Tagcampaign finance reports

Republican and Democrat national party committees raised $467 million between October 15 and November 23

Six party committees raised a combined $467 million between October 15 and November 23 this year, according to post-general election campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on December 3. One more campaign finance report is due this cycle, covering fundraising and spending through December 31.

Democrats and Republicans each have three party committees; a national committee to coordinate overall party objectives and one committee each dedicated to electing members to the Senate and House. The latter two are referred to as Hill committees. During the 2018 campaign cycle, the six committees spent a combined $1.3 billion. So far in the 2020 cycle, they have spent a combined $2.37 billion out of $2.49 billion in fundraising.

The Republican National Committee (RNC) raised $202.5 million and spent $217.3 million during the five-and-a-half-week reporting period, while the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised $61.0 million and spent $113.8 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 59.9% more than the DNC ($845.2 million to $455.4 million). The RNC’s 59.9% advantage is up from 47.9% as of the pre-general campaign finance reports and 51.5% at the end of September.

At this point in the 2016 election cycle (the most recent presidential cycle), the DNC had a 7.2% fundraising advantage over the RNC ($351.9 million to $327.2 million).

The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $75.5 million and spent $57.1 million during the reporting period, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $35.6 million and spent $49.9 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 5.3% more than the DSCC ($295.2 million to $279.9 million). The NRSC’s 5.3% fundraising advantage is up from a 10.6% fundraising advantage for the DSCC as of the pre-general election campaign finance reports and a 4.2% advantage for the DSCC as of the end of September.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $48.0 million and spent $51.0 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $44.8 million and spent $57.8 million. So far in the 2020 campaign cycle, the DCCC has raised 22.3% more than the NRCC ($338.6 million to $270.5 million). The DCCC’s 22.3% fundraising advantage is down from 25.1% as of the pre-general election reports and 26.1% as of the end of September.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Republicans had a narrower lead in Senate fundraising and Democrats had a wider lead in House fundraising. The NRSC had raised 1.5% more than the DSCC ($148.8 million to $146.7 million), while the DCCC had raised 35.8% more than the NRCC ($291.3 million to $202.8 million).

So far in the 2020 campaign cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 27.1% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($1.411 billion to $1.074 billion). Republicans’ 27.1% fundraising advantage is up from 15.7% as of the pre-general election reports and 18.7% as of the end of September.

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California ballot measures top $700 million in contributions

In California, campaigns have raised more than $694 million through October 17 to support or oppose statewide ballot measures on the November 3 ballot. An additional $13 million was raised for Proposition 13, which was defeated on March 3, bringing the total for the year to $708 million. In 2018, campaigns for and against 16 measures raised $369 million in California for the entire election cycle.

Of the 12 measures on the November ballot, contributions to the campaigns surrounding four of the measures—Propositions 15, 21, 22, and 23—account for 80 percent of the total contributions. Proposition 22, which would define app-based drivers as independent contractors, accounts for 30 percent of this year’s total.

Proposition 22, at $218 million between supporters and opponents, is also the most expensive ballot measure election in California history. The difference in the amount raised by supporters and opponents is 10-to-1. Yes on 22, backed by Uber, Lyft, Doordash, and Instacart, received $199 million. No on 22 received $19 million, with labor unions and organizations as the five largest donors. 

Proposition 15, at $124 million, is the second most expensive ballot measure election in California this year. Proposition 15 would require commercial and industrial properties, except those zoned as commercial agriculture, to be taxed based on their market value, rather than their purchase price.

Yes on 15 raised $63 million, with a $17-million contribution from the California Teachers Association and a $12-million contribution from Chan Zuckerberg Advocacy. Chan Zuckerberg Advocacy also contributed $2 million to oppose California Proposition 20 and $500,000 to support Oregon Measure 110.

No on Prop 15 raised $61 million, with more than half coming from the California Business Roundtable. The California Business Roundtable was also active in opposing Proposition 21, contributing $6.2 million.

Proposition 21 would allow local governments to enact rent control on housing that was first occupied over 15 years ago, with an exception for landlords who own no more than two homes with distinct titles or subdivided interests. Proposition 21 is similar to 2018’s Proposition 10, which would have allowed local governments to enact rent control without specified limits. The campaigns surrounding Proposition 21 and Proposition 10 involve several of the same organizations. Yes on 21 received $40 million, with the AIDS Healthcare Foundation providing 99 percent of the total. No on 21 received $73 million, including $12 million from Essex Property Trust and $11 million from Equity Residential.

