent on water infrastructure and clean and safe drinking water programs.

  • Harris will also introduce the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act Tuesday to decriminalize marijuana, expunge past marijuana-related convictions, and bar the deportation of immigrants based on a marijuana charge.

  • John Hickenlooper posted a digital ad highlighting his experience owning a brewery and serving as governor of Colorado.

  • Jay Inslee attended a forum hosted by several Democratic clubs in Palisades, California.

  • In a Washington Post Live interviewAmy Klobuchar discussed the Affordable Care Act, climate change, and immigration.

  • Seth Moulton spoke about national security and election security, climate change, and cyber issues in an interview on the Evening Beat.

  • Beto O’Rourke toured Ellis Island and hosted a “Bands with Beto” campaign event in New York Monday.

  • The Associated Press profiled the communications network Bernie Sanders has created as an alternative to traditional media.

  • Joe Sestak campaigned in Iowa, speaking to the Clarke County Democrats Monday.

  • Tom Steyer spoke about his policy priorities, diplomatic ties, gun violence, and other issues on WBUR’s Foresight.

  • In a post to Medium, Elizabeth Warren predicted an economic crisis would develop unless the U.S. took several preventive steps. She called for reducing household debt, enforcing leveraged lending guidance, strengthening manufacturing by investing in green research, and eliminating or automatically raising the debt ceiling. 

  • Marianne Williamson discussed establishing a Department of Peace during an interview on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

  • In his plan for veterans, Andrew Yang proposed allowing veterans to receive relevant civilian certifications without additional licensing and providing in-state tuition at any public school in any state. Yang also called for increasing funding for veterans crisis lines and changing the Veterans Affairs healthcare network.

Republicans

  • Donald Trump’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., is writing a book titled Triggered: How the Left Thrives on Hate and Wants to Silence Us. It will be released on November 5, 2019, roughly one year before the 2020 presidential election.

  • Bill Weld continued to campaign in New Hampshire, speaking at the Manchester Rotary Monday.

Flashback: July 23, 2015

Donald Trump toured the U.S.-Mexico border in Laredo, Texas.

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Ballotpedia’s Daily Brew: We’re looking for interns to join our team!

 Today’s Brew debuts Ballotpedia’s fall internship program + provides an overview of Memphis’ municipal elections  
The Daily Brew
Welcome to the Tuesday, July 23, Brew. Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Let’s be coworkers! Apply to Ballotpedia’s internship program
  2. Fewer candidates running for mayor, city council in Memphis compared with 2015
  3. Federal Register surpasses the 35,000-page mark for 2019

Let’s be co-workers! Apply to Ballotpedia’s internship program

We are looking for interns for our Fall 2019 program. Pass this along to anyone you know who might be interested. We are looking for Editorial, Communications, and Tech interns.

As an intern, you will go through a similar onboarding experience to full-time Ballotpedia employees. You will learn how to publish content on Ballotpedia, learn about all we do to prevent and detect bias in our resources, and much more. Following orientation, you will join the Editorial, Communications, or Tech team, working alongside staff members. Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know about our program.

  • Ballotpedia’s Fall 2019 internship program will run from Monday, August 26 through Friday, December 13. 

  • The internship is a part-time program; interns will work approximately 20 hours per week depending on their availability. 

  • Ballotpedia is happy to facilitate credit for your internship experience if that is available to you. If you will be seeking credit for your internship, and if there is anything that Ballotpedia will need to do to assist you, please include that information in the same file as your cover letter.

  • Several current full-time employees at Ballotpedia started as interns. 

Apply here

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Beyond the Headlines

Now that SCOTUS has wrapped up their 2018-2019 term, let’s look back at how many cases the court heard, how many were overturned, and how the justices ruled. Watch the latest Beyond the Headlines video now


Fewer candidates running for mayor, city council in Memphis compared with 2015 

The filing deadline to run for both mayor and all 13 city council seats passed last week in Memphis, Tennessee. The city is holding general elections on October 3. Memphis is the largest city in Tennessee and the 20th-largest city in the U.S. by population.

Incumbent mayor Jim Strickland faces nine challengers in his bid for a second term. Strickland—who was first elected to Memphis’ city council in 2007—defeated then-Mayor A.C. Wharton in 2015. I don’t live in Memphis, but as a political observer here are a few facts I found interesting when I was talking with our team about the election. 

  • Memphis has two sets of district boundaries for its city council. It has seven regular council districts, with one member elected from each. It is also divided in half to form two super districts that elect an additional three representatives each.

  • As of July 19, 42 candidates had qualified to run for city council, and the applications for another four were still being verified—an average of 3.54 candidates per seat.  Twenty-four candidates are running for the regular council seats and six of seven incumbents are seeking re-election. Twenty-two candidates filed for the six super district seats, including three incumbents. 

  • In the most recent regular election for city council in 2015, 60 candidates ran—an average of 4.62 candidates per seat. That year, all seven incumbents who ran for re-election won.

In the 100 largest cities in the country from 2014 to 2018, 16 of 96 mayors—16.7%—and 127 of 1,002—12.7%—were defeated in their bids for re-election.

Federal Register surpasses the 35,000-page mark for 2019

Here’s something we track regularly at Ballotpedia, but we haven’t provided an update about in the Brew for a few months. Each week, we monitor page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of our Administrative State Project. The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

Last week, the number of pages in the Federal Register increased by 1,312 pages, bringing the year-to-date total to 35,002 pages. During the same week in 2018, the number of pages in the Federal Register increased by 1,994 pages for a year-to-date total of 34,752 pages. As of July 19, the 2019 total was more than the 2018 total by 250 pages.

The Trump administration has added an average of 1,207 pages to the Federal Register each week in 2019 as of July 19. Over the course of 2018, the Trump administration added an average of 1,301 pages to the Federal Register each week. During the Obama administration, the Federal Register increased by an average of 1,658 pages per week.

Our Administrative State Project includes information about the administrative and regulatory activities of the United States government as well as concepts, laws, court cases, executive orders, scholarly work, and other material related to the administrative state. You can get an introduction to some of these principles by joining our free briefing tomorrow on how this term’s Supreme Court rulings affect the administrative state. There’s still time to register by clicking here.

And to stay up to date on actions at both the federal and state level related to rulemaking, the separation of powers, and due process, subscribe to our monthly Checks and Balancesnewsletter.

 

 



Memphis City Council elections draw fewer candidates than in 2015

The filing deadline to run for election in Memphis passed on July 18, and all 13 city council seats are on the October 3 ballot. As of July 19, 42 candidates had qualified for the ballot, and another four potential candidates’ papers were still being verified.
 
Including the four candidates who are still in the process of making the ballot, an average of 3.54 candidates filed per seat. Each seat has at least two candidates on the ballot or in the process of getting on the ballot. The District 7 seat drew the most candidates with nine facing off in October. Six city council seats drew two candidates each, two seats drew three candidates each, two seats drew four candidates each, one seat drew five candidates, and one seat drew six candidates. Nine incumbents filed to run for re-election.
 
The most recent election for all 13 city council seats was held in 2015. Sixty candidates appeared on the ballot, and all 13 seats were contested. An average of 4.62 candidates filed per seat. That year, District 7 also saw nine candidates file for the seat, which was again the highest number of candidates in a race. One city council seat drew two candidates, six seats drew three candidates each, one seat drew four candidates, one seat drew six candidates, two seats drew seven candidates each, and one seat drew eight candidates. Seven incumbents filed to run for re-election in 2015, and all seven won.
 
Memphis is the largest city in Tennessee and the 20th-largest city in the U.S. by population.