Taglocal elections

All candidates for Mesa City Council, Arizona, District 4 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Mesa City Council, Arizona, District 4  — incumbent Jenn Duff and Trista Guzman Glover — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The Mesa City Council is the city’s primary legislative body. It is responsible for approving and adopting the city budget, levying taxes, and making or amending city laws, policies, and ordinances. The city council is made up of seven members, including the mayor. While the mayor is elected at large, the other six members are elected by the city’s six districts.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Duff:           

  • “Investing in our Public Safety personnel and Infrastructure” 
  • “Water Sustainability – Conservation, efficiency and infrastructure to maximize water treatment for reuse.”
  • “Housing – As Mesa’s economy grows, we must work to provide housing choices for residents of all income levels and at all stages of life.”

Guzman Glover:                   

  • “Community-Centered”
  • “Public Safety-Focused”
  • “Business-Friendly Mesa”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Platte County Commission Presiding Commissioner complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Platte County Commission Presiding Commissioner — John DeFoor (D) and Scott Fricker (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The Kansas City Beacon’s Josh Merchant wrote, “the Platte County Commission serves as the central governing body for the county. […] The three members of the commission include the presiding commissioner, as well as representatives from two districts.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

DeFoor:

  • “I am a strong supporter of small businesses and believe that the success of small business is important to our community and the people that depend on them.”
  • “I believe that government transparency is important as we are seeing a lot of backdoor deals and things being done out of sight of the citizens that the official were elected to serve. To properly serve our citizens we need to involve and inform them of the solutions to the issues that effect them their tax dollars and their daily lives.”
  • “I believe that government transparency is important to properly serve our citizens we need to involve and inform them of the solutions to the issues that effect them their tax dollars and their daily lives.”

Fricker:       

  • “Platte County is the fastest growing county in Missouri, so we need a Presiding Commissioner with a track record of success in the private sector and a demonstrated commitment to public service.” 
  • “Throughout this campaign and during my four-year term as Presiding Commissioner, I’ll focus on the three conservative principles of Public Safety, Economic Prosperity, and Fiscal Responsibility.”
  • “Vote for me in November, and then let’s work together to make sure Platte County is a great place to live, work, and raise a family for years to come.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Marion County, Indiana, County Recorder complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Marion County, Indiana, County Recorder — Faith James Kimbrough (D) and Barcia Alejos (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

According to the Marion County website, the county recorder “maintains permanent public records of property transactions between owners and makes those documents available to the public. Records include deeds, liens, mortgages, easements, certified survey maps, and more.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Kimbrough:               

“As it relates to public policy I am most passionate about gentrification. Gentrification is a highly contested issue. Currently, Gentrification has the power to displace low-income families and prevent those families from moving into previously affordable neighborhoods. As the next Marion County Recorder, I want to make sure all deeds that have been digitized are indexed so residents can easily find their land documents. I want low-income families to have access to their deeds before they are displaced.”

Alejos:           

“As a constitutionally mandated office, the Marion County Recorder is charged with ensuring property rights of the citizens are protected. Our country’s founding fathers understood the importance of private property as a foundational principle in The Constitution, not only to cultivate a society of prosperity but of freedom itself. Therefore by way of common law and state law, the implementation and execution that these fundamental rights be clear and readily available for all citizens is entrusted to the office of County Recorder.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Marion County, Indiana, County Clerk complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Marion County, Indiana, County Clerk —  Kate Sweeney Bell (D) and Andrew Harrison (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

According to Marion County’s website, the County Clerk “records and files public records, vital records, and court records, including child support payments. The office also receives nominations and petitions for elections, as well as prepares ballots, maintains voting machines, and recruits and trains seasonal poll workers.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Bell:               

“Protecting voting rights and ensuring fair elections.”

Harrison:           

“Bi-partisian partnership building and decision making. Helping others. Ensuring secure elections. Being accessible to Hoosiers.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Seattle voters to decide on whether to adopt approval voting or ranked-choice voting for city primary elections

In November, Seattle voters will vote on Proposition 1A and 1B to decide whether to adopt an approval voting system or a ranked-choice voting system for municipal primary elections. Currently, Seattle uses a plurality voting system for primary elections for the mayor, city attorney, and city council, in which the candidate receiving the most votes advances to the general election. This system is sometimes referred to as first-past-the-post or winner-take-all and is the most common voting system used in the United States.