Proposition 23 is also similar to a ballot measure that was defeated in 2018 and involves several of the same supporters and opponents. Proposition 23 would require chronic dialysis clinics to: have an on-site physician while patients are being treated; report data on dialysis-related infections; obtain consent from the state health department before closing a clinic; and not discriminate against patients based on the source of payment for care. Yes on 23 received $9 million, which came from the SEIU-UHW West, a labor union that represents healthcare workers. No on 23 received $105 million—12 times the amount that supporters received. DaVita and Fresenius Medical Care, which are both dialysis companies, contributed $67 million and $30 million, respectively.

Across the 12 ballot propositions, three individuals were top donors to several measures related to criminal justice, affirmative action, and voting policies. Connie and Steve Ballmer, the former CEO of Microsoft, contributed a combined $6 million to Yes on 25, which seeks to replace cash bail with risk assessments in California, and $1 million to Yes on 16, which is campaigning to repeal a 1996 state constitutional amendment that prohibited race-based and sex-based affirmative action in public employment, education, and contracting.

Patty Quillin, whose spouse is Netflix CEO Reed Hastings, donated $1 million to Yes on 25 and $1 million to Yes on 16. Quillin donated $2 million to No on 20, which opposes a ballot measure to add crimes to the list of violent felonies for which early parole is restricted; recategorize certain types of theft and fraud crimes as wobblers (chargeable as misdemeanors or felonies); and require DNA collection for certain misdemeanors.

Quillin also contributed $250,000 to Yes on 17, which supports an amendment to allow people on parole for felony convictions to vote, and $250,000 to Yes on 18, which supports a constitutional amendment to allow 17-year-olds who will be 18 at the time of the next general election to vote in primary elections and special elections.

Across the U.S., more than $1 billion has been raised for 129 statewide ballot measures—120 of which are on the November 3 ballot—so far. After California, the state with the most ballot measure campaign finance activity is Illinois, which only has one measure on the ballot.

In Illinois, more than $110 million has been raised for and against a constitutional amendment to allow for a graduated income tax. Massachusetts and Colorado rank third and fourth. Ballotpedia will track ballot measure contributions and expenditures made through the remainder of the election cycle, which ends on December 31, 2021.

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33 committees supporting and opposing Colorado’s 11 November ballot measures have raised over $48 million, spent over $45 million

Eleven statewide ballot measures are certified to appear on the November 3 ballot in Colorado. Ballotpedia identified 33 committees supporting and opposing the 11 measures. The 33 committees had raised $48,172,175.15 and had spent $45,061,423.96 according to reports due on October 19 that covered information through October 14 as well as major contributor reports available as of October 20. The next regular reports are due on November 2.

Eight of the 11 measures on the ballot were placed on the ballot through citizen petition drives and concern wolf reintroduction, abortion restrictions, citizenship requirements for voting, national popular vote, paid medical leave, gambling, and taxes. The legislature referred the others to the ballot.

The measure with the highest amount of contributions is Proposition EE, where committees supporting the measure had raised $4.3 million and the committee opposing the measure had raised $3.77 million. Proposition EE, which was referred to the ballot by the state legislature, would increase taxes on tobacco, create a tax on nicotine and vaping products, and dedicate the revenue to health and education programs.

The other top most expensive measure in Colorado in 2020 are:

  1. Colorado Proposition 115, 22-Week Abortion Ban Initiative (2020) – Support: $536,767.90; Opposition: $6,995,891.62
  2. Colorado Proposition 118, Paid Medical and Family Leave Initiative (2020) – Support: $7,203,854.56; Opposition: $705,598.29
  3. Colorado Proposition 113, National Popular Vote Interstate Compact Referendum (2020) – Support: $4,664,373.10; Opposition: $1,603,884.33

So far in 2020, Ballotpedia has tracked $918.4 million in contributions to committees supporting or opposing the 129 statewide measures in 2020. Contribution totals increase rapidly in October due to pre-election campaign finance reports. Colorado currently ranks #4 among states with the highest ballot measure campaign contributions, behind California ($547.5 million), Illinois ($110.4 million), and Massachusetts ($55.2 million).

