TagFederal Register

Federal Register weekly update: 599 documents added

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From June 27 through July 1, the Federal Register grew by 1,756 pages for a year-to-date total of 39,732 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 599 documents:

  • 460 notices
  • Five presidential documents
  • 44 proposed rules
  • 90 final rules

Four proposed rules, including revisions to criteria for evaluating cardiovascular disorders under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act from the Social Security Administration, and seven final rules, including standards to implement renewable fuel volume targets from the Environmental Protection Agency were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 99 significant proposed rules, 127 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of July 1.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Federal Register weekly update: Lowest weekly final rule total so far in 2022

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From June 20 through June 24, the Federal Register grew by 1,214 pages for a year-to-date total of 37,976 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 397 documents:

  • 324 notices
  • Six presidential documents
  • 34 proposed rules
  • 33 final rules

Five proposed rules, including minimum standards for projects under the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) Formula Program from the Federal Highway Administration, and five final rules, including a delay of the effective date of an interim rule to amend the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) regulations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 95 significant proposed rules, 120 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of June 24.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Federal Register weekly update: 555 documents added

Photo of the White House in Washington, D.C.

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From June 13 through June 17, the Federal Register grew by 1,120 pages for a year-to-date total of 36,762 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 555 documents:

  • 437 notices
  • Six presidential documents
  • 57 proposed rules
  • 55 final rules

Four proposed rules, including fuel efficiency requirements for certification of certain airplanes from the Federal Aviation Administration, and two final rules, including an increase to small business size standards for North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) sectors relating to wholesale and retail trade from the Small Business Administration were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 90 significant proposed rules, 115 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of June 17.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Federal Register weekly update: More than 10,000 notices issued so far in 2022

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From June 6 through June 10, the Federal Register grew by 1,576 pages for a year-to-date total of 35,642 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 576 documents:

  • 454 notices
  • Eight presidential documents
  • 42 proposed rules
  • 72 final rules

Four proposed rules, including revisions to the 2020 water quality certification regulatory requirements under the Clean Water Act (CWA) section 401 from the Environmental Protection Agency, and four final rules, including an amendment to regulations to waive excess and unauthorized grazing fees as a result of unforeseen circumstances from the Forest Service Agency were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 86 significant proposed rules, 113 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of June 10.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Federal Register weekly update: 1,778 pages added

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From May 30 through June 3, the Federal Register grew by 1,778 pages for a year-to-date total of 34,066 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 493 documents:

  • 378 notices
  • 13 presidential documents
  • 40 proposed rules
  • 62 final rules

One proposed rule, including amendments to the Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP) to support program stability and flexibility from the Personnel Management Office, and eight final rules, including energy conservation standards for manufactured housing from the Energy Department were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 82 significant proposed rules, 109 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of June 3.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017: https://ballotpedia.org/Changes_to_the_Federal_Register 

Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2019: https://ballotpedia.org/Historical_additions_to_the_Federal_Register,_1936-2019



Federal Register weekly update: More than 100 significant final rules issued so far in 2022

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From May 23 through May 27, the Federal Register grew by 1,196 pages for a year-to-date total of 32,288 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 560 documents:

  • 449 notices
  • Five presidential documents
  • 40 proposed rules
  • 66 final rules

Four proposed rules, including an extension to the comment period on a proposed rule to improve tracking of workplace injuries and illnesses from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and seven final rules, including maintenance technician training regulations to conform with the Aircraft Certification, Safety, and Accountability Act from the Federal Aviation Administration were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 81 significant proposed rules, 101 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of May 27.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Federal Register weekly update: 1,446 pages added

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From May 16 through May 20, the Federal Register grew by 1,446 pages for a year-to-date total of 31,092 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 507 documents:

  • 411 notices
  • Seven presidential documents
  • 28 proposed rules
  • 61 final rules

Five proposed rules, including an amendment to Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) standards for commercial water heating equipment from the Energy Department, and three final rules, including an increase to the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) travel promotion fee from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 77 significant proposed rules, 94 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of May 20.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Federal Register weekly update: Tops 10,000 total documents

Image of the south facade of the White House.

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From May 9 through May 13, the Federal Register grew by 2,208 pages for a year-to-date total of 29,646 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 580 documents:

  • 470 notices
  • 11 presidential documents
  • 32 proposed rules
  • 67 final rules

Two proposed rules, including changes to rules governing Carrier Automated Tariffs from the Federal Maritime Commission, and five final rules, including an amendment to the National Marine Sanctuaries program regulations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 72 significant proposed rules, 91 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of May 13.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Federal Register weekly update: Highest weekly presidential document total so far in 2022

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From May 2 through May 6, the Federal Register grew by 1,870 pages for a year-to-date total of 27,438 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 506 documents:

  • 394 notices
  • 14 presidential documents
  • 42 proposed rules
  • 56 final rules

Three proposed rules, including a correction to a proposed rule to amend regulations relating to the decommissioning process from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and seven final rules, including an update to the National Bridge Inspection Standards (NBIS) for highway bridges from the Federal Highway Administration were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 70 significant proposed rules, 86 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of May 6.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Federal Register weekly update: Tops 25,000 pages

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From April 25 through April 29, the Federal Register grew by 1,302 pages for a year-to-date total of 25,568 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 592 documents:

  • 494 notices
  • Five presidential documents
  • 36 proposed rules
  • 57 final rules

Three proposed rules, including an amendment to rules regarding when a federal employer may collect criminal history information as part of the Fair Chance to Compete for Jobs Act of 2019 from the Personnel Management Office, and three final rules, including an amendment to the regulatory definitions of “firearm frame or receiver” and “frame or receiver” from the Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Bureau were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 67 significant proposed rules, 79 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of April 29.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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