The group Seattle Approves collected enough valid signatures for Initiative 134, which would establish an approval voting system for Seattle primary elections. The Seattle City Council could pass the initiative as an ordinance, reject it, send it to voters, or send it to voters along with an alternative proposal.

On July 14, the Seattle City Council voted 7-2 to reject Initiative 134 and adopt a ranked-choice voting system instead. Councilmember Andrew Lewis sponsored a resolution to place the ranked-choice voting alternative proposal on the ballot along with Initiative 134’s approval voting proposal. Lewis said, “This discussion has gotten to a point where we run a risk of making a more undemocratic decision by depriving the voters of making that choice [between approval voting and ranked-choice voting]. In essence, there would be a proxy vote where voting ‘No’ on approval voting would be reflecting a ‘Yes’ vote for [ranked-choice voting] anyway.”

Voters will first decide on Question 1, asking whether either of the two proposed voting systems should be adopted. Voters would then decide on Question 2 to choose between Proposition 1A (Initiative 134) for approval voting or Proposition 1B (City Ordinance 126625) for ranked-choice voting. Voters opposed to adopting a new voting system who vote ‘no’ on Question 1 can still vote for their preferred option in Question 2. If the first question is approved by a majority of voters, the option receiving the highest number of votes would be adopted.

Voting for Proposition 1A would implement Initiative 134, which would establish approval voting for Seattle primary elections for mayor, city attorney, and city council. Under the approval voting system, voters would vote for however many candidates they choose. The primary ballot would include instructions stating, “vote for AS MANY as you approve of” for each office. The top two candidates receiving the most votes would advance to the general election.

Logan Bowers, volunteer co-chair of Seattle Approves, said, “If you’ve ever debated between voting for a candidate that you really like and another you like less but has the big money backing to win, you’ve experienced the problem with our existing elections. The money flowing into elections combined with the flaws in our current voting system means our elections aren’t a fair assessment of what voters want. Too often, voters feel compelled to vote strategically based on who they think can win.”

Voting for Proposition 1B would implement the city council’s proposed alternative measure, which would establish ranked-choice voting for Seattle primary elections for mayor, city attorney, and city council. Under the ranked-choice voting system, voters would rank candidates according to their preferences. The candidates with the fewest votes would be eliminated and the voters’ second choice would be counted for the remaining candidates until two candidates remain to advance to the general election. Voters would be able to rank up to five candidates. Ballots would include instructions stating, “Rank candidates in the order of your choice.”

Lisa Ayrault, director of FairVote Washington, said, “We think it would be an unfortunate choice for Seattle to go in that direction (of approval voting), when ranked-choice voting has such a proven track record of success. Where people tend to have strong preferences about their first choices and care a lot about the outcomes … ranked-choice voting is the best.”



Voters approve Nebraska county supervisor recall election

A recall election against Doris Karloff (R), District 2 representative of the seven-member Saunders County Board of Supervisors in Nebraska, was held on Dec. 14. A majority of voters cast ballots in favor of the recall to remove Karloff from office.

The recall effort was started by Rhonda Carritt, a resident of Wahoo, Nebraska, which is represented by Karloff on the county board of supervisors. Carritt said Karloff was not representing “the best interests of the district.” Carritt confirmed with the Wahoo Newspaper that the recall was related to a solar farm project in the county among other things.

Karloff’s son went into contract with the company starting the solar farm. Because of that connection, Karloff said she abstained from all discussions on the permit and did not vote on any actions related to the solar farm. “I have tried to do my best to make sure that I was doing everything legally correct,” Karloff said.

To get the recall on the ballot, recall supporters had to collect 573 signatures in 30 days. Recall supporters submitted the signatures by the deadline, and the county verified 581 signatures, allowing the recall to be put on the ballot.

Karloff won re-election to a four-year term in the general election on Nov. 3, 2020. She defeated three other Republicans in the primary on May 12, and she ran uncontested in the general election.

In the first half of 2021, Ballotpedia tracked 165 recall efforts against 263 officials. This was the most recall efforts for this point in the year since the first half of 2016, when we tracked 189 recall efforts against 265 officials. In comparison, we tracked between 72 and 155 efforts by the midpoints of 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020.

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Pillsbury wins Dover City Council special election

The city of Dover, D.E., held a nonpartisan special election for District 1 on the city council on Nov. 16. The filing deadline for this election was Nov. 1.

