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Stories about Florida

Florida Republican candidates have spent $132.6 million more than Democrats

In Florida, state-level candidates have spent $251.1 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Nov. 3, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $51.5 million and Republican candidates have spent $184.1 million. 

Florida Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 11/3/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 11/3/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 265 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Florida Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Charlie Crist$30,883,270.61
2.Nicole Nikki Fried$3,570,644.83
3.Loranne Ausley$627,464.43
4.Reggie Gaffney$604,677.91
5.Hillary Cassel$584,831.46
6.Lauren Book$562,342.35
7.Barbara Sharief$549,734.40
8.Janet Cruz$436,164.48
9.Annette Taddeo$383,267.42
10.Allison Tant$378,290.31

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 11/3/2022)

During the same time period, 276 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Florida Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Ron DeSantis$129,719,733.61
2.Wilton Simpson$8,867,338.49
3.Ashley Moody$6,610,295.19
4.Ralph E Massullo Jr$1,738,018.86
5.Jimmy Patronis$1,384,415.66
6.Colleen Burton$950,372.27
7.Ed Hooper$913,910.56
8.David Smith$693,118.71
9.Ray Rodrigues$681,609.50
10.Jessica Baker$622,255.67

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Florida candidate PACs submitted to the Florida Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Name of ReportReporting PeriodDeadline
2021 Q4 (2021 M12)10/1/2021 – 12/31/20211/10/2022
2022 Q1 (2022 M1,M2,M3)1/1/2022 – 3/31/20224/11/2022
2022 Primary 2 (M4, M5, Primary 1 & P2)4/1/2022 – 6/30/20227/8/2022
2022 General 1 (Primary 2, 2A, 3,4,5,6, P7 & General 1, G1A)7/1/2022 – 9/2/20229/9/2022
2022 General 3 (General 2,2A,3 & 3A)9/3/2022 – 9/30/202210/7/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual (General 4, 4A, 5 & Semiannual)10/1/2022 – 12/31/20221/10/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



All candidates for Florida House of Representatives District 37 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Florida House of Representatives District 37 — incumbent Carlos Guillermo Smith (D) and Susan Plasencia (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Florida’s state legislature. Florida is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office? 

Smith:   

  • “Gun Reform is needed so families can feel safe and to lessen gun violence in Florida.”
  • “We must protect Abortion Healthcare Access and reproductive rights.”
  • “We must support teachers and public school administration/staff. Paying them living wages.”

Plasencia:           

  • “The Federal Government is the main driving force of our high gas prices. I support suspension or tax holiday from the State Gas Tax.”
  • “School Safety Create an environment which lowers the cost of housing by working to remove red tape that hinders home builders while continuing to protect the rural boundaries.”
  • “Our children are what is most important to us. I support and will work with Law Enforcement to provide Resource Officers in our schools.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Florida House of Representatives elections, 2022



All candidates for Florida House of Representatives District 47 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Florida House of Representatives District 47 — Anthony Nieves (D) and Paula Stark (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Florida’s state legislature. Florida is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office? 

Nieves:       

  • “I am a lifelong ultra progressive member of the Democratic Party and founding year member of the Working Families Party.”
  • “I strongly support aggressive criminal justice reform that includes the decriminalization of cannabis related offenses, and voting rights restoration.”
  • “I support universal healthcare for all, and free college for all.”

Stark:

  • “Managing growth and Infrastructure needs”
  • “Attracting Higher paying Jobs while promoting education through trade opportunities”
  • “Supporting First Responder and Veteran services”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Florida House of Representatives District 42 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Florida House of Representatives District 42 — incumbent Anna Eskamani (D) and Bonnie Jackson (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Florida’s state legislature. Florida is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office? 

