Tagcolorado

Stories about Colorado

Colorado State Rep. Hugh McKean (R) dies

Colorado State Representative and House Minority Leader Hugh McKean (R) died on Sunday after suffering a heart attack. He was 55 years old.

Before joining the Colorado House of Representatives in 2016, McKean served on the Loveland City Council. He also served on the New Vision Charter School Board and the Thompson School District Master Planning Board.

McKean won the Republican primary on June 28, 2022, winning 56% of the vote. He was running unopposed in next week’s general election. McKean’s replacement will be picked by appointment.

As of November 2022, there have been 132 state legislative vacancies in 42 states. Of the 132 vacancies, 68 are Democratic, 62 are Republican, and two are independent. Democrats have filled 37 vacancies, Republicans have filled 25, and independents have filled one.

Additional reading:

State legislative vacancies, 2022



All candidates for El Paso County Commissioner District 1 in Colorado complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for El Paso County Commissioner District 1 in Colorado — incumbent Holly Williams (R) and Ryan Lucas (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The board of supervisors functions as the county’s primary legislative and policy-making body. Most boards also control county land usage, oversee environmental issues, and possess executive powers, meaning they have the authority to appoint or remove departmental heads. El Paso County has five supervisors who are elected by district to four-year terms.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?  

Williams:

“Our most pressing infrastructure need is our road infrastructure including improvements to major arterials and neighborhood roads. Additionally, road safety and driver speeding has increased the need for additional law enforcement.”

Lucas:       

  • “Public transit.”
  • “Public Health.”
  • “Public financing of elections.”
  • “Transparency of public office.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



Colorado ballot measure committees have raised $41.45 million

As of October 28, Ballotpedia identified $1.01 billion in contributions to support or oppose statewide measures on ballots in 2022. Colorado was among the top five states with the most ballot measure campaign contributions.

According to campaign finance reports due on October 31, which covered information through October 26, 15 committees supporting and opposing eight of the 11 measures on the ballot raised a combined $41.46 million and spent a combined $40.96 million.

Of the 15 committees, three were registered as committees opposing five of the measures. These committees raised $1.1 million. Keeping Colorado Local is a committee opposing all three alcohol initiatives on the November ballot.

The top donors to Colorado initiative campaigns this year included:

  • Colorado Fine Wine & Spirits LLC, which gave $11.59 million, and Robert and David Trone, who gave $1.8 million to Colorado Consumer Choice and Retail Fairness supporting Proposition 124 to expand retail liquor licenses;
  • Several grocery store companies gave $11.59 million to Wine in Grocery Stores, which supports Propositions 125 and 126 to allow wine sales in grocery stores and allow third-party delivery of alcohol. The companies included InstaCart ($4.36 million), DoorDash ($3.58 million), Target ($1.2 million), Albertsons Safeway ($1.36 million), and Kroger ($1.07 million).
  • New Approach PAC, which gave $3.89 million to Natural Medicine Colorado, which supports Proposition 122 to create a psychedelic plant and fungi access program; and
  • Gary Ventures Inc. and Gary Community Advocacy, which gave $2.55 million to Coloradans for Affordable Housing Now, which supports Proposition 123 to implement funding for housing projects through existing tax revenue.

In total, campaigns for six initiatives spent a combined $7.36 million on signature-gathering costs to put their initiatives on the ballot. The Wine in Grocery Stores PAC, which sponsored Proposition 125 and Proposition 126, paid Scotch Strategies $50,000 for the purpose of signature gathering. The PAC reported $3.19 million in expenditures to various entities for the purpose of consultant and professional services, which can include signature-gathering expenditures. Ballotpedia could not determine whether those additional expenditures were signature-gathering costs.

The next campaign finance report for Colorado ballot measure committees is due on December 13.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Colorado State Board of Education District 6 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado State Board of Education District 6 — incumbent Rebecca McClellan (D) and Molly Lamar (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.  

The Colorado State Board of Education is an elected executive agency of the Colorado state government, responsible for managing the state’s public K-12 education. The board’s stated mission is “to provide all of Colorado’s children equal access to quality, thorough, uniform, well-rounded educational opportunities in a safe and civil learning environment.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?    

