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Stories about Indiana

These Indiana State Senate candidates raised the most money and lost

Elections for 25 of 50 seats in the Indiana State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 40-10 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates who raised the most money and lost their election. In the 2022 election cycle, 17 of 25 general elections were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

State Senate candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election

This information comes from candidate reports to the Indiana Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Oct. 24, 2022.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Alexander Choi – $441,584 – District 29 (Lost general 49% – 51%)
  • Jocelyn Vare – $266,438 – District 31 (Lost general 45% – 55%)
  • Michael Griffin – $95,853 – District 1 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Jeff Larson – $57,804 – District 4 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Ronald Itnyre – $55,068 – District 27 (Lost general 24% – 76%)

State Senate candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Indiana Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • John Ruckelshaus – $1,099,327 – District 30 (Lost general 47% – 53%)
  • Ashley Eason – $200,779 – District 36 (Lost general 46% – 54%)
  • Pete Cowden – $187,159 – District 35 (Lost general 42% – 58%)
  • Belinda Drake – $79,668 – District 32 (Lost general 41% – 59%)
  • Gary Davis – $51,384 – District 8 (Lost general 41% – 59%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These Indiana State House candidates raised the most money and lost

Elections for all 100 seats in the Indiana House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 70-30 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates who raised the most money and lost their election. In the 2022 election cycle, 59 of 100 general elections were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

House candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election

This information comes from candidate reports to the Indiana Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Oct. 24, 2022.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Scott Hawkins – $335,803 – District 71 (Lost general 49% – 51%)
  • Terri Austin – $244,049 – District 36 (Lost general 49% – 51%)
  • Heidi Beidinger – $213,063 – District 5 (Lost general 43% – 57%)
  • Matt McNally – $195,900 – District 39 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Fred Glynn – $155,534 – District 32 (Lost general 50% – 50%)

House candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Indiana Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Cindy Kirchhofer – $653,343 – District 89 (Lost general 49% – 51%)
  • Ashley Klein – $408,317 – District 39 (Lost general 46% – 54%)
  • Aimee Cole – $268,274 – District 37 (Lost general 44% – 56%)
  • Donald Westerhausen Jr. – $257,417 – District 5 (Lost general 49% – 51%)
  • Melanie Wright – $251,209 – District 35 (Lost general 45% – 55%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Eleven of 19 Indiana State Senate committee chairs raised less money than the average member this cycle

Elections for 25 of 50 seats in the Indiana State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 40-10 majority heading into the election.

Committee chair fundraising

State legislative committee chairs set a committee’s legislative agenda. Some committee chairs raise significantly more money than their non-chair counterparts in the state legislature. The average amount raised by delegates who did not serve as a committee chair was $189,943. The funds raised by each of the State Senate’s 19 committee chairs are shown below.

  • Agriculture Committee – Jean Leising – $38,331
  • Appropriations Committee – Ryan Mishler – $0
  • Commerce and Technology Committee – Chip Perfect – $40,492
  • Corrections and Criminal Law Committee – Michael Young – $18,417
  • Education and Career Development Committee – Jeff Raatz – $172,648
  • Elections Committee – Jon Ford – $219,375
  • Ethics Committee – Greg Walker – $28,000
  • Health and Provider Services Committee – Ed Charbonneau – $48,300
  • Homeland Security and Transportation Committee – Michael Crider – $40,000
  • Insurance and Financial Institutions Committee – Andy Zay – $270,101
  • Rules and Legislative Procedure Committee – Rodric D. Bray – $301,760
  • Senate Environmental Affairs Committee – Mark Messmer – $586,174
  • Senate Joint Rules Committee – Mark Messmer – $586,174
  • Senate Judiciary Committee – Liz Brown – $102,754
  • Senate Local Government Committee – James Buck – $168,239
  • Senate Natural Resources Committee – Susan Glick – $0
  • Senate Public Policy Committee – Ronnie Alting – $276,058
  • Tax and Fiscal Policy Committee – Travis Holdman – $249,520
  • Utilities Committee – Eric Koch – $67,309
  • Veterans Affairs and the Military Committee – Jim Tomes – $67,038

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Ten of 16 Indiana House committee chairs raised more money than the average member this cycle

Elections for all 100 seats in the Indiana House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 70-30 majority heading into the election.

