TagCampaign Finance 2022

These five Indiana Senate candidates raised the most money and lost their primary

Most money raised by a losing primary candidate

General elections for 25 of 50 seats in the Indiana State Senate will take place on November 8, 2022. State senatorial primary elections were held on May 3, 2022. Republicans hold a 39-11 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates in each party who raised the most money and lost their primary election. In the 2022 election cycle, eight of 25 Republican primaries and four of 13 Democratic primaries were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the primary winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

Top fundraisers with unsuccessful primary campaigns this cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Indiana Secretary of State covering the period of January 1, 2021, through April 8, 2022.

The Democratic candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary were:

  • Todd Connor – $155,026 – District 4 (Lost primary 27% – 44%)
  • Kristin Jones – $117,570 – District 46 (Lost primary 26% – 44%)
  • Ashley Eason – $48,108 – District 46 (Lost primary 16% – 44%)
  • Karla Lopez Owens – $21,647 – District 46 (Lost primary 14% – 44%)
  • Deb Chubb – $17,811 – District 4 (Lost primary 22% – 44%)

The Republican candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary were:

  • Ron Turpin – $477,862 – District 14 (Lost primary 40% – 50%)
  • Christian Beaver – $47,653 – District 23 (Lost primary 19% – 31%)
  • Gary Byrne – $28,331 – District 47 (Lost primary 48% – 52%)
  • Evan McMullen – $12,129 – District 25 (Lost primary 44% – 56%)
  • Bill Webster – $11,099 – District 23 (Lost primary 27% – 31%)

Top fundraisers with unsuccessful primary campaigns last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Indiana Secretary of State covering the period of January 1, 2019, through December 31, 2020.

The Democratic candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary in 2020 were:

  • John Zody – $49,718 – District 40 (Lost primary 17% – 81%)
  • Alex Bowman – $13,607 – District 10 (Lost primary 36% – 64%)
  • Jason Fletcher – $9,446 – District 36 (Lost primary 27% – 73%)
  • Tim Barr – $0 – District 16 (Lost primary 48% – 52%)
  • Trent Feuerbach – $0 – District 40 (Lost primary 2% – 81%)

The Republican candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary in 2020 were:

  • John Gaylor – $564,955 – District 20 (Lost primary 32% – 68%)
  • Jeffrey Wible – $24,735 – District 13 (Lost primary 39% – 61%)
  • Ethan Brown – $0 – District 7 (Lost primary 26% – 69%)
  • Terry Michael – $0 – District 30 (Lost primary 19% – 81%)
  • Tom Rhoades – $0 – District 16 (Lost primary 31% – 69%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/19/2022
2022 Statewide Quarterly/Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-Election 10/17/2022
2022 Statewide Quarterly 11/1/2022
2022 Annual Report 1/18/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These five Indiana House candidates raised the most money and lost their primary

General elections for all 100 seats in the Indiana House of Representatives will take place on November 8, 2022. State house primary elections were held on May 3, 2022. Republicans hold a 71-29 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates in each party who raised the most money and lost their primary election. In the 2022 election cycle, 41 of 85 Republican primaries and five of 57 Democratic primaries were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the primary winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

Top fundraisers with unsuccessful primary campaigns this cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Indiana Secretary of State covering the period of January 1, 2021, through April 8, 2022.

The Democratic candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary were:

  • Melissa Rinehart – $12,720 – District 82 (Lost primary 36% – 49%)
  • Brad Swain – $2,477 – District 62 (Lost primary 32% – 68%)
  • Kathy Zoucha – $1,194 – District 82 (Lost primary 15% – 49%)
  • Jestin Coler – $330 – District 51 (Lost primary 32% – 68%)
  • Craig Hirsty – $168 – District 88 (Lost primary 11% – 89%)

The Republican candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary were:

  • Daniel Leonard – $246,415 – District 50 (Lost primary 43% – 57%)
  • Matthew Whetstone – $148,551 – District 25 (Lost primary 26% – 39%)
  • Bryan Washburn – $64,633 – District 16 (Lost primary 33% – 49%)
  • Curt Nisly – $58,737 – District 22 (Lost primary 27% – 73%)
  • Bob Carmony – $50,496 – District 73 (Lost primary 33% – 57%)

Top fundraisers with unsuccessful primary campaigns last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Indiana Secretary of State covering the period of January 1, 2019, through December 31, 2020.

