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Stories about Arizona

Facebook was paid $123,154 from Arizona campaign accounts; other states reported millions

In Arizona, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $123,154 from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.19 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Arizona Secretary of State between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Arizona campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $123,154 spent with Facebook, 95.95 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$57,984.18Kari LakeCandidate PAC
2.$29,372.49Working ArizonaNon-Candidate PAC
3.$7,316.30Leo BiasiucciCandidate PAC
4.$6,154.38William PoundsCandidate PAC
5.$4,623.25Adrian FontesCandidate PAC
6.$3,572.71Aaron LiebermanCandidate PAC
7.$2,772.72Steve KaiserCandidate PAC
8.$2,509.26Jan DubauskasCandidate PAC
9.$2,268.94Steven BeaverCandidate PAC
10.$1,590.66Maricopa County Democratic PartyNon-Candidate PAC

Campaign Expenditures with Facebook in 12 states during the most recent election cycle

Here is how spending with Facebook in Arizona compares to 11 other states with data available from Transparency USA:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
20211/15/2022
2022 Q14/15/2022
2022 Q27/15/2022
2022 Pre-Primary7/23/2022
2022 Post-Primary and Q310/15/2022
2022 Pre-General10/29/2022
2022 Post-General and Q41/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Percentage of Arizona state legislative incumbents facing primaries at its highest since 2014

Twenty-eight of the 51 Arizona state legislators running for re-election this year—nine Democrats and 17 Republicans—face contested primaries. That equals 55% of incumbents seeking re-election, the highest rate since 2014. The remaining 45% of incumbents are not facing primary challengers.

Twenty-eight incumbents is, by itself, the largest number of incumbents in contested primaries since 2014. But it is also similar to recent cycles. The rate of incumbents in contested primaries is higher this year than 2018 and 2020 because fewer incumbents are seeking re-election.

Thirty-nine incumbents did not file for re-election, nine because of term limits. This is the largest number of retiring incumbents in Arizona since 2014.

In addition to the 39 retirements, four other seats are open this year because incumbents are running in different districts as a result of redistricting. When district lines are redrawn incumbents might find themselves living in new districts. This can result in incumbents challenging other incumbents in primary or general elections.

This year there are three primaries featuring multiple incumbents. In each of these races, at least one incumbent is guaranteed to lose:

Additionally, Sens. Christine Marsh (D) and Nancy Barto (R) were drawn into a contested general election in Senate District 4.

The filing deadline for candidates running for state legislative office in Arizona this year was April 4. Candidates filed to run for all of the state’s 60 House seats and 30 Senate seats.

Overall, 203 major party candidates filed to run this year: 91 Democrats and 112 Republicans. That equals 2.3 candidates per seat, up from 2.0 in 2020.

Arizona has been a Republican trifecta since 2008. Republicans currently hold a 16-14 majority in the Senate and a 31-29 majority in the House.

Arizona’s state legislative primaries are scheduled for Aug. 2, the tenth statewide state legislative primary date of the 2022 election cycle.

Additional reading:



Arizona Secretary of State raises $3.69 million this election cycle

According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Arizona Secretary of State’s office, Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs has raised $3.69 million and spent $2.19 million between Jan. 1, 2021 and Mar. 31, 2022. Hobbs is currently ranked third in state-level donations in the 2022 election cycle.

Hobbs is a member of the Democratic Party and assumed office in 2019. In Arizona, the secretary of State is an elected position. Duties vary by state but are generally administrative in nature and may include recordkeeping, certification of state documents, and serving as chief election official. Hobbs’ current term ends in 2023. She is running for Governor of Arizona in 2022.