Committee chair fundraising

State legislative committee chairs set a committee’s legislative agenda. Some committee chairs raise significantly more money than their non-chair counterparts in the state legislature. The average amount raised by delegates who did not serve as a committee chair was $106,925. The funds raised by each of the House’s 16 committee chairs are shown below.

  • Commerce, Small Business and Economic Development Committee – Bob Morris – $52,600
  • Courts and Criminal Code Committee – Wendy McNamara – $170,539
  • Education Committee – Robert Behning – $199,361
  • Elections and Apportionment Committee – Timothy Wesco – $46,902
  • Employment, Labor and Pensions Committee – Heath VanNatter – $73,871
  • Family, Children and Human Affairs Committee – Dale DeVon – $298,595
  • Financial Institutions and Insurance Committee – Martin Carbaugh – $380,177
  • Government and Regulatory Reform Committee – Doug Miller – $57,487
  • House Joint Rules Committee – Todd Huston – $1,388,175
  • House Judiciary Committee – Gerald Torr – $244,192
  • House Local Government Committee – Dennis Zent – $55,455
  • House Public Policy Committee – Ben Smaltz – $100,850
  • Public Health Committee – Bradford Barrett – $160,533
  • Roads and Transportation Committee – Jim Pressel – $176,270
  • Utilities, Energy and Telecommunications Committee – Edmond Soliday – $124,356
  • Veterans Affairs and Public Safety Committee – Randy Frye – $187,807

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These are the results in the top five most expensive Indiana State Senate elections

General elections for 25 of 50 districts in the Indiana State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Of the 25 districts up for election in 2022, 17 had a general election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested general elections, candidates raised $6.8 million. Incumbents raised an average of $361,918 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $100,125 per candidate.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five general elections with the most fundraising in the State Senate. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 31 $1,805,803 Kyle Walker (R) Kyle Walker and Jocelyn Vare
District 29 $793,505 J.D. Ford (D) J.D. Ford and Alexander Choi
District 48 $588,346 Mark Messmer (R) Mark Messmer and Jeff Hill
District 11 $565,172 Linda Rogers (R) Linda Rogers and Melinda Fountain
District 45 $525,916 Chris Garten (R) Chris Garten and Nick Marshall

The officeholders above are listed for the current districts they hold. However, this is a redistricting year, so candidates have been identified below as incumbents even if they are running in a different district than they currently hold.

#1 District 31 – $1,805,803

Incumbent Kyle Walker raised $1,539,365 and Jocelyn Vare raised $266,438.

Kyle Walker won with 55 percent of the vote and Jocelyn Vare received 45 percent of the vote.

#2 District 29 – $793,505

Incumbent J.D. Ford raised $351,921 and Alexander Choi raised $441,584.

J.D. Ford won with 51 percent of the vote and Alexander Choi received 49 percent of the vote.

#3 District 48 – $588,346

Incumbent Mark Messmer raised $586,174 and Jeff Hill raised $2,172.

Mark Messmer won with 72 percent of the vote and Jeff Hill received 28 percent of the vote.

#4 District 11 – $565,172

Incumbent Linda Rogers raised $542,383 and Melinda Fountain raised $22,789.

Linda Rogers won with 62 percent of the vote and Melinda Fountain received 38 percent of the vote.

#5 District 45 – $525,916

Incumbent Chris Garten raised $511,666 and Nick Marshall raised $14,251.

Chris Garten won with 63 percent of the vote and Nick Marshall received 37 percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These are the results in the top five most expensive Indiana State House elections

General elections for all 100 districts in the Indiana House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Of the 100 districts up for election in 2022, 59 had a general election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested general elections, candidates raised $9.5 million. Incumbents raised an average of $121,095 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $47,691 per candidate.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five general elections with the most fundraising in the House of Representatives. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 93 $695,082 Julie McGuire (R) Julie McGuire, Andy Miller, and Karl Knable
District 71 $591,303 Rita Fleming (D) Rita Fleming and Scott Hawkins
District 22 $523,035 Craig Snow (R) Craig Snow, Dee Moore, and Josh Vergiels
District 5 $511,658 Dale DeVon (R) Dale DeVon and Heidi Beidinger
District 36 $465,259 Kyle Pierce (R) Kyle Pierce and Terri Austin

The officeholders above are listed for the current districts they hold. However, this is a redistricting year, so candidates have been identified below as incumbents even if they are running in a different district than they currently hold.

