TagFederal Register

Federal Register weekly update: Lowest weekly final rule total since May

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

From August 3 to August 7, the Federal Register grew by 1,544 pages for a year-to-date total of 48,074 pages. Over the same period in 2019 and 2018, the Federal Register reached 39,722 pages and 39,870 pages, respectively. As of August 6, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 8,352 pages and the 2018 total by 8,204 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 575 documents:

• 470 notices
• nine presidential documents
• 42 proposed rules

• 54 final rules

One proposed rule concerning oversight of organic agricultural products was deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that it could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Trump administration in 2020 has issued 24 significant proposed rules, 41 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of August 6.

Not all rules issued by the Trump administration are regulatory actions. Some rules are deregulatory actions pursuant to President Trump’s (R) Executive Order 13771, which requires federal agencies to eliminate two old significant regulations for each new significant regulation issued.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2018 and 2017: Changes to the Federal Register

Additional reading:
Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2018: Historical additions to the Federal Register, 1936-2018


Federal Register weekly update: Two new significant final rules published

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

From July 27 to July 31, the Federal Register grew by 1,474 pages for a year-to-date total of 46,530 pages. Over the same period in 2019 and 2018, the Federal Register reached 37,954 pages and 38,244 pages, respectively. As of July 31, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 8,576 pages and the 2018 total by 8,286 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 522 documents:
• 410 notices
• eight presidential documents
• 38 proposed rules

• 66 final rules

Two final rules concerning chemicals regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act and surety companies certified by the Department of the Treasury were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that they could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Trump administration in 2020 has issued 23 significant proposed rules, 41 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of July 24.

Not all rules issued by the Trump administration are regulatory actions. Some rules are deregulatory actions pursuant to President Trump’s (R) Executive Order 13771, which requires federal agencies to eliminate two old significant regulations for each new significant regulation issued.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Additional reading:

Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2018: Historical additions to the Federal Register, 1936-2018



Federal Register weekly update; highest weekly final rule total of 2020 to date

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

From July 6 to July 10, the Federal Register grew by 1,818 pages for a year-to-date total of 41,904 pages. Over the same period in 2019 and 2018, the Federal Register reached 33,690 pages and 32,758 pages, respectively. As of July 10, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 8,214 pages and the 2018 total by 9,146 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 608 documents:
  • 470 notices
  • two presidential documents
  • 43 proposed rules
  • 93 final rules

Three final rules concerning pipelines, coal mines, and fuel-efficient vehicles were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that they could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Trump administration in 2020 has issued 21 significant proposed rules, 34 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of July 10.

Not all rules issued by the Trump administration are regulatory actions. Some rules are deregulatory actions pursuant to President Trump’s (R) Executive Order 13771, which requires federal agencies to eliminate two old significant regulations for each new significant regulation issued.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Additional reading:
Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2018.


Federal Register weekly update; highest weekly final rule total since March

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

From June 22 to June 26, the Federal Register grew by 1,410 pages for a year-to-date total of 38,740 pages. Over the same period in 2019 and 2018, the Federal Register reached 31,170 pages and 30,830 pages, respectively. As of June 26, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 7,570 pages and the 2018 total by 7,910 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 522 documents:

• 406 notices
• three presidential documents
• 31 proposed rules
• 82 final rules
Two final rules concerning veterans grants and the Federal Home Loan Bank were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that they could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Trump administration in 2020 has issued 21 significant proposed rules, 30 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of June 26.

Not all rules issued by the Trump administration are regulatory actions. Some rules are deregulatory actions pursuant to President Trump’s (R) Executive Order 13771, which requires federal agencies to eliminate two old significant regulations for each new significant regulation issued.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2018 and 2017.

Additional reading:



Federal Register weekly update; tops 37,000 pages

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

From June 15 to June 19, the Federal Register grew by 1,192 pages for a year-to-date total of 37,330 pages. Over the same period in 2019 and 2018, the Federal Register reached 29,370 pages and 29,434 pages, respectively. As of June 19, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 7,960 pages and the 2018 total by 7,896 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 477 documents:

• 393 notices
• five presidential documents
• 24 proposed rules
• 55 final rules

One notice related to hazardous air pollutants was deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that it could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. The Trump administration in 2020 has issued 21 significant proposed rules, 28 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of June 19.

Not all rules issued by the Trump administration are regulatory actions. Some rules are deregulatory actions pursuant to President Trump’s (R) Executive Order 13771, which requires federal agencies to eliminate two existing significant regulations for each new significant regulation issued.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2018 and 2017.

