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Stories about Arizona

These Arizona State Senate candidates raised the most money and lost

Elections for all 30 seats in the Arizona State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 16-14 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates who raised the most money and lost their election. In the 2022 election cycle, 25 of 30 general elections were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

State Senate candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election

This information comes from candidate reports to the Arizona Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Oct. 22, 2022.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Nancy K. Barto – $390,158 – District 4 (Lost general 50% – 50%)
  • Jeanne Casteen – $246,783 – District 2 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Cindy Hans – $216,522 – District 13 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Robert Scantlebury – $115,214 – District 9 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Roxana Holzapfel – $84,307 – District 8 (Lost general 37% – 63%)

State Senate candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Arizona Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Kate Brophy McGee – $712,517 – District 28 (Lost general 50% – 50%)
  • Felicia French – $674,768 – District 6 (Lost general 45% – 55%)
  • Ajlan Kurdoglu – $489,904 – District 17 (Lost general 47% – 53%)
  • Douglas Ervin – $367,456 – District 20 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • JoAnna Mendoza – $221,247 – District 11 (Lost general 46% – 54%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These Arizona State House candidates raised the most money and lost

Elections for all 30 districts in the Arizona House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 31-29 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates who raised the most money and lost their election. In the 2022 election cycle, 30 of 30 general elections were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

House candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election

This information comes from candidate reports to the Arizona Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Oct. 22, 2022.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • James Chaston – $163,062 – District 12 (Lost general 21% – 29%, 29%)
  • Maria Syms – $160,610 – District 4 (Lost general 32% – 35%, 33%)
  • Dana Allmond – $134,174 – District 17 (Lost general 25% – 26%, 26%)
  • Julie Willoughby – $97,640 – District 13 (Lost general 32% – 35%, 33%)
  • Terry Roe – $93,745 – District 12 (Lost general 21% – 29%, 29%)

House candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Arizona Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Coral Evans – $813,792 – District 6 (Lost general 25% – 29%, 26%)
  • Kathy Knecht – $370,450 – District 21 (Lost general 31% – 33%, 36%)
  • Eric Kurland – $279,493 – District 23 (Lost general 28% – 35%, 37%)
  • Anthony Kern – $189,307 – District 20 (Lost general 32% – 34%, 34%)
  • Brendan Lyons – $177,806 – District 9 (Lost general 27% – 36%, 36%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Lawsuit filed regarding constitutionality of Arizona Proposition 209, which addressed medical and other debt

On Nov. 8, Arizona voters approved Proposition 209 with 72% of the vote. The citizen-initiated measure is designed to reduce interest rates on debt accrued from receiving healthcare services, as well as increase the value of certain property and assets exempt from debt collection processes.

Maricopa County Superior Court Judge John Blanchard signed a temporary restraining order preventing the enforcement of provisions of Proposition 209 on Dec. 8. Plaintiffs filed a lawsuit to stop enforcement of the initiative. The plaintiffs include the Arizona Creditors Bar Association Inc. and the Protect Our Arizona PAC. An evidentiary hearing was scheduled to take place on Friday, December 16.

The lawsuit addressed the constitutionality of Proposition 209, specifically a savings clause-type provision that says that the law applies prospectively only, but that it does not apply to “right and duties that matured” before the effective date of the law. 

The lawsuit says that the language of the initiative is vague, and that there are conflicting interpretations from the Arizona judiciary, citing a Proposition 209 information sheet posted on the judiciary’s Self Service Center, which said “the proposition was unclear on when the changes to the garnishment rates would take effect, but if a debtor was being garnished on December 5, 2022, the previous rates would be continued.” The lawsuit says that due to conflicting interpretations, and lack of specific guidance regarding the savings clause provision, Proposition 209 is void under the First and Fourteenth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution, as well as Article 2, Section 4 of the Arizona Constitution. 

Rodd McLeod, spokesperson for Healthcare Rising Arizona, which led the campaign for Proposition 209, responded to the lawsuit. He said, “The people of Arizona have passed this overwhelmingly. 72% of our state voted that we should limit interest on medical debt and we should increase the protections for families that are going through that, so people don’t lose their homes because of an emergency. We think that predatory lenders should respect the will of the people.”

Healthcare Rising Arizona led the campaign in support of Proposition 209. The campaign reported $12.7 million in contributions and $12.5 million in expenditures in the past two years.

If Proposition 209 goes into effect, it would decrease the maximum annual interest rate on debt accrued from healthcare services from 10% to 3% or equal to either the weekly average one-year constant maturity treasury yield, whichever is less. It would also increase the amount of a homestead exempt from debt collection from $250,000 to $400,000. The amount of money held in an account that would be exempt from debt collection would also increase from $300 to $5,000. The amounts on other property exempt from debt collection, such as motor vehicles and household furnishings, would also be increased.

