TagFederal Register

Federal Register weekly update: 22 new significant documents

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From Oct. 4-Oct. 8, the Federal Register grew by 2,058 pages for a year-to-date total of 56,644 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 628 documents:

  • 500 notices
  • 14 presidential documents
  • 37 proposed rules
  • 77 final rules

Seven proposed rules, including a National Environmental Policy Act implementing regulations revision from the Council on Environmental Quality, and 15 final rules, including one aimed at providing access to family planning services from the Health and Human Services Department, were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 71 significant proposed rules, 95 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of Oct. 8.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2019: https://ballotpedia.org/Historical_additions_to_the_Federal_Register,_1936-2019



Federal Register weekly update: Over 600 new documents added

Banner with the words "The Administrative State Project"

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From September 27 through October 1, the Federal Register grew by 1,402 pages for a year-to-date total of 54,586 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 638 documents:

  • 502 notices
  • Four presidential documents
  • 39 proposed rules
  • 93 final rules

Three proposed rules, including standards related to the manufacture of class II ozone-depleting substances for feedstock from the Environmental Protection Agency, and 11 final rules, including rulemaking and guidance procedures from the Education Department, were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 64 significant proposed rules, 80 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of October 1.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017. 

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Federal Register weekly update: Nine new significant documents added

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From Sept. 20 through Sept. 24, the Federal Register grew by 1,114 pages for a year-to-date total of 53,184 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 597 documents:

Three proposed rules, including an energy conservation program from the Energy Department, and six final rules, including a correction to the Environmental Protection Agency GHG emission standards and test procedures for control of air pollution from airplanes and airplane engines, were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 61 significant proposed rules, 69 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of Sept. 24.

  • 492 notices
  • Seven presidential documents
  • 31 proposed rules
  • 67 final rules

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Additional reading:



Federal Register weekly update: 14 new significant rules

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s overall regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From Sept. 13 through Sept. 17, the Federal Register grew by 1,234 pages for a year-to-date total of 52,070 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 576 documents:

  • 458 notices
  • 13 presidential documents
  • 46 proposed rules
  • 59 final rules

Six proposed rules, including a call for public input from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regarding authorization for the incidental taking of eagles, and eight final rules, including a court-ordered delay of a Food and Drug Administration rule concerning tobacco product warnings, were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 58 significant proposed rules, 63 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of Sept. 17.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017: Changes to the Federal Register 

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Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2019: Historical additions to the Federal Register, 1936-2019



Federal Register weekly update: Tops 50,000 pages

Photo of the White House in Washington, D.C.

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s overall regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From Sept. 6 through Sept. 10, the Federal Register grew by 934 pages for a year-to-date total of 50,836 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 449 documents:

  1. 354 notices
  2. Seven presidential documents
  3. 29 proposed rules
  4. 59 final rules

Three proposed rules, including a new mine safety program from the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), and two final rules, including a revision to the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) hazard mitigation assistance and mitigation planning regulations, were deemed significant under E.O. 12866— defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 52 significant proposed rules, 55 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of Sept. 10.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017.

Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2019.



Federal Register weekly update: More than 250 presidential documents issued so far in 2021

Graphic with the five pillars of the

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s overall regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From August 30 through September 3, the Federal Register grew by 1,608 pages for a year-to-date total of 49,902 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 590 documents:

  1. 467 notices
  2. 11 presidential documents
  3. 39 proposed rules
  4. 73 final rules

Five proposed rules, including new migratory game bird hunting regulations from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and seven final rules, including the establishment of a dairy product donation program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 49 significant proposed rules, 53 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of September 3.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017.

Additional reading:



Federal Register weekly update: 611 new documents added

Banner with the words "The Administrative State Project"

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s overall regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From August 23 through August 27, the Federal Register grew by 1,344 pages for a year-to-date total of 48,294 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 611 documents:

  1. 495 notices
  2. Two presidential documents
  3. 52 proposed rules
  4. 62 final rules

Seven proposed rules and five final rules were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 44 significant proposed rules, 46 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of August 27.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Additional reading:



Federal Register weekly update: More than 2,000 final rules added so far in 2021

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s overall regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From August 16 through August 20, the Federal Register grew by 2,178 pages for a year-to-date total of 46,950 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 515 documents:

  1. 426 notices
  2. Three presidential documents
  3. 28 proposed rules
  4. 58 final rules

Three proposed rules and six final rules were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 37 significant proposed rules, 41 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of August 20.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017.

Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2019.



Federal Register weekly update: Seven significant final rules added

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s overall regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From August 9 through August 13, the Federal Register grew by 1,392 pages for a year-to-date total of 44,772 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 540 documents:

  1. 414 notices
  2. Six presidential documents
  3. 56 proposed rules
  4. 64 final rules

Six proposed rules and seven final rules were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 34 significant proposed rules, 35 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of August 13.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click below to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017.



Federal Register weekly update: Thirteen significant documents added

Photo of the White House in Washington, D.C.

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s overall regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From August 2 through August 6, the Federal Register grew by 2,000 pages for a year-to-date total of 43,380 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 499 documents:

  • 394 notices
  • No presidential documents
  • 38 proposed rules
  • 67 final rules

Four proposed rules and nine final rules were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 28 significant proposed rules, 28 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of August 6.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017: Changes to the Federal Register 

Additional reading:

Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2019: Historical additions to the Federal Register, 1936-2019