Julia Pillsbury defeated Brandy Walker in the special election with 53.5% of the vote. According to unofficial results, Pillsbury received 272 votes to Walker’s 236. The special election was called after Matthew Lindell resigned from his seat on the nine-seat city council after deciding to move from the district. Lindell served from 2017 to 2021.

Dover is the capital city of Delaware and the second-largest city in the state. It had an estimated population of 39,403 in 2020, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Ballotpedia covers elections for mayor, city council, and district attorney in all capital cities in the U.S.

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Election results in Clallam County, Wa.

The cities of Port Angeles, Sequim, and Forks, in Clallam County, Wa., held general elections for 26 municipal offices on Nov. 2. The primaries were held Aug. 3. The top two vote-getters in each race advanced to the general election. Races in which fewer than three candidates filed to run appeared only on the general election ballot.

Results of the races are pending. The Clallam County Auditor’s office releases updated vote totals on a daily basis until all ballots are counted. As of Nov. 5, the Auditor’s office estimated it had 50 ballots left to count and that it had counted a total of 27,045 ballots. Voter turnout was 47.31%.

Clallam County is located in the northwestern corner of Washington, on the Olympic Peninsula. It has the nation’s longest unbroken record of voting for the winning presidential candidate, going back to 1980. Since 1920, voters in the county backed the winning presidential candidate in every election except 1968 and 1976. 

Port Angeles

Port Angeles, the county seat, had eight offices up for election in 2021, including four city council seats and two seats on the school board. Six of those races were contested and two were uncontested. 

Incumbents were on the ballot in seven of the eight races, including in all four city council races. As of Nov. 5, all incumbents look to have won re-election. In two city council races, the margins separating the candidates are below 5% but the incumbents are leading in votes. 

Here are the results:

  • City Council Position No. 1: Incumbent LaTrisha Suggs faced challenger Adam Garcia. As of Nov. 5, Suggs leads Garcia by 2.54% (159 votes).
  • City Council Position No. 2: Incumbent Mike French defeated challenger John Madden, winning 58.92% of the vote to Madden’s 40.82%.
  • City Council Position No. 3: Incumbent Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin ran for re-election against challenger Jena Stamper. As of Nov. 5, Schromen-Wawrin leads Stamper by 1.87% (117 votes).
  • City Council Position No. 4: Incumbent Kate Dexter defeated challenger John W. Procter, winning 53.43% of the vote to Procter’s 46.28%.
  • School District Director Position No. 1: Incumbent Sarah Methner defeated challenger Lola Moses, winning 54.23% of the vote to Moses’ 44.97%.
  • School District Director Position No. 2: Mary Herbert defeated Gabi Johnson. Herbert won 56.98% of the vote to Johnson’s 42.64%.

Two seats up for election in Port Angeles in 2021 were uncontested: Port of Port Angeles Commissioner District No. 1 and Port of Port Angeles Commissioner District No. 2. Only the incumbents—Colleen McAleer and Steven Burke—filed to run. They were re-elected.

Sequim

Sequim had eleven offices up for election, including five of seven city council seats. Seven of those races were contested.

Incumbents appeared on the ballot in eight races, including in all five city council races. Five incumbents won re-election. Incumbents lost in three of the five city council races. 

  • City Council Position No. 2: Challenger Kathy Downer defeated incumbent Sarah Kincaid, winning 69.61% of the vote to Kincaid’s 30.23%
  • City Council Position No. 3: Challenger Vicki L. Lowe defeated incumbent Mike Pence. She won 68.17% of the vote to Pence’s 31.71%.
  • City Council Position No. 4: Incumbent Rachel Anderson defeated challenger Daryl Ness, winning 67.63% of the vote to Ness’ 32.25%.
  • City Council Position No. 5: incumbent Brandon Janisse defeated challenger Patrick Day, winning 65.86% of the vote to Day’s 33.86%.
  • City Council Position No. 6: Lowell Rathbun defeated incumbent Keith A. Larkin. Rathbun won 65.28% of the vote to Larkin’s 34.57%.
  • School District Director at Large, Position No. 4: Kristi Schmeck defeated Virginia R. Sheppard. This race is a multi-county race that includes both Clallam County and Jefferson County. Schmeck won 55.93% of the overall vote, while Sheppard won 42.72%.
  • Fire District #3, Commissioner Position No. 1: Jeff Nicholas defeated Duane Chamlee. This race is a multi-county race that includes both Clallam County and Jefferson County. Nicholas won 64.78% of the overall vote, compared to Chamlee’s 34.82%.