In 2018, Ballotpedia tracked $1.185 billion in contributions to the ballot measure campaigns supporting and opposing the 167 certified 2018 measures. Campaigns supporting and opposing the 13 statewide ballot measures on the 2018 ballot in Colorado raised $70.4 million, ranking Colorado #6 among states with the highest ballot measure campaign contributions in 2018. California was #1 with $369 million.

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Biden raises $281 million, Trump raises $81 million in September

Former Vice President Joe Biden (D) outraised President Donald Trump (R) by $200 million, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on Tuesday.

The Biden campaign raised $281 million in September, a percentage difference of 110% from the Trump campaign’s $81 million. Biden’s campaign spent $285 million to the Trump campaign’s $139 million.

As of Sept. 30, the Biden campaign had $114 million more in cash-on-hand than the Trump campaign ($177 million to $63 million), marking the second consecutive month that the Biden campaign has held a cash advantage over Trump. Biden also leads Trump in overall fundraising, cumulatively raising $822 million to Trump’s $557 million.

Both Biden and Trump increased their receipts from August to September: $212 million to $281 million for Biden; and $62 million to $81 million for Trump.

Biden’s $822 million in overall fundraising is the highest figure for any presidential candidate at this point in the past four election cycles. Former President Barack Obama (D) raised $792 million in inflation-adjusted funds at this point in 2008. On the other hand, Trump has more than doubled his fundraising from this point in his 2016 campaign for president: Trump had $557 million, according to Tuesday’s FEC reports, compared to $236 million in October 2016.

Biden’s cash-on-hand total also tops campaign money records. Biden’s total of $177 million is the highest of any candidate’s at this point in the election cycle, topping Obama’s $172 million inflation-adjusted total in 2008.

Biden and Trump’s combined $1.38 billion in fundraising is the highest across the four most recent election cycles. At this point in the 2008 election, the presidential campaigns of Obama and Sen. John McCain (R) had raised a combined inflation-adjusted $1.26 billion.

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DNC outraises RNC for the first time since March

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) outraised the Republican National Committee (RNC) for the first time since March last month, according to September 2020 campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission Sunday.

Last month, the RNC raised $67.6 million and spent $62.6 million, while the DNC raised $78.4 million and spent $26.7 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 61.9% more than the DNC ($532.7 million to $281.0 million). The RNC’s 61.9% fundraising advantage is down from 78.6% in August and 75.0% in July.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle), the RNC had a smaller 24.2% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($231.3 million to $181.4 million).

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $26.9 million and spent $26.0 million last month, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $19.0 million and spent $21.8 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 1.5% more than the DSCC ($167.7 million to $165.2 million). The NRSC’s 1.5% fundraising advantage is down from 7.3% in August and 6.5% in July.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $22.7 million and spent $15.8 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $17.3 million and spent $15.6 million. So far in the cycle, the DCCC has raised 26.3% more than the NRCC ($248.8 million to $191.0 million). The DCCC’s 26.3% advantage is up from 26.2% in August and 25.9% in July.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising. The DSCC had raised 7.8% more than the NRSC ($98.2 million to $90.9 million), while the DCCC had raised 31.3% more than the NRCC ($206.4 million to $150.5 million).

So far in the 2020 campaign cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 24.8% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($891.4 million versus $695.0 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is down from 32.6% in August and 30.1% in July.

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Biden gains cash advantage over Trump for first time in 2020 presidential election cycle

Joe Biden outraised Donald Trump by $150 million according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on September 20.

The Biden campaign raised $212 million in August, a percentage difference of 109% from the Trump campaign’s $62 million. Biden’s campaign spent $130 million to Trump’s $61 million. As of August 31, the Biden campaign had $60 million more in cash on hand than the Trump campaign ($181 million to $121 million), marking the first time his campaign has held a cash advantage over Trump. Biden also leads Trump in overall fundraising for the first time, cumulatively raising $541 million to Trump’s $476 million.

Biden’s campaign more than quadrupled its receipts from July in August ($50 million to $212 million), while Trump’s receipts declined by $10 million ($72 million to $62 million).