The Democratic candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary in 2020 were:

  • Garrett Blad – $61,145 – District 6 (Lost primary 40% – 45%)
  • Anthony Higgs – $22,488 – District 1 (Lost primary 27% – 73%)
  • Mark Hinton – $14,600 – District 39 (Lost primary 30% – 70%)
  • Drew Duncan – $11,263 – District 6 (Lost primary 16% – 45%)
  • Cynthia Wirth – $10,285 – District 59 (Lost primary 45% – 55%)

The Republican candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary in 2020 were:

  • Leah McGrath – $153,400 – District 88 (Lost primary 43% – 57%)
  • Dollyne Sherman – $97,789 – District 93 (Lost primary 49% – 51%)
  • John Stoffel – $75,646 – District 50 (Lost primary 46% – 54%)
  • Bill Dixon – $41,300 – District 22 (Lost primary 41% – 59%)
  • J. David Hopper – $30,219 – District 58 (Lost primary 13% – 43%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/19/2022
2022 Statewide Quarterly/Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-Election 10/17/2022
2022 Statewide Quarterly 11/1/2022
2022 Annual Report 1/18/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $166,072 from Minnesota campaign accounts; other states reported millions

In Minnesota, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $166,072 from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.4 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Minnesota campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $166,072 spent with Facebook, 98.67 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$113,572.13Dr Jensen ScottCandidate PAC
2.$35,440.79Dennis SmithCandidate PAC
3.$4,435.35Seiu Minn State Council Political FundNon-candidate PAC
4.$3,096.34Kim CrockettCandidate PAC
5.$2,500.00Karin HousleyCandidate PAC
6.$1,765.74DFL House CaucusNon-candidate PAC
7.$907.75Thomas C FunkCandidate PAC
8.$825.00Minnesota Young Republicans Victory FundNon-candidate PAC
9.$819.53Jessica IntermillCandidate PAC
10.$500.00Climate Vote MinnesotaNon-candidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Here is how spending with Facebook in Minnesota compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
2022 Q14/14/2022
2022 Q26/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
2022 Q39/27/2022
2022 Q410/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $194,180 from Michigan campaign accounts; other states reported millions

In Michigan, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $194,180 from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.27 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Michigan Secretary of State between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 20, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Michigan campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $194,180 spent with Facebook, 92.58 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$65,000.00Michigan ActionNon-candidate PAC
2.$39,618.50Let MI Kids LearnNon-candidate PAC
3.$33,000.00Get Michigan Working Again (Superpac)Non-candidate PAC
4.$16,084.86For Our Future Michigan (Superpac)Non-candidate PAC
5.$6,541.65Mark HuizengaCandidate PAC
6.$5,785.19Steven GilbertCandidate PAC
7.$4,960.00Great Lakes Education ProjectNon-candidate PAC
8.$3,880.10Lana TheisCandidate PAC
9.$3,058.53Livingston County Republican CommitteeNon-candidate PAC
10.$1,849.54Northwest Wayne County State-Local PACNon-candidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Here is how spending with Facebook in Michigan compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022

*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
2022 Pre-General10/28/2023
2022 Post-General12/8/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $2.68 million from Texas campaign accounts

In Texas, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $2.68 million from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.59 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Texas Ethics Commission between Jan. 1, 2021, and [most recent date], here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Texas campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $2,675,276 spent with Facebook, 83.11 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 2/19/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$1,101,595.06Donald HuffinesCandidate PAC
2.$359,631.61Eva GuzmanCandidate PAC
3.$300,000.00Evan YoungCandidate PAC
4.$210,117.29Save Austin Now PACNon-candidate PAC
5.$76,931.37Boot Texas RepublicansNon-candidate PAC
6.$43,268.17Tan Parker IVCandidate PAC
7.$42,365.71Raul Reyes Jr.Candidate PAC
8.$39,530.99Matt RostamiCandidate PAC
9.$25,220.15Charter Schools Now PACNon-candidate PAC
10.$24,654.75Texas Organizing Project Political Action CommitteeNon-candidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Here is how spending with Facebook in Texas compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $78,960 from North Carolina campaign accounts; other states reported millions

In North Carolina, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $78,960 from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.18 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the North Carolina State Board of Elections between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 30, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 North Carolina campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $78,960 spent with Facebook, 48.5 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 4/30/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$9,954.00Carolina FederationNon-candidate PAC
2.$7,077.14Jim PerryCandidate PAC
3.$4,000.00ColorofchangeNon-candidate PAC
4.$3,200.00Durham for AllNon-candidate PAC
5.$2,900.80Angie SpillmanCandidate PAC
6.$2,734.06George McClellanCandidate PAC
7.$2,213.94Chad HawkinsCandidate PAC
8.$2,105.89Harper PetersonCandidate PAC
9.$2,074.56Graig R MeyerCandidate PAC
10.$2,035.00Beth StockwellCandidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Here is how spending with Facebook in North Carolina compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Semiannual1/28/2022
2022 Q1 Plus5/10/2022
2022 Semiannual (only candidates not on 2022 ballot)7/29/2022
2022 Q3 Plus10/31/2022
2022 Q41/11/2023
2022 Year End Semiannual (only candidates not on 2022 ballot)1/27/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $101,978 from Wisconsin campaign accounts; other states reported millions

