Tagelections

Voters decide congressional primaries in three states, runoffs in MS, NC

Three states held congressional primaries on June 23, 2020, and two states held primary runoffs. Forty-four congressional seats were on the ballot, including two U.S. Senate seats and 42 U.S. House seats. The general election for all five states is November 3, 2020.

Kentucky held primaries for one U.S. Senate seat and six U.S. House seats.

  • U.S. Senate incumbent Mitch McConnell (R) advanced from his primary. The results of the Democratic primary were still pending as of June 25, 2020.
  • All six incumbents in the U.S. House—one Democrat and five Republicans—ran for re-election in the primaries. All six advanced to the general election.

Mississippi held a Republican primary runoff for the state’s 2nd Congressional District seat in the U.S. House. Brian Flowers defeated Thomas Carey and advanced to the general election.

New York held primaries for 27 U.S. House seats. Twenty-three incumbents—19 Democrats and four Republicans—ran for re-election. Eighteen incumbents advanced from their primaries, and one was defeated. The other four primaries had results still pending as of June 25, 2020.

North Carolina held a Republican primary runoff for the state’s 11th Congressional District seat in the U.S. House. Madison Cawthorn defeated Lynda Bennett and advanced to the general election.

Virginia held primaries for one U.S. Senate seat and seven U.S. House seats. Four of Virginia’s 11 U.S. House seats—Districts 7, 8, 9, and 10—were not on the ballot because they either held conventions instead of primaries or because their primaries were canceled due to lack of opposition.

  • U.S. Senate incumbent Mark Warner (D) was the only candidate to file in the Democratic primary and advanced to the general election by default. In the Republican primary, Daniel Gade defeated two opponents and advanced to the general election.
  • Ten U.S. House incumbents—seven Democrats and three Republicans—ran for re-election in either primaries or conventions. All 10 advanced to the general election.

Entering the November 2020 general election, the U.S. Senate has 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democratic Party. Thirty-five of the 100 U.S. Senate seats are up for election, including two seats up for special election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. The U.S. House of Representatives has 233 Democrats, 197 Republicans, one Libertarian, and four vacancies. All 435 U.S. House seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

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2,989 major party candidates filed for 2020 Congress elections

As of June 22, 2,989 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 453 candidates are filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 362—185 Democrats and 177 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 2,974 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,627—1,238 Democrats and 1,389 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

Thirty-six members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans and nine Democrats. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 233 seats.

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