Biden’s $541 million in overall fundraising is the second-highest figure for any presidential candidate at this point in the past four cycles. The only candidate to have outraised him was Barack Obama (D), who had raised $598 million in inflation-adjusted funds at this point in 2008. Biden’s cash-on-hand total of $181 million is the highest of any candidate’s at this point in the election cycle, topping Trump’s $121 million this year and Obama’s $102 million in inflation-adjusted cash on hand in September 2012.

Biden and Trump’s combined $1 billion in fundraising is the highest across the four most recent election cycles. At this point in the 2008 campaign, Barack Obama and John McCain (R) had raised a combined inflation-adjusted $908 million.

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RNC outraises DNC more than three-to-one in July

The Republican National Committee (RNC) outraised the Democratic National Committee (DNC) by more than three-to-one last month, according to August 2020 campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on Thursday. This was the fourth month in a row in which the RNC outraised the DNC.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $14.9 million and spent $29.2 million last month, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $13.1 million and spent $10.9 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 7.2% more than the DSCC ($148.7 million to $138.3 million). The NRSC’s 7.2% fundraising advantage is up from 6.5% in July and 7.0% in June.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $18.4 million and spent $14.6 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $13.6 million and spent $8.4 million. So far in the cycle, the DCCC has raised 26.2% more than the NRCC. The DCCC’s 26.2% fundraising advantage is up from 25.9% in July and on par with the same metric in June.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising. The DSCC had raised 10.0% more than the NRSC ($92.5 million to $83.7 million), while the DCCC had raised 27.6% more than the NRCC ($191.0 million to $144.6 million).

Last month, the RNC raised $55.3 million and spent $45.6 million, while the DNC raised $16.3 million and spent $20.3 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 78.6% more than the DNC ($465.1 million to $202.5 million). The RNC’s 78.6% fundraising advantage is up from 75.0% in July and 72.9% in June.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle), the RNC had a smaller 31.1% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($207.9 million to $152.0 million).

So far in the 2020 campaign cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 32.6% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($787.4 million versus $567.0 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is up from 30.1% in July and 29.3% in June.

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Oklahoma campaign finance reports published show Yes on 802 campaign raised nearly 19 times as much as No on 802 campaign

Oklahoma State Question 802 was on the June primary ballot in Oklahoma where it was approved by a vote of 50.49% to 49.51%. The measure expanded Medicaid eligibility to adults between 18 and 65 whose income is 138% of the federal poverty level or below. Campaign finance reports were not due from the campaigns until after the election on July 31, 2020.

Campaign finance reports for the Oklahoma State Question 802 campaigns show aggregate totals through the life of the campaigns. The report filed by Yes on 802-Oklahomans Decide Healthcare covered information as far back as March 6, 2019. The Vote No on 802 Association‘s report covered information from June 8, 2020. Both reports covered through June 30, 2020.

The Yes on 802 campaign raised $5.5 million in cash and $295,000 in in-kind contributions. Of all the funds, 95% came from eight donors, which contributed the following amounts:

  1. Oklahoma Hospital Association: $2.5 million
  2. St. Francis Hospital: $940,000
  3. Tulsa Community Foundation: $923,000
  4. Stacy Schusterman, chair of Samson Energy Company: $500,000
  5. Ascension St John Foundation: $250,000
  6. The Fairness Project: $247,616.61 (in-kind)
  7. Chickasaw Nation: $100,000
  8. Oklahoma Medical Association: $25,000

The support campaign reported $5.47 million in cash expenditures. Sponsors of the measure hired Fieldworks LLC to collect signatures for the petition to qualify this measure for the ballot. A total of $1,836,261.73 was spent to collect the 177,958 valid signatures required to put this measure before voters, resulting in a total cost per required signature (CPRS) of $10.32.

The Vote No on 802 Association, chaired by John Tidwell, state director of Americans for Prosperity, reported $210,600 in cash contributions, $100,084 in in-kind contributions, and $114,950 in cash expenditures. Four donors contributed 100% of the funds:

  1. Americans for Prosperity: $200,000 cash and $99,850 in-kind
  2. Jim Antosh, owner of Round House Workwear LLC: $10,000
  3. Nobel Systems, Inc: $500
  4. John Tidwell: $100 in cash and $234.19 in-kind

Comparison to citizen initiatives of 2018:

Two citizen initiatives were on the 2018 ballot in Oklahoma. The CPRS for State Question 788, which was designed to legalize medical marijuana was $0.41. Sponsors spent $26,988 to collect the required 65,987 signatures. State Question 793, concerning optometrists and opticians operating in retail stores, used volunteers to collect the 123,725 valid signatures, resulting in a CPRS of $0. The number of signatures required to qualify initiatives for the ballot in Oklahoma is tied to the total votes cast for governor in the last gubernatorial election. The number of required signatures increased for initiated constitutional amendments and state statutes in 2020 after the gubernatorial election in 2018.