Eskamani:       

  • “While Tallahassee politicians are focused on stealing women’s rights, silencing teachers and pushing culture wars, we’re fighting to help parents feed their families, seniors afford their medicine, small businesses create jobs and everyone have an affordable place to live.”
  • “My parents worked seven days a week to pay the rent and keep food on the table. Today it’s even harder for families. I will always fight to deliver relief to Florida families and hold corrupt price gougers accountable.”
  • “Whether it’s reproductive rights, environmental protection, public education, health care access, housing affordability, tax policy, public safety or equality — Anna is someone who solves problems, and focuses on everyday people.”

Jackson:       

  • “Parents have the right to demand a quality education for their children taught in a safe environment. Our public schools have been transformed into pods for community organizing with a social justice agenda, instead of incubators of learning, critical thinking, and rewarding academic achievement.”
  • “I intend to work hard toward a system of mandatory E-verify for employers. Employers must be held accountable, including criminal penalties, if they do not use the E-verify system to ensure that a person being hired is not only here legally, but that they are legally able to work.”
  • “Voters have lost confidence in our institutions of government, especially in the integrity of our elections. It is one of the primary benefits of citizenship, if not the primary benefit.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Florida’s 10th Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All four of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Florida’s 10th Congressional District completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The candidates are: Maxwell Alejandro Frost (D), Calvin Wimbish (R), Jason Holic (I), and Usha Jain (I).  

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of November 3, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-212 advantage in the U.S. House with three vacant seats. Florida’s current congressional delegation consists of 9 Democrats and 16 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Frost:       

  • “Ending Gun Violence 40,000 Americans die due to gun-related deaths each year. The most vulnerable members of our society account for the majority of those deaths.”
  • “Medicare For All The United States has failed to provide a basic social minimum to its citizens.”
  • “Environmental Justice The greatest challenge facing our country and the world is the climate crisis.”

Wimbish:               

  • “I Heard You! I’m answering the call to put on the ARMOR OF GOD to defend our Homeland from all enemies!”
  • “We’re at war to unseat corrupt political leaders who push systematically transforming America into a socialist nation!”
  • “In the same spirit of ‘Frederick Douglas, Martin Luther King and Ronald Reagan’, let’s be active in defending conservative values and join me in the “Call to Action” 

Holic:

  • “No Party. When politicians reach across the aisle, they risk fighting in a tug of war, and that’s a scenario in which someone inevitably loses – more often than not, it’s the people those politicians serve.”
  • “No Politics. Candidate should be free from the influence of money.”
  • “Just Solving Problems. Candidates that are free of monetary and political influence are free to express a wider range of ideas without repercussion.”

Jain:

  • “Patient’s right to chose the doctor and not the insurance company. Doctor should be in charge to do the required tests for the diagnosis and treatment.”
  • “I want to fight for equal rights and justice for all specially small businesses and empower to stand up for your rights.”
  • “In the education system, teachers and parents should be incharge and curriculum should not be dictaed by the Govt.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



Florida Republican candidates have raised $196.5 million more than Democrats

In Florida, state-level candidates have raised $299.1 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Sept. 23, 2022. Democratic candidates have raised $45.3 million and Republican candidates have raised $241.8 million. 

Florida Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 9/23/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 9/23/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 257 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Florida Department of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have raised the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal Raised
1.Charlie Crist$26,052,415.01
2.Nicole Nikki Fried$3,761,974.97
3.Reggie Gaffney$648,442.00
4.Lauren Book$594,799.00
5.Loranne Ausley$546,592.33
6.Janet Cruz$534,980.09
7.Hillary Cassel$523,074.46
8.Allison Tant$423,238.22
9.Daryl Nevroy Campbell$406,091.22
10.Joy M Goff Marcil$386,272.68

Top 10 Republican candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 9/23/2022)

During the same time period, 273 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Florida Department of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported contribuions for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal Raised
1.Ron DeSantis$180,591,991.51
2.Wilton Simpson$10,389,500.05
3.Ashley Moody$9,065,596.45
4.Jimmy Patronis$1,890,433.44
5.Chad Chronister$1,133,337.00
6.Colleen Burton$1,115,367.22
7.Ed Hooper$1,103,787.55
8.Jason Fischer$824,671.19
9.Blaise Ingoglia$805,563.87
10.Jason Brodeur$715,497.40