McClellan:           

  • “Academic growth and achievement are my top priority. I’m pleased to have successfully advocated to prioritize our state’s ESSER funds on proven strategies like high impact tutoring.”
  • “Working with parents, I have supported the bipartisan READ Act to deliver evidence-based literacy instruction to more Colorado students, including students with dyslexia.”
  • “I am endorsed by parents, teachers, and school leaders for my demonstrated commitment to academic excellence and opportunity for all Colorado Students.”

Lamar:       

  • “Parent engagement and partnerships. Across our state we are facing a crisis concerning student performance. Currently, 60 percent of Colorado third graders cannot read at grade level. 70 percent are not proficient in math. What we are doing is not working.”
  • “Improving academic outcomes. School districts are spending exorbitant amounts of money on divisive programs that do little to improve academic outcomes.”
  • “School safety. I will collaborate with school districts and law enforcement in implementing safety measures such as additional cameras, locks on all exterior doors, and School Resource Officers (SROs) to ensure the safety of our children.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for the Colorado State Board of Education’s at-large seat complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All four of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for the Colorado State Board of Education’s at-large seat completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The candidates are: Kathy Plomer (D),  Dan Maloit (R), Ryan Van Gundy (L), and Eric Bodenstab (Unity Party).

The Colorado State Board of Education is an elected executive agency of the Colorado state government, responsible for managing the state’s public K-12 education. The board’s stated mission is “to provide all of Colorado’s children equal access to quality, thorough, uniform, well-rounded educational opportunities in a safe and civil learning environment.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?    

Plomer:               

  • “My first key issue as a State Board member is to ensure academic excellence for all Colorado Students.”
  • “Second, we need to elevate the teaching profession to attract and retain the best educators.”
  • “Third is promoting accountability and transparency through partnerships of students, parents and the community to create the best outcomes for all students by using student achievement data, budget priorities and shared goals.”

Maloit:           

  • “All of our children deserve an education that is at the peak of academic excellence, focusing on literacy, math, science, and history.”
  • “Teachers are professionals that should be well compensated and enabled with the skills to serve our children.”
  • “Parents deserve to have choices in, and control over, the schools that serve their children.”

Van Gundy:   

  • “Efficient robust education that fits all citizens. Allowing for school of choice, as well a STEAM oriented curriculum.”
  • “Educator hiring and retention.”
  • “Safer schools and making CO the number 1 state for education”

Bodenstab:       

  • “Unity in Education”
  • “No politics K-12”
  • “Be prepared”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Colorado State Board of Education elections, 2022



All candidates for Colorado House of Representatives District 11 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado House of Representatives District 11 — incumbent Karen McCormick (D) and Tara Menza (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Colorado’s state legislature. Colorado is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?                        

McCormick:

  • “Strong support of public education is a critical part of the foundation of our system of government. I ran for office to prioritize funding for public education, educators, schools and students across our state.”
  • “Current and future generations are depending on us to take bold action to mitigate the effects of climate change and protect our precious resources of water, land and air. This is our only Earth and it will take everything we’ve got to be sure we have a liveable planet well into the future.”
  • “Health care is a fundamental need for all humans. We need food, water, shelter and care when sick or injured. Our systems of physical and mental health care delivery continue to need measures to lower costs and increase accessibility.”

Menza:           

  • “Tara will take crime seriously with the goal of getting drugs off our streets and ensuring hardened criminals are fully prosecuted while seeking solutions to address root causes of rising crime, such as mental health and addiction.”
  • “Tara’s legislative fiscal goals will be to help keep costs low for citizens, their families, and local small businesses. She will work to ensure homeowners and renters don’t get pushed out of their communities due to regulations and high taxes.”
  • “Tara will support legislation for school choice, homeschool protections, parental rights, and more transparency in Colorado’s state education curriculum. Children belong to their parents, not the government and the state’s policies need to focus on education, nothing else.”       

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Colorado House of Representatives elections, 2022



All candidates for Arapahoe County Assessor in Colorado complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All three of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Arapahoe County Assessor in Colorado — incumbent PK Kaiser (D), Robert Andrews (R), and Joshua Lallement (L) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the Arapahoe County website, the County Assessor “discovers, lists, classifies and values all real and personal property in Arapahoe County. The Assessor’s Office also is responsible for maintaining public records, including ownership and parcel maps.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?    