Four races in Sequim were uncontested. The Sequim School District Director District No. 2 was the only one that didn’t feature an incumbent. Patrice Johnston was elected to that seat. In the other uncontested races—Park and Recreation Commissioner Position No. 1, Park and Recreation Commissioner Position No. 2, and Sunland Water District Commissioner Position No. 3—the incumbents won re-election. Those incumbents are Ray L. Henninger, Frank Pickering, and Alan Frank, respectively.

Forks

Seven offices were up for election in Forks. Three of those races were contested.

Incumbents appeared on the ballot in six races, two of which were contested. All incumbents won re-election in Forks. 

  • Forks City Council Position No. 2: Clinton W. Wood defeated Josef Echeita, winning 65.98% of the vote. Echeita won 33.86%.
  • Forks City Council Position No. 3: Incumbent Joe Soha defeated challenger Sarah Holmes. Soha won 66.99% of the vote to Holmes’ 32.03%.
  • Forks Mayor: Incumbent Tim Fletcher defeated challenger Steve Wright, winning 84.6% of the vote to Wright’s 12.7%.

Four races in Forks were uncontested—Quillayute Valley School District Director District No. 2, Quillayute Valley School District Director District No. 4, Quillayute Park and Recreation Board Commissioner Position No. 1, and Fire District #6 Position No. 3. The incumbents—Kevin Hinchen, Ron Hurn, Donald Grafstrom, and Tom Rosmond, respectively—won re-election.

To read more about elections in Clallam County, including analyses of the county’s presidential and statewide voting record, click here.



Bibb wins Cleveland mayoral race

Justin Bibb (D) defeated City Council President Kevin Kelley (D), to win the mayoral election in Cleveland, Ohio. This was the first mayoral election in Cleveland without an incumbent on the ballot since 2001.

Bibb, who is 34, will become the second-youngest mayor in Cleveland’s history. Describing his campaign, Bibb said, “now is the time for bold, new, dynamic, visionary leadership and not the failed politics and policies of the past.” Kelley, who has served on the city council since 2005, highlighted his experience, saying, “Every candidate will talk about change. The question is: who knows how to and who has a record of making change?”

Bibb’s victory marks the first time since the 1962 election of Ralph Locher (D) where Clevelanders have elected a mayor with no prior electoral experience.

Bibb received endorsements from former mayors Jane Campbell (D) and Michael White (D), who served from 2002 to 2006 and 1990 to 2002, respectively. He also received endorsements from Our Revolution Ohio and U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D).

Seventeen of the 100 largest U.S. cities by population held general elections for mayor on Nov. 2. In total, 28 top-100 cities are electing mayors in 2021. Heading into election day, 63 top-100 mayors were affiliated with the Democratic Party, 26 were affiliated with the Republican Party, four are independents, six identify as nonpartisan or unaffiliated, and one mayor has not responded to inquiries about his partisan affiliation.

Additional reading:

https://ballotpedia.org/Partisanship_in_United_States_municipal_elections_(2021)



Where things stand in Seattle’s elections

Seattle, Washington, held elections for mayor, two at-large city council seats, and city attorney on Nov. 2. Ballots needed to be postmarked by that day to be counted in the election. King County Elections will continue counting ballots until results are certified on Nov. 23.

The following are preliminary results reported on election night.

Mayor

  1. Bruce Harrell: 65%
  2. Lorena González: 35%

City Council Position 8

  1. Teresa Mosqueda (incumbent): 53%
  2. Kenneth Wilson: 47%

City Council Position 9

  1. Sara Nelson: 60%
  2. Nikkita Oliver: 40%

City Attorney

  1. Ann Davison: 58.7%
  2. Nicole Thomas-Kennedy: 41.3%

According to The Seattle Times, “In Seattle races, ballots that arrive and are tallied later tend to favor left-lane candidates. In their crowded Aug. 3 primary, Harrell’s nine point lead over González on election night narrowed to less than two points by the time all of the votes were tabulated.”

Additional reading:

https://ballotpedia.org/City_attorney_election_in_Seattle,_Washington_(2021)

https://ballotpedia.org/City_council_elections_in_Seattle,_Washington_(2021)

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/bruce-harrell-is-leading-m-lorena-gonzalez-in-seattle-mayor-race/