Proposition 209 was written to go into effect on December 5, 2022, but enforcement is on hold pending the lawsuit.



These are the results in the top five most expensive Arizona State House elections

Elections for all 30 districts in the Arizona House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. All 30 districts had general elections with more than one candidate. The Arizona House has two seats per district.

Across all contested general elections, candidates raised $6.8 million. Incumbents raised an average of $96,163 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $64,909 per candidate.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five general elections with the most fundraising in the House of Representatives. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 4 $996,330 Brian Fernandez (D), Joel John (R) Matt Gress, Laura Terech, and Maria Syms
District 9 $504,665 Christopher Mathis (D), Pamela Powers Hannley (D) Lorena Austin, Seth Blattman, Kathy Pearce, and Mary Ann Mendoza
District 2 $490,175 Andrea Dalessandro (D), Daniel Hernandez Jr. (D) Judy Schwiebert, Justin Wilmeth, and Christian Lamar
District 3 $394,224 Andres Cano (D), Alma Hernandez (D) Joseph Chaplik, Alexander Kolodin, Georgia Flanagan, and John Skirbst
District 13 $382,943 Joanne Osborne (R), Tim Dunn (R) Jennifer Pawlik, Liz Harris, and Julie Willoughby

The officeholders above are listed for the current districts they held. However, this is a redistricting year, so candidates have been identified below as incumbents even if they are running in a different district than they currently hold.

#1 District 4 – $996,330

Matt Gress raised $534,888, Laura Terech raised $300,832, and Maria Syms raised $160,610.

Matt Gress won with 35 percent of the vote, Laura Terech won with 33 percent of the vote, and Maria Syms received 32 percent of the vote.

#2 District 9 – $504,665

Lorena Austin raised $235,769, Seth Blattman raised $179,128, Mary Ann Mendoza raised $48,107, and Kathy Pearce raised $41,660.

Lorena Austin won with 27 percent of the vote, Seth Blattman won with 25 percent of the vote, Kathy Pearce received 25 percent of the vote, and Mary Ann Mendoza received 24 percent of the vote.

#3 District 2 – $490,175

Incumbent Justin Wilmeth raised $140,323, Incumbent Judy Schwiebert raised $286,378, and Christian Lamar raised $63,474.

Judy Schwiebert won with 35 percent of the vote, Justin Wilmeth won with 33 percent of the vote, and Christian Lamar received 32 percent of the vote.

#4 District 3 – $394,224

Incumbent Joseph Chaplik raised $264,263, Alexander Kolodin raised $129,961, Georgia Flanagan raised $0, and John Skirbst raised $0.

Joseph Chaplik won with 52 percent of the vote, Alexander Kolodin won with 48 percent of the vote, Georgia Flanagan received 0 percent of the vote, and John Skirbst received 0 percent of the vote.

#5 District 13 – $382,943

Incumbent Jennifer Pawlik raised $201,393, Julie Willoughby raised $97,640, and Liz Harris raised $83,911.

Jennifer Pawlik won with 35 percent of the vote, Liz Harris won with 33 percent of the vote, and Julie Willoughby received 32 percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Nine of 12 Arizona State Senate committee chairs raised less money than the average member this cycle

Elections for all 30 seats in the Arizona State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 16-14 majority heading into the election.

Committee chair fundraising

State legislative committee chairs set a committee’s legislative agenda. The average amount raised by delegates who did not serve as a committee chair was $227,005. The funds raised by each of the State Senate’s 12 committee chairs are shown below.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Nine of 12 Arizona House committee chairs raised less money than the average member this cycle

Elections for all 30 seats in the Arizona House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 31-29 majority heading into the election.

Committee chair fundraising

State legislative committee chairs set a committee’s legislative agenda. Some committee chairs raise significantly more money than their non-chair counterparts in the state legislature. The average amount raised by delegates who did not serve as a committee chair was $148,198. The funds raised by each of the House’s 12 committee chairs are shown below.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These are the results in the top five most expensive Arizona State Senate elections

General elections for all 30 districts in the Arizona State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Of the 30 districts up for election in 2022, 25 had a general election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested general elections, candidates raised $7.8 million. Incumbents raised an average of $422,551 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $62,378 per candidate.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five general elections with the most fundraising in the State Senate. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 7 $3,283,583 Theresa Hatathlie (D) Wendy Rogers, Kyle Nitschke, and Jeff Daniels
District 4 $786,400 Lisa Otondo (D) Christine Marsh and Nancy K. Barto
District 13 $444,591 Sine Kerr (R) J.D. Mesnard and Cindy Hans
District 2 $426,301 Rosanna Gabaldon (D) Steve Kaiser and Jeanne Casteen
District 9 $420,938 Victoria Steele (D) Eva Burch and Robert Scantlebury

The officeholders above are listed for the current districts they hold. However, this is a redistricting year, so candidates have been identified below as incumbents even if they are running in a different district than they currently hold.