Kaiser:       

  • “Transparency, Accountability, Fairness and Equity”
  • “Serving senior citizens and disabled veterans with property tax exemption”
  • “I am committed to serve the people, year after year and election after election”

Andrews:   

  • “Experience Matters – I have appraised thousands of home and my opponent has never appraised a property.”
  • “Arapahoe County Deserves Better! The assessors office is a full-time position and expect the Assessor to report to work every day and all day.”
  • “I will advocate to increase the, 20 year old, Senior Homestead Exemption & Disables Veterans Act is funded and increased to keep up with inflation.”

Lallement:       

  • “Understanding that taxation destroys, and punishes prosperity.”
  • “Solution, start by assessing one-dollar property taxes across the board, and go from there as the people of Arapahoe County are able, and willing.”
  • “The current system of assessment, and valuing property in Arapahoe County is also a great destruction of Liberty when properties are assessed higher for the sole corrupt purpose of raising taxes to fund monopolized government bureaucracies.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Colorado House of Representatives District 49 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado House of Representatives District 49 — incumbent Judith Amabile (D), Kathryn Lehr (R), and Daniel Lutz (L) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Colorado’s state legislature. Colorado is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Amabile:           

“I am passionate about mental health access. I’m one of a legion of parents who know the despair of trying to access mental health services in a system that seems designed for failure.”

Lehr:   

“It’s time to get rid of the political overclass who are concerned with moving Colorado further to the left in an effort to create permanent majorities in the Governor’s office, the General Assembly, and all the way down to school boards and clerks and recorders.”

Lutz:

“I am passionate about policy concerning Fire safety and Environmental conservation, my time in the Marines has given me a passion for policies concerning veterans care and general public safety.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Colorado State Senate District 8 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado State Senate District 8 — Dylan Roberts (D) and Matt Solomon (R)  — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Colorado’s state legislature. Colorado is one of 14 states with a Democratic party trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Roberts:       

  • “The state legislature must have a relentless focus on lowering the cost of living in our mountain and rural communities.”
  • “The threat of drought, wildfire, and climate change is one that imperils our economic and personal futures.”
  • “As a State Senator, I will ensure that women’s personal freedoms are protected in Colorado, that equality is not infringed by state law, and that our democracy is preserved..”

Solomon:               

  • “Matt believes in Individual Freedom and Liberties and advocates for the Safety of Coloradans. Matt’s ability to bring experience and perspective from both public and private sector is what makes him District 8’s best choice for Senator.”
  • “Matt’s personal mantra is to live with honor, act with integrity, and speak the truth.”
  • “Matt’s decision-making process is dedicated to transparency, consistency, and predictability”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Colorado State Senate election, 2022



Three candidates running for Colorado treasurer on Nov. 8

Incumbent Dave Young (D), Lang Sias (R), and Anthony Delgado (L) are running for Colorado treasurer on Nov. 8, 2022. 

Young was elected treasurer in 2018 and served in the Colorado House of Representatives, representing District 50 from 2011 to 2019. Young’s professional experience includes working as an instructor at Heath Junior High in Greeley, an information architect for a web design firm, and an adjunct professor at the University of Colorado, Denver. Young’s campaign website emphasized his experience as treasurer, stating Young “identified funding that was used to make $2.4 billion in infrastructure improvements” and “set-up a new, $250 million small business loan program to help Colorado grow and recover into a strong economy.”

Sias was a member of the Colorado House of Representatives, representing District 27 from 2015 to 2019. He also ran on a joint ticket with the gubernatorial nominee Walker Stapleton (R) in 2018. Sias’ career experience includes serving as a U.S. Navy and Air National Guard fighter pilot and working as an attorney. Sias said, “I’m running for Colorado State Treasurer because Colorado families and taxpayers deserve a champion for transparency and accountability.” Sias also highlighted his experience in the state House, saying he “focused on solving problems in the areas of education, health care, and small business, and on government transparency and accountability.”

In 2018, Young defeated Brian Watson (R) 52.2%-44.9%. Walker Stapleton (R) was the Colorado treasurer before Young. Stapleton served from 2011 to 2019.

The treasurer oversees the Department of the Treasury, which acts as the state government’s bank. The treasury receives all revenues (taxes, fees, etc.), manages the state’s investment funds, and disburses money based on warrants (checks) drawn against the treasury. Treasurers are elected to four-year terms in federal midterm election years.