In Wisconsin, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $101,978 from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.29 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 21, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Wisconsin campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $101,978 spent with Facebook, 87.47 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$37,500.00Demand Justice PACNon-candidate PAC
2.$18,500.00Planned Parenthood Advocates of Wisconsin Political FundNon-candidate PAC
3.$12,485.95Jonathan WichmannCandidate PAC
4.$8,506.52Waukesha County Democratic PartyNon-candidate PAC
5.$2,482.93Karl JaegerCandidate PAC
6.$2,360.42Francesca HongCandidate PAC
7.$2,153.57David VarnamCandidate PAC
8.$1,869.89Wisconsin Conservation Voters Independent Expenditure CommitteeNon-candidate PAC
9.$1,736.77Mark SchefflerCandidate PAC
10.$1,600.00Wisconsin Muslim Civic Alliance IncNon-candidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Here is how spending with Facebook in Wisconsin compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $19,924 from Ohio campaign accounts; other states reported millions

In Ohio, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $19,924 from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.03 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Ohio Secretary of State between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 13, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Ohio campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $19,924 spent with Facebook, 90.95 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$9,505.17Joe BlystoneCandidate PAC
2.$2,864.63Casey WeinsteinCandidate PAC
3.$2,249.82Phillip RobinsonCandidate PAC
4.$866.91The MatriotsNon-candidate PAC
5.$594.61Christian JohnsonCandidate PAC
6.$532.83Juanita BrentCandidate PAC
7.$458.88Gary ClickCandidate PAC
8.$378.03Theresa GavaroneCandidate PAC
9.$350.00Pickaway County Patriot AllianceNon-candidate PAC
10.$319.14Summit County Democratic Party Executive Committee Restricted FundNon-candidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Campaign expenditures vary widely. Here is how spending with Facebook in Ohio compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $5.29 million from California campaign accounts

In California, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $5.29 million from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.5 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the California Secretary of State between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 23, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 California campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $5,290,745 spent with Facebook, 75.07 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 4/23/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$1,659,746.07Stop the Republican Recall of Governor NewsomNon-candidate PAC
2.$538,601.24Kevin KileyCandidate PAC
3.$472,888.31Larry ElderCandidate PAC
4.$255,000.00Committee to Protect California Kids Sponsored by Nonprofit Health OrganizationsNon-candidate PAC
5.$232,500.00Rescue CaliforniaNon-candidate PAC
6.$225,000.00Jenny Rae Le RouxCandidate PAC
7.$202,739.38Californians for Solutions to Homelessness and Mental Health Support a Coalition of Housing and Mental Health Experts, Concerned Taxpayers, and Digital Sports Entertainment and Gaming CompaniesNon-candidate PAC
8.$150,000.00Rescue California-to Support the Recall of Gavin NewsomNon-candidate PAC
9.$142,785.93Reform CaliforniaNon-candidate PAC
10.$92,757.71Voto Latino Against the Newsom Recall (Nonprofit 501(c)(4))Non-candidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Here is how spending with Facebook in California compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active California PACs submitted to the California Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameDue Date
Semiannual1/31/2022
1st Pre-Election – Primary4/28/2022
2nd Pre-Election – Primary5/26/2022
Semiannual8/1/2022
1st Pre-Election – General9/29/2022
2nd Pre- Election – General10/27/2022
Semiannual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $4.49 million from Virginia campaign accounts

In Virginia, state-level candidates and PACs spent $4.49 million from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2021 election cycle. Facebook received 1.06 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Virginia Department of Elections between Jan. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2021, here are the top candidates and PACs that spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Virginia campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $4,486,863 spent with Facebook, 90.36 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2020 – 12/31/2021)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$3,736,097.89Terry McAuliffeCandidate PAC
2.$100,473.28Vote Yes Richmond Wins!Non-candidate PAC
3.$39,889.76Vote Yes PortsmouthNon-candidate PAC
4.$31,106.28Tim AndersonCandidate PAC
5.$30,445.30Jennifer KitchenCandidate PAC
6.$29,884.39Stephen E HeretickCandidate PAC
7.$23,744.35Dawn AdamsCandidate PAC
8.$22,491.16Vote Yes for BristolNon-candidate PAC
9.$20,585.91Jennifer Carroll FoyCandidate PAC
10.$19,567.46Kathy ByronCandidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Here is how spending with Facebook in Virginia compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Virginia PACs submitted to the Virginia Department of Elections. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/15/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/15/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.