#1 District 93 – $695,082

Julie McGuire raised $675,374, Andy Miller raised $14,708, and Karl Knable raised $5,000.

Julie McGuire won with 58 percent of the vote, Andy Miller received 36 percent of the vote, and Karl Knable received 6 percent of the vote.

#2 District 71 – $591,303

Incumbent Rita Fleming raised $255,500 and Scott Hawkins raised $335,803.

Rita Fleming won with 51 percent of the vote and Scott Hawkins received 49 percent of the vote.

#3 District 22 – $523,035

Incumbent Craig Snow raised $517,601, Josh Vergiels raised $2,780, and Dee Moore raised $2,654.

Craig Snow won with 79 percent of the vote, Dee Moore received 16 percent of the vote, and Josh Vergiels received 4 percent of the vote.

#4 District 5 – $511,658

Incumbent Dale DeVon raised $298,595 and Heidi Beidinger raised $213,063.

Dale DeVon won with 57 percent of the vote and Heidi Beidinger received 43 percent of the vote.

#5 District 36 – $465,259

Incumbent Terri Austin raised $244,049 and Kyle Pierce raised $221,210.

Kyle Pierce won with 51 percent of the vote and Terri Austin received 49 percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Indiana Republican candidates have spent $15.5 million more than Democrats

In Indiana, state-level candidates have spent $25.9 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 24, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $4.7 million and Republican candidates have spent $20.2 million. 

Indiana Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/24/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/24/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 151 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Indiana Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Destiny Scott Wells$485,075.18
2.Woodrow Myers$404,907.01
3.Philip Kelly GiaQuinta$295,538.03
4.James David Ford$271,591.04
5.Ted Connor$199,950.98
6.Mitchell Gore$152,970.39
7.Terri Austin$137,185.68
8.Heidi Beidinger$130,100.23
9.Fady Qaddoura$125,893.02
10.Kristin Jones$120,295.05

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/24/2022)

During the same time period, 223 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Indiana Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Eric Holcomb$1,593,815.63
2.Todd Huston$1,104,480.47
3.Kyle Walker$1,079,613.94
4.Diego Morales$904,681.88
5.Julie McGuire$647,738.76
6.Todd Rokita$547,927.37
7.Holli Sullivan$535,074.16
8.Mark Messmer$476,990.12
9.Craig Snow$471,172.76
10.Tera Klutz$460,841.91

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana candidate PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

StateReport NameDue Date
IN2022 Jan Semiannual1/19/2022
IN2022 Statewide Quarterly/Semiannual7/15/2022
IN2022 Pre-Election10/17/2022
IN2022 Statewide Quarterly11/1/2022
IN2022 Annual Report1/18/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



All candidates for Indiana State Senate District 23 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Indiana State Senate District 23 — David Sanders (D) and Spencer Deery (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Indiana’s state legislature. Indiana is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Sanders:           

  • “Commitment to ethics.”
  • “Commitment to privacy.”
  • “Commitment to serving the public.”

Deery:           

  • “Fighting the pain of inflation with smart fiscal policies.
  • “Strengthening our education system at every level.”
  • “Maintaining safe communities.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Indiana State Senate elections, 2022



All candidates for Indiana House of Representatives District 89 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Indiana House of Representatives District 89 — incumbent Mitch Gore (D) and Michael-Paul Hart (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Indiana’s state legislature. Indiana is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Gore:           

“In addition to the key messages of our campaign of mental health and addiction treatment, public safety, and reproductive freedom, I’m also passionate about Hoosiers’ health where my voting record shows I am committed to expanding affordable healthcare, including reigning in the outrageous costs of prescription medicines, especially for my neighbors on fixed incomes.”

Hart:           

“The areas of public policy that are of personal passion are the ones that directly impact Hoosiers and their everyday life the most. It’s their community’s safety, children’s education, and the cost of their health care. It’s also how much of their paycheck they keep and ensuring their property taxes don’t go through the roof every assessment.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Indiana House of Representatives elections, 2022



Campaign finance deadline today in Indiana

Candidates and organizations involved in Indiana’s statewide elections must file campaign finance information by November 1, 2022. The general election will take place in Indiana on November 8, 2022.

What state-level offices are on the ballot this year in Indiana?

Want to review the campaign finance data in Indiana so far? Click here to explore the data on Transparency USA.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.