In 2018, supporters of State Question 788 raised $280,117, and opponents raised $1.26 million. It was approved. Supporters of State Question 793 raised $4.6 million, and opponents raised $3 million.

As of August 3, 2020, 110 statewide ballot measures had been certified for the 2020 ballot in 33 states. Committees registered to support or oppose these statewide measures have reported a combined total of $335.7 million in contributions and $144.2 million in expenditures so far. Of the total contributions in support of or opposition to the 110 statewide measures certified, the 32 citizen-initiated measures featured about 73% of contributions. In 2018, the 68 citizen-initiated measures featured about 83% of the $1.19 billion in campaign contributions for the 167 statewide measures.

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Biden outraised Trump by $8 million, closed cash-on-hand gap in June

Joe Biden outraised Donald Trump by $8 million and closed the cash-on-hand gap in June, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on July 20.

The Biden campaign raised $63.4 million in June, a percentage difference of 13.8% from the Trump campaign’s $55.2 million. Trump’s campaign spent $50.3 million compared to Biden’s $36.9 million. As of June, the Biden and Trump campaigns were nearly matched in cash on hand with $108.9 million and $113 million, respectively. Trump continues to lead Biden in overall fundraising since the beginning of 2017 ($342.7 million to $278.8 million).

Biden’s campaign raised 71% more in June than it did in May ($63.4 million versus $37 million), while Trump more than doubled his receipts ($24.9 million versus $55.2 million).

Trump’s $342.7 million in overall fundraising is the third-highest figure for any presidential candidate at this point in the past four cycles. The only candidate to have outraised him was Barack Obama (D), who had raised $444.3 million in inflation-adjusted funds at this point in 2008 and $358.2 million at this point in 2012. Trump’s cash-on-hand total of $113 million is the highest of any candidate’s at this point in the election cycle, topping Obama’s $112.2 million in inflation-adjusted cash-on-hand in July 2012.

Biden and Trump’s combined $621.6 million in fundraising is the second-highest combined total across the four most recent election cycles. At this point in the 2008 campaign, Barack Obama and John McCain (R) had raised a combined inflation-adjusted $634.1 million. Obama and Mitt Romney (R) had raised a combined $538.5 million in 2012, while Trump and Hillary Clinton (D) had raised a combined $384.1 million.

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RNC outraises DNC by two-to-one, Democratic Hill committees outraise Republican counterparts

The Republican National Committee (RNC) outraised the Democratic National Committee (DNC) by more than two-to-one last month, according to June 2020 campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission June 20. This was the second month in a row in which the RNC outraised the DNC.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $11.2 million and spent $7.7 million last month, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $10.1 million and spent $7.9 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 7.0% more than the DSCC ($119.6 million to $111.5 million). The NRSC’s 7.0% fundraising advantage is down from 8.8% in May and matches its 7.0% advantage in April.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $10.9 million and spent $7.1 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $10.6 million and spent $7.7 million. So far in the cycle, the DCCC has raised 26.2% more than the NRCC ($190.7 million to $146.5 million). The DCCC’s 26.2% fundraising advantage is down from 27.8% in May and 30.0% in April.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising, although their advantage in the House was smaller than in this cycle. The DSCC had raised 15.9% more than the NRSC ($81.3 million to $69.3 million), while the DCCC had raised 24.6% more than the NRCC ($162.2 million to $126.7 million).

Last month, the RNC raised $27.2 million and spent $22.0 million to the DNC’s $11.7 million in fundraising and $12.4 million in spending. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 72.9% more than the DNC ($372.9 million to $173.7 million). The RNC’s 72.9% fundraising advantage is up from 72.4% in May, but down from 73.9% in April.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle), the RNC had a smaller 40.4% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($163.4 million to $108.5 million).

So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 29.3% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($639.0 million to $475.9 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is up from 28.9% in May and 28.4% in April.

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