In some states, officeholders may accept donations to their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those donations are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Florida candidate PACs submitted to the Florida Department of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Name of ReportReporting PeriodDeadline
2021 Q4 (2021 M12)10/1/2021 – 12/31/20211/10/2022
2022 Q1 (2022 M1,M2,M3)1/1/2022 – 3/31/20224/11/2022
2022 Primary 2 (M4, M5, Primary 1 & P2)4/1/2022 – 6/30/20227/8/2022
2022 General 1 (Primary 2, 2A, 3,4,5,6, P7 & General 1, G1A)7/1/2022 – 9/2/20229/9/2022
2022 General 3 (General 2,2A,3 & 3A)9/3/2022 – 9/30/202210/7/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual (General 4, 4A, 5 & Semiannual)10/1/2022 – 12/31/20221/10/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These are the most expensive contested elections in the Florida Senate

Elections for all 40 seats in the Florida State Senate will take place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans hold a 23-16 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five most expensive contested general elections in the State Senate.

This information comes from candidate reports to the Florida Department of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Sept. 23, 2022.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

#1 District 3 – $1,117,894

Incumbent Loranne Ausley (D) raised $546,592 and Corey Simon (R) raised $571,302.

#2 District 12 – $1,115,654

Colleen Burton (R) raised $1,108,117 and Veysel Dokur (D) raised $7,537.

#3 District 21 – $1,101,070

Incumbent Ed Hooper (R) raised $1,099,788 and Amaro Lionheart (D) raised $1,283.

#4 District 10 – $1,086,110

Incumbent Jason Brodeur (R) raised $715,497 and Joy Goff-Marcil (D) raised $370,613.

#5 District 14 – $897,705

Incumbent Janet Cruz (D) raised $534,980 and Jay Collins (R) raised $362,725.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Florida PACs submitted to the Florida Department of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Q4 Data (2021 M12) 1/10/2022
2022 M3 4/11/2022
2022 Primary 2 7/8/2022
2022 Primary 5 8/5/2022
2022 General 1 9/2/2022
2022 General 3 9/30/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These are the most expensive contested elections in the Florida House

Elections for all 120 seats in the Florida House of Representatives will take place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans hold a 76-42 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five most expensive contested general elections in the House of Representatives.

This information comes from candidate reports to the Florida Department of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Sept. 23, 2022.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

#1 District 38 – $790,727

Incumbent David Smith (R) raised $602,587 and Sarah Henry (D) raised $188,140.

#2 District 60 – $642,318

Audrey Henson (R) raised $375,812 and Lindsay Cross (D) raised $266,506.

#3 District 17 – $639,338

Jessica Baker (R) raised $639,338 and Michael Anderson (D) raised $0.

#4 District 120 – $627,423

Incumbent Jim Mooney (R) raised $515,412, Adam Gentle (D) raised $112,011, and Irene Alzerreca Calvo (N) raised $0.

#5 District 69 – $570,995

Incumbent Andrew Learned (D) raised $317,943 and Danny Alvarez (R) raised $253,051.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Florida PACs submitted to the Florida Department of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Q4 Data (2021 M12) 1/10/2022
2022 M3 4/11/2022
2022 Primary 2 7/8/2022
2022 Primary 5 8/5/2022
2022 General 1 9/2/2022
2022 General 3 9/30/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



All candidates for Florida House of Representatives District 40 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Florida House of Representatives District 40  — LaVon Bracy Davis (D) and Nate Robertson (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Florida’s state legislature. Florida is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?                        

Davis:       

  • “My economic development plan will work to: Curb prices and end the affordability crisis, increase opportunity by creating and attracting good jobs, and incentivize the vast amount of opportunities and resources of our district to organizations and companies to bring jobs to District 40.”
  • “As a member of the Board of Directors for Pace Center, an alternative education program that is funded through Orange County Public Schools I completely understand the importance of quality education and school choice for our future!”
  • “I am a strong believer that hate and its symbols have no place in our district or the State of Florida. There are a number of inquiries in our community and collectively we will tackle them!”