Additional reading:



Federal Register weekly update; lowest weekly page total since first week of January

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

From June 8 to June 12, the Federal Register grew by 1,182 pages for a year-to-date total of 36,138 pages. Over the same period in 2019 and 2018, the Federal Register reached 27,906 pages and 28,150 pages, respectively. As of June 12, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 8,232 pages and the 2018 total by 7,988 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 516 documents:
• 413 notices
• four presidential documents
• 53 proposed rules
• 48 final rules
No proposed or final rules were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that they could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Trump administration in 2020 has issued 21 significant proposed rules and 28 significant final rules as of June 12.

Not all rules issued by the Trump administration are regulatory actions. Some rules are deregulatory actions pursuant to President Trump’s (R) Executive Order 13771, which requires federal agencies to eliminate two old significant regulations for each new significant regulation issued.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2018 and 2017.

Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2018.



Federal Register weekly update; highest weekly document total since March

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

From June 1 to June 5, the Federal Register grew by 1,980 pages for a year-to-date total of 34,956 pages. Over the same period in 2019 and 2018, the Federal Register reached 26,738 pages and 26,832 pages, respectively. As of June 5, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 8,218 pages and the 2018 total by 8,124 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 631 documents:
  • 501 notices
  • nine presidential documents
  • 52 proposed rules
  • 69 final rules

One proposed rule concerning official time in federal sector cases before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission was deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that it could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Trump administration in 2020 has issued 21 significant proposed rules and 28 significant final rules as of June 5.

Not all rules issued by the Trump administration are regulatory actions. Some rules are deregulatory actions pursuant to President Trump’s (R) Executive Order 13771, which requires federal agencies to eliminate two old significant regulations for each new significant regulation issued.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Additional reading:


Federal Register weekly update; highest weekly presidential document total of 2020 to date

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

From May 4 to May 8, the Federal Register grew by 1,326 pages for a year-to-date total of 27,644 pages. Over the same period in 2019 and 2018, the Federal Register reached 20,764 pages and 22,176 pages, respectively. As of May 8, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 6,880 pages and the 2018 total by 5,468 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 570 types of documents:
  • 428 notices
  • 16 presidential documents
  • 57 proposed rules
  • 69 final rules

No proposed or final rules were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that they could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Trump administration in 2020 has issued 15 significant proposed rules and 24 significant final rules as of May 8.

Not all rules issued by the Trump administration are regulatory actions. Some rules are deregulatory actions pursuant to President Trump’s (R) Executive Order 13771, which requires federal agencies to eliminate two old significant regulations for each new significant regulation issued.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2018.


Federal Register weekly update; Trump administration’s largest weekly page total tops 3,100 pages

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

From April 27 to May 1, the Federal Register grew by 3,144 pages for a year-to-date total of 26,318 pages. Over the same period in 2019 and 2018, the Federal Register reached 19,682 pages and 19,904 pages, respectively. As of May 1, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 6,636 pages and the 2018 total by 6,414 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 527 documents:
  • 425 notices
  • five presidential documents
  • 49 proposed rules
  • 48 final rules

Four final rules were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that they could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Trump administration in 2020 has issued 15 significant proposed rules and 24 significant final rules as of May 1.

Not all rules issued by the Trump administration are regulatory actions. Some rules are deregulatory actions pursuant to President Trump’s (R) Executive Order 13771, which requires federal agencies to eliminate two old significant regulations for each new significant regulation issued.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2018.


New definition of “waters of the United States” reins in federal control of water pollution

On April 21, the Trump administration implemented its new definition of waters that fall within the scope of those regulated under the Clean Water Act (CWA).

The new waters of the United States (WOTUS) definition narrows federal jurisdiction over intrastate waters as well as groundwater, roadside ditches, converted cropland, stormwater controls, and waste treatment systems. The new WOTUS definition is effective as of June 22, 2020.

According to the summary of the updated definition posted in the Federal Register, the new rule aims “to restore and maintain the integrity of the nation’s waters by maintaining federal authority over those waters that Congress determined should be regulated by the Federal government under its Commerce Clause powers, while adhering to Congress’ policy directive to preserve States’ primary authority over land and water resources.”

The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had originally proposed a revision of the definition of WOTUS in December 2018 to replace the Obama Administration’s expansion of federal powers under the Clean Water Act. They had done so after President Trump signed an executive order on February 28, 2017, directing the EPA to review and either rescind or revise the 2015 Obama administration definition.

Opponents of the revision argue that the new WOTUS definition is too narrow and might allow pollutants to enter Americans’ drinking water. Supporters of the revision believe it is necessary because, in their view, the Obama-era definition infringed on property rights and on state authority to regulate inland waters.

Learn more about the Clean Water Act and the EPA.



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