Hobbs’ reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Hobbs

Of the $3,694,059 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 2.36 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Hobbs (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2021)

RankTotal AmountDonor Name Donor Type
1.$15,200.00Daryl KlingINDIVIDUAL
2.$15,000.00Lewis GuthrieINDIVIDUAL
3.$10,600.00United Food & Commercial Workers Union of AZ Local 99ENTITY
4.$10,500.00Donalyn MiklesINDIVIDUAL
5.$6,700.00Penelope M PestleINDIVIDUAL
6.$6,300.00Marleigh FletcherINDIVIDUAL
7.$6,189.57Internal Revenue ServiceENTITY
8.$5,700.00Richard B UsherINDIVIDUAL
9.$5,500.00Timothy ErnstINDIVIDUAL
10.$5,397.75Elizabeth CookINDIVIDUAL

Expenditures by Hobbs

On the expenditures side, Hobbs reported $2,192,498, with 6.20 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by Hobbs (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2021)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$639,300.00Authentic Campaigns IncENTITY
2.$128,340.34Alaina PembertonINDIVIDUAL
3.$114,289.49Internal Revenue Service FederalENTITY
4.$90,899.34Andrew MarkoffINDIVIDUAL
5.$71,926.94Vantiv EcommerceENTITY
6.$67,000.00The Money Wheel LLCENTITY
7.$64,837.33Saguaro Strategies LLCENTITY
8.$62,617.00Al Media LLCENTITY
9.$62,389.37Jenna RiveraINDIVIDUAL
10.$57,398.86Rosevely HuertaINDIVIDUAL

How donations to Hobbs compare to the same office in other states

Contributions vary widely among officeholders in the same role. A number of factors, including whether the position is appointed or elected, can influence donor activity. Here is how Hobbs compares to the 10 other state and commonwealth secretaries with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 27 secretaries of state are members of the Republican Party and 20 are members of the Democratic Party. Voters elect the secretary of state in 35 states, while they are appointed by either the governor or state legislature in the other 12. Alaska, Hawaii, and Utah do not have secretaries of state. In 2022, 27 states are holding elections for the position.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
20211/15/2022
2022 Q14/15/2022
2022 Q27/15/2022
2022 Pre-Primary7/23/2022
2022 Post-Primary and Q310/15/2022
2022 Pre-General10/29/2022
2022 Post-General and Q41/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Here are the top 10 places Arizona candidates and PACs are spending campaign money

In Arizona politics, state-level candidates and PACs spent $63.7 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022. More than $20.1 million or 31.6 percent of all campaign finance expenditures went to the 10 payees at the top of the list. 

A payee is an entity or individual who has received money from a campaign account. Candidates and PACs must report campaign expenditures, including payments to vendors, donations to other campaign accounts, and bank transfers, to the Arizona Secretary of State.

Top 10 Arizona payees (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

Here are the top 10 recipients of Arizona campaign money in the 2022 election cycle, as of the most recent reports. 

RankPayee Name Total Received
1.Fieldworks LLC$9,876,130.68
2.Mentzer Media Services Inc$4,254,240.22
3.Future Now Fund Federal$1,547,087.66
4.Advanced Micro Targeting$1,070,000.00
5.Targeted Victory$671,810.76
6.Authentic Campaigns Inc$639,300.00
7.Go Right Strategies Inc$633,185.34
8.Torres Law Group PLLC$615,267.28
9.Coppersmith Brockelman PLC$434,332.63
10.FP1 Strategies$400,313.93

Total Expenditures in nine states during the 2022 election cycle

Campaign finance expenditures vary widely among state-level candidates and PACs,. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how expenditure activity varies across states. Here is how total campaign finance expenditures in Arizona compared to eight other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total expenditures, by state

RankStateTotal ExpendituresReporting Period
1Texas$337,432,3511/1/2022 – 2/19/2022
2Pennsylvania$319,374,3891/1/2022 – 3/9/2022
3Florida$302,254,1341/1/2022 – 2/28/2022
4Michigan$71,971,7871/1/2022 – 4/20/2022
5Arizona63,716,6171/1/2022 – 3/31/2022
6Ohio$59,240,3971/1/2022 – 4/13/2022
7Wisconsin$34,706,0221/1/2022 – 3/21/2022
8Indiana$32,159,3981/1/2022 – 4/8/2022
9North Carolina$22,543,0371/1/2022 – 12/31/2021

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
20211/15/2022
2022 Q14/15/2022
2022 Q27/15/2022
2022 Pre-Primary7/23/2022
2022 Post-Primary and Q310/15/2022
2022 Pre-General10/29/2022
2022 Post-General and Q41/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



The top 10 Arizona candidates raised 28.2% of all donations

Editor’s note: A previous version of this article did not include attorney general candidate Rodney Glassman.