Robertson:       

  • “Educational Choice: Parents should have access to reliable, high quality education options for their children conveniently located to where they live. Nate desires to secure millions of dollars in funding to focus on new private and charter schools in District 40.”
  • “Personal Freedoms: All residents of District 40 and throughout Orange County and Florida should be able to make informed decisions for themselves and their families.” 
  • “Small Business Development: Businesses in District 40 need support from the State to thrive and when needed stabilize. New business growth is also a need for the district as well as a desire of many residents.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Florida House of Representatives elections, 2022



Florida Gov. DeSantis receives $166.5 million, with Republican Governors Association as top donor

Gov. Ron DeSantis is the top fundraiser in Florida state politics in the 2022 election cycle so far. According to campaign finance reports made to the Florida Secretary of State, the governor received $166,578,634 in total contributions and spent $42,429,904 between Jan. 1, 2021 and Sept. 2, 2022. DeSantis is running for re-election in 2022.

Gov. DeSantis is a member of the Republican Party and first assumed office in 2019.

Contributions to Gov. DeSantis

Of the $166.5 million already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 31.9 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Gov. DeSantis (1/1/2021 – 9/2/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor Name Donor Type
1.$17,350,000.00Republican Governors Association – FederalENTITY
2.$10,000,000.00Robert T BigelowINDIVIDUAL
3.$9,895,062.31Republican Party of FloridaENTITY
4.$5,093,175.47State of FloridaENTITY
5.$5,000,000.00Kenneth C GriffinINDIVIDUAL
6.$2,000,000.00Club for Growth PACENTITY
7.$1,250,000.00Walter W Buckley JrINDIVIDUAL
8.$1,000,000.00Seminole Tribe of FloridaENTITY
9.$900,000.00David F MacneilINDIVIDUAL
10.$750,000.00James A Bowen JrINDIVIDUAL

Expenditures by Gov. DeSantis

On the expenditures side, Gov. DeSantis reported over $42.4 million, with 83.9 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping the list. 

Top Expenditures by Gov. DeSantis (1/1/2021 – 9/2/2021)

RankTotal AmountPayee Name Payee Type
1.$18,490,273.86Republican Party of FloridaENTITY
2.$4,787,489.40Flexpoint Media IncENTITY
3.$4,099,826.00Blitz Canvassing LLCENTITY
4.$2,500,000.00Florida Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee, Inc.ENTITY
5.$1,858,441.39Ace Specialties LLCENTITY
6.$1,475,000.001visionENTITY
7.$911,327.73Anedot IncENTITY
8.$598,824.78Election Connections IncENTITY
9.$495,213.00The Lukens CompanyENTITY
10.$394,702.76Spectrum Monthly LLCENTITY

How Gov. DeSantis’s fundraising compares to other governors

Among elected officials holding the same level of state office, fundraising varies widely. A number of factors, including whether an incumbent officeholder is running for reelection, influence donor activity. Here is how fundraising by Gov. DeSantis compares to the 10 other governors with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Fundraising reported by 11 U.S. governors in the 2022 election cycle

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Florida PACs submitted to the Florida Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Name of ReportReporting PeriodDeadline
2021 Q4 (2021 M12)10/1/2021 – 12/31/20211/10/2022
2022 Q1 (2022 M1,M2,M3)1/1/2022 – 3/31/20224/11/2022
2022 Primary 2 (M4, M5, Primary 1 & P2)4/1/2022 – 6/30/20227/8/2022
2022 General 1 (Primary 2, 2A, 3,4,5,6, P7 & General 1, G1A)7/1/2022 – 9/2/20229/9/2022
2022 General 3 (General 2,2A,3 & 3A)9/3/2022 – 9/30/202210/7/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual (General 4, 4A, 5 & Semiannual)10/1/2022 – 12/31/20221/10/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.