#1 District 7 – $3,283,583

Incumbent Wendy Rogers raised $3,234,404, Kyle Nitschke raised $49,180, and Jeff Daniels raised $0.

Wendy Rogers won with 63 percent of the vote, Kyle Nitschke received 37 percent of the vote, and Jeff Daniels received 0 percent of the vote.

#2 District 4 – $786,400

Incumbent Nancy K. Barto raised $390,158 and Incumbent Christine Marsh raised $396,242.

Christine Marsh won with 50 percent of the vote and Nancy K. Barto received 50 percent of the vote.

#3 District 13 – $444,591

Incumbent J.D. Mesnard raised $228,069 and Cindy Hans raised $216,522.

J.D. Mesnard won with 52 percent of the vote and Cindy Hans received 48 percent of the vote.

#4 District 2 – $426,301

Jeanne Casteen raised $246,783 and Steve Kaiser raised $179,518.

Steve Kaiser won with 52 percent of the vote and Jeanne Casteen received 48 percent of the vote.

#5 District 9 – $420,938

Eva Burch raised $305,724 and Robert Scantlebury raised $115,214.

Eva Burch won with 52 percent of the vote and Robert Scantlebury received 48 percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Arizona Republican candidates have spent $40 million more than Democrats

In Arizona, state-level candidates have spent $100 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 22, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $29.8 million and Republican candidates have spent $69.8 million. 

Arizona Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 150 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Arizona Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Katie Hobbs$12,534,035.99
2.Adrian Fontes$2,739,995.40
3.Kris Mayes$2,508,874.29
4.Marco Lopez$1,897,852.17
5.Aaron Lieberman$1,614,102.43
6.Reginald Bolding$576,913.73
7.Christine Marsh$374,208.09
8.Lauren Kuby$322,935.86
9.Sandra D Kennedy$299,568.06
10.Morgan Abraham$298,862.90

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

During the same time period, 176 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the California Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Karrin Taylor Robson$23,533,059.95
2.Kari Lake$8,637,260.82
3.Steve Gaynor$5,102,284.34
4.Rodney Glassman$4,391,347.95
5.Wendy Rogers$3,193,298.61
6.Abraham Hamadeh$2,966,091.53
7.Mark Finchem$2,010,661.60
8.Dawn Grove$1,911,687.27
9.Matt Salmon$1,776,371.05
10.Andrew W. Gould$1,574,667.43

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona candidate PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

StateReport NameDue Date
AZ20211/15/2022
AZ2022 Q14/15/2022
AZ2022 Q27/15/2022
AZ2022 Pre-Primary7/23/2022
AZ2022 Post-Primary and Q310/15/2022
AZ2022 Pre-General10/29/2022
AZ2022 Post-General and Q41/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



All candidates for Maricopa County Constable Kyrene precinct in Arizona complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Maricopa County Constable Kyrene precinct in Arizona — Bridget Bellavigna (D) and Daniel Diaz (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Constables are elected officials that issue orders of protection, summons, subpoenas, and writs of the court such as evictions and property seizures. There are 26 constables in Maricopa County that are elected by district to four-year terms.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Bellavigna:       

“I believe our Country should be run by the people, for the people. As Lincoln said, Government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the Earth. If we the people do not serve our Country we will be forever stuck with career politicians and our Country as we know it will perish. I strongly feel the calling to be of service to my community, and am a strong believer in the principle of “Service Before Self” I will do all I can to honor my oath and defend our democracy against all enemies both foreign and domestic. It is the oath I took over 40 years ago and one I took when I accepted the appointment for Kyrene Constable.”

Diaz:               

“Every person that lives in the Kyrene district should not be afraid for their safety. Phoenix crime rates are 61% higher than the national average and violent crimes are 106% higher than the national average (areavibes.com). Our city is not as safe as it used to be. The defunding of the police movement has left the Phoenix Police Department and others in our area demoralized and grossly understaffed. Regardless of your political views this should outrage all Arizonans. As a Police Officer I take pride in serving the community and making it safer.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Municipal elections in Maricopa County, Arizona, 2022



Campaign finance deadline today in Arizona

Candidates and organizations involved in Arizona’s statewide elections must file campaign finance information by October 29, 2022. The general election will take place in Arizona on November 8, 2022.

What state-level offices are on the ballot this year in Arizona?

Want to review the campaign finance data in Arizona so far? Click here to explore the data on Transparency USA.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.