In Arizona politics, state-level candidates and PACs raised $100.5 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022. More than $28.3 million or 28.2 percent of all donations was raised by the 10 individuals at the top of the list. 

Top 10 Arizona candidates (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

Here are the 10 Arizona candidates who have raised the most money so far in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Arizona Secretary of State. 

RankCandidate Name Total DonationsTotal Expenditures
1.Karrin Taylor Robson$6,504,312.54$6,144,176.38
2.Steve Gaynor$5,044,429.34$935,874.25
3.Katie Hobbs$3,694,059.07$2,192,497.66
4.Wendy Rogers$2,824,215.36$1,055,981.38
5.Kari Lake$2,432,479.81$1,723,172.60
6.Rodney Glassman$1,802,513.99$320,242.16
7.Matt Salmon$1,700,481.88$989,764.95
8.Marco Lopez$1,546,767.19$1,097,213.50
9.Aaron Lieberman$1,481,970.11$675,241.30
10.Abraham Hamadeh$1,267,153.40$186,830.55

Donations to top candidates in 10 states during the 2022 election cycle

Among state-level candidates and officeholders, fundraising varies widely. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how donor activity varies across states. Here is how donations to the top 10 Arizona candidates compare to nine other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of donations to top 10 candidates, by state

RankStateDonations to Top 10 CandidatesTotal DonationsReporting Period
1.Florida$110,704,048.67$532,230,957.551/1/2021 – 2/28/2022
2.Texas$105,345,995.42$375,309,268.771/1/2021 – 2/19/2022
3.Pennsylvania$34,501,470.61$343,783,026.521/1/2021 – 3/09/2022
4.Michigan$25,358,422.95$89,192,492.111/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
5.Arizona$28,298,382.69$100,534,917.071/1/2021 – 12/31/2022
6.Ohio$20,559,510.69$64,199,578.371/1/2021 – 3/31/2021
7.Wisconsin$19,907,524.3755,603,885.141/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
8.North Carolina$8,927,365.01$39,859,339.461/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
9.Indiana$7,661,472.0249,459,363.581/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
10.Minnesota$5,201,704.60$36,935,152.761/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

In some states, officeholders may accept donations to their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Any reported donations by those officeholders are included in candidate donation numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona candidate PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
20211/15/2022
2022 Q14/15/2022
2022 Q27/15/2022
2022 Pre-Primary7/23/2022
2022 Post-Primary and Q310/15/2022
2022 Pre-General10/29/2022
2022 Post-General and Q41/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Arizona Supreme Court rules against veto referendum to challenge state income law

Voters in Arizona will not vote on a veto referendum to repeal a new income tax law this November.

Last week, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled against a veto referendum that challenged two sections of an omnibus appropriations bill signed by Gov. Doug Ducey (R) in June 2021. The sections (13 and 15 of Senate Bill 1828) would reduce Arizona’s state income tax from four brackets to two brackets, and reduce the brackets to a flat rate of 2.50% when state revenue exceeds $12.976 billion.

In Arizona, income of $26,500 or less is taxed at 2.59%, while income of $159,001 or more is taxed at 4.50% (brackets for those paying jointly are double these dollar amounts). Sections 13 and 15 would change the four brackets to two brackets of 2.55% and 2.98%.

The citizens behind the campaign for the veto referendum, Invest In Arizona, sought to bring the issue to the ballot. The Arizona Education Association and Stand for Children both backed the campaign, expressing concerns with how a flat tax rate will impact funding for Arizona’s schools. Invest In Arizona filed the veto referendum in July of 2021, shortly after SB1828 was signed into law.

The Arizona Free Enterprise Club challenged the veto referendum as unconstitutional, stating that the Arizona Constitution prohibited veto referendums against bills that provide for support and maintenance of state government. Lawyers for Invest in Arizona argued that the flat tax portion of SB1828 does not fall into that category because it would lead to less revenue for the state government.

Meanwhile, the Invest in Arizona PAC raised $5.29 million and filed more than 215,000 signatures. In November of 2021, Secretary of State Katie Hobbs announced that there were enough signatures collected for the measure to appear on the ballot in 2022.

The issue was brought to the Maricopa County Superior Court, and in December 2021, Judge Katherine Cooper ruled against the Arizona Free Enterprise Club, ruling that Arizona voters have the right to decide on the referendum. The judge stated that while there is no right to refer tax increases to the ballot, this referendum did not fall into category because, if successful, it would leave the state with more revenue.

This decision was appealed, and was brought to the Arizona Supreme Court. On April 21, 2022, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Arizona Free Enterprise Club, ordering that the veto referendum be removed from the ballot. The court concurred that Section 13 and 15 of SB1828 do fall under the “support and maintenance” criteria of the Arizona Constitution, and that this measure cannot be brought before voters on the ballot.

Scot Mussi, the president of Arizona Free Enterprise Club, stated that the ruling was a “big win for taxpayers in our state”. David Lujan, executive director and CEO of the Arizona Children’s Action Alliance, argued that the flat tax would devastate Arizona’s future, and that it takes away voices of voters. Recently, the Arizona Supreme Court also struck down Proposition 208, a voter-approved measure that enacted a 3.50% income tax for income above $250,000 to fund K-12 schools.

Currently, there are four measures that are certified to be on the ballot in Arizona.

Additional reading:



Invest in Arizona outraises every other Arizona PAC with $5.16 million

In Arizona, Invest in Arizona (sponsored by AEA and Stand for Children) has raised more than any other non-candidate political action committee (PAC) in the 2022 election cycle so far. According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Arizona Secretary of State, Invest in Arizona raised $5.16 million and spent $5.23 million between Jan. 1, 2021 and Dec. 1, 2021. 

In Arizona politics, donations to Invest in Arizona represent 12.33 percent of the $41.85 million all Arizona state-level PACs have raised in total. Here are Invest in Arizona’s top donors and recipients, as reported to the Arizona Secretary of State.

Donations to Invest in Arizona

Of the $5,162,152 raised in the 2022 election cycle, 99.70 percent came from Invest in Arizona’s top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Invest in Arizona (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$2,491,494.26Stand for Children Arizona IecEntity
2.$2,408,221.00National Education Association FederalEntity
3.$127,000.00Aea Fund for Public Education (Formerly) AZ PAC (AZ Education Assn PAC)Entity
4.$63,500.00Arizona Interfaith NetworkEntity
5.$48,591.11Screen Strategies MediaEntity
6.$2,000.00Children’s Action AllianceEntity
7.$2,000.00Elizabeth GoffIndividual
8.$1,000.00Andrew HoganIndividual
9.$1,000.00David NixIndividual
10.$1,000.00Edward GoffIndividual

Expenditures by Invest in Arizona

On the expenditures side, Invest in Arizona reported $5,225,053, with 99.04 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping the list. Payees include both contribution recipients and vendors, as filed by Invest in Arizona.

Top Invest in Arizona Payees (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$3,968,328.23Fieldworks LLCEntity
2.$378,611.57Coppersmith Brockelman PLCEntity
3.$213,494.51Looks Good Printing & Sign ServicesEntity
4.$202,988.26Stand for Children Arizona IecEntity
5.$115,000.00Save Our Schools Arizona PACEntity
6.$78,000.00Valley Interfaith ProjectEntity
7.$75,500.00Fieldcorps LLCEntity
8.$65,000.00La Machine Field OperationsEntity
9.$48,083.00Lake Research Partners IncEntity
10.$30,000.00National Education Association FederalEntity

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
20211/15/2022
2022 Q14/15/2022
2022 Q27/15/2022
2022 Pre-Primary7/23/2022
2022 Post-Primary and Q310/15/2022
2022 Pre-General10/29/2022
2022 Post-General and Q41/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Arizona Speaker Bowers raises $20,400 this election cycle

According to the most recent campaign finance reports made to the Arizona Secretary of State, Arizona House Speaker Russell Bowers has raised $20,400 and spent $2,552 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Dec. 31, 2021. 

The speaker of the Arizona House is the leader of the state’s lower chamber. Rep. Bowers is a member of the Republican Party and has served as a state representative since 2015. His current term ends in 2022.

Rep. Bowers’ reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2021)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Rep. Bowers

Of the $20,400 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 41.7 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Bowers (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankDonor Name Total AmountType
1.$1,000.00Adam HawkinsIndividual
2.$1,000.00Cigna Corporation Employee PACEntity
3.$1,000.00The Home Depot Inc PACEntity
4.$1,000.00Jeff SandquistIndividual
5.$1,000.00Jessica BasingerIndividual
6.$1,000.00Jessica PachecoIndividual
7.$1,000.00Wendy BriggsIndividual
8.$500.00AZ Acre PAC (Action Committee for Rural Electrification)Entity
9.$500.00Arizona Lodging and Tourism PACEntity
10.$500.00Associations Inc PAC/associa PACEntity

Expenditures by Rep. Bowers

On the expenditures side, Bowers reported $2,552, with 100 percent of all spending going to the four payees on the list. 

Top Expenditures by Bowers (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankPayee Name Total AmountType
1.$2,026.20Max SkabelundIndividual
2.$245.80Pay PalEntity
3.$204.12VerizonEntity
4.$75.43First Watch CafeEntity

How Rep. Bowers’s fundraising compares to other state speakers

Among members of the state legislature, fundraising varies widely. A number of factors, including whether an incumbent officeholder is running for re-election, influence donor activity. Here is how fundraising by Bowers compares to the nine other state speakers with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Fundraising reported by 10 state speakers in the 2022 election cycle

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
20211/15/2022
2022 Q14/15/2022
2022 Q27/15/2022
2022 Pre-Primary7/23/2022
2022 Post-Primary and Q310/15/2022
2022 Pre-General10/29/2022
2022 Post-General and Q41/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These PACs are the best fundraisers in Arizona

In Arizona politics, non-candidate political action committees (PACs) have received $41.9 million in total donations between January 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021. The top 10 PACs raised more than $23.2 million, or 55 percent of all donations made to state-level PACs.

These are the top 10 PACs in Arizona state-level politics in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State:

Top 10 Arizona PACs (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankDonor NameTotal Donations
1Invest in Arizona (Sponsored by Aea and Stand for Children)$5,162,152
2Arizonans Fed up with Failing Healthcare (Healthcare Rising AZ)$4,050,084
3Seiu United Healthcare Workers West Political Issues Committee$3,470,000
4The PAC for America’s Future – AZ$3,008,591
5Working Arizona$2,178,863
6Arizona Democratic Party$1,427,027
7Arizona Pipe Trades 469$1,081,612
8Realtors of AZ PAC (Rapac)$960,914
9Southwest Regional Council of Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee$942,128
10Voters’ Right to Know$903,600

A PAC is broadly defined as a group that spends money on elections. They may be established and administered by corporations, labor unions, membership organizations, or trade associations.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
20211/15/2022
2022 Q14/15/2022
2022 Q27/15/2022
2022 Pre-Primary7/23/2022
2022 Post-Primary and Q310/15/2022
2022 Pre-General10/29/2022
2022 Post-General and Q41/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



SCOTUS accepts three new cases for its 2022-2023 term

The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) accepted three cases on March 28 for argument during its October 2022-2023 term. To date, the court has agreed to hear arguments in nine cases next term.

National Pork Producers Council v. Ross concerns the constitutionality of the conditions California’s Proposition 12 imposes on pork producers nationwide in order to sell pork in the state. The questions presented to the court are: “1. Whether allegations that a state law has dramatic economic effects largely outside of the state and requires pervasive changes to an integrated nationwide industry state a violation of the dormant Commerce Clause, or whether the extraterritoriality principle described in this Court’s decisions is now a dead letter. 2. Whether such allegations, concerning a law that is based solely on preferences regarding out-of-state housing of farm animals, state a Pike claim.” The case originated from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit.

Cruz v. Arizona concerns the proper application of U.S. Supreme Court precedent during state capital cases’ sentencing and appellate review. The court was asked to consider the following question: “Whether the Arizona Supreme Court’s holding that Arizona Rule of Criminal Procedure 32.1(g) precluded post-conviction relief is an adequate and independent state-law ground for the judgment.” The case came to the court from the Arizona Supreme Court.

Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. v. Goldsmith concerns the definition of a transformative work for purposes of the fair use defense under federal copyright law. The question presented in the case asks: “What does it mean for a work of art to be “transformative” as a matter of law under the Copyright Act?” The case originated from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit.

The court will begin hearing cases for its 2022-2023 term on Oct. 3, 2022.

Additional reading: