Taglocal elections

Election preview: Madison, Wisconsin

The primary for Madison, Wisconsin is on Feb. 21, 2023. Candidates are competing to advance to the general election scheduled for April 4. The filing deadline to run was on Jan. 3.

Candidates filed for Madison Common Council Districts 1-20. The primaries for districts 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19 were canceled after fewer than three candidates filed for each election. 

Candidates also filed for mayor of Madison. Incumbent Satya Rhodes-Conway, Scott Kerr, and Gloria Reyes are running in the nonpartisan primary. While most mayoral elections in the 100 largest cities are nonpartisan, most officeholders are affiliated with a political party. Madison has a Democratic mayor. As of February 2023, 62 mayors in the largest 100 cities by population are affiliated with the Democratic Party, 26 are affiliated with the Republican Party, three are independents, seven identify as nonpartisan or unaffiliated, and two mayors’ affiliations are unknown.

Madison is the second-largest city in Wisconsin and the 79th-largest city in the U.S. by population.

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Eight candidates running for mayor of Jacksonville, Florida

Eight candidates are running in the general election for mayor of Jacksonville, Florida, on March 21, 2023. All candidates run in the general election regardless of party affiliation. If no candidate receives a majority of votes in the general, the top two vote-getters will advance to a runoff on May 16, 2023.

Donna Deegan (D), Audrey Gibson (D), LeAnna Cumber (R), Daniel Davis (R), and Al Ferraro (R) have led the field in media coverage and fundraising. Incumbent Mayor Lenny Curry (R) is term-limited and cannot run for re-election.

The Florida Times-Union’s Nate Monroe wrote that Jacksonville’s mayoral election system is “a recipe that complicates conventional electoral math and can lead to surprises, and it makes larger fields with multiple viable candidates, as this year appears to feature, difficult to handicap.”

Deegan and Gibson are the only two Democrats who filed to run. Deegan is a philanthropist, author, and local television news anchor. Gibson represented Jacksonville in the Florida State Senate from 2016 to 2022, after serving in the Florida House of Representatives from 2002 to 2010.

Cumber, Davis, and Ferarro represent three of the four Republicans who filed to run. Cumber is a business owner and member of the Jacksonville City Council, representing District 5. Davis is the chief executive officer of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce and a former member of the Florida House of Representatives. Ferraro is a business owner and member of the Jacksonville City Council, representing District 2.

Frank Keasler (R), Omega Allen (I), and write-in candidate Brian Griffin (I) are also running.

Jacksonville has had a Republican mayor since Curry was first elected in 2015, making it the most populous American city represented by a Republican mayor. In 2015, Curry defeated then-incumbent Alvin Brown (D) 51% to 49% in the May runoff election. The 2019 mayoral election was decided in the March general election, with Curry receiving 58% of the vote over Anna Lopez Brosche’s (R) 24%, Omega Allen’s (I) 11%, and Jimmy Hill’s (R) 8%.

As of January 2023, the partisan breakdown of the mayors of the 100 largest U.S. cities was 62 Democrats, 26 Republicans, three independents, and seven nonpartisans. Two mayors’ partisan affiliations were unknown. Based on 2020 population estimates, 76.1% of the population of the top 100 cities lived in cities with Democratic mayors, and 16.23% lived in cities with Republican mayors at the start of 2022.



All candidates for Wake County Board of Commissioners District 3 in North Carolina complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Wake County Board of Commissioners District 3 in North Carolina — Cheryl Stallings (D) and Irina Comer (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The county commission functions as the county’s primary legislative and policy-making body. County commissioners are tasked with approving the annual budget and setting the property tax rate, enacting ordinances, and regulating zoning and land use. Wake County has seven commissioners who are elected by district. 

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Stallings:           

  • “A healthy and sustainable economy for the people of Wake County. This incudes continued work in Economic Developement as we work to bring good jobs for diverse skill sets throughout the County.”
  • “A healthy and sustainable community for all. This includes working to support a robust system of public schools, public health and mental health services, housing affordability, and safe communities.”
  • “A healthy and sustainable environment for all. This includes staying on track with the County’s renewable energy goals; continued work in preserving and maintaining our open spaces/green spaces, parks/greenways, and family farms; and staying on track with our long range public transportation goals (which include expanded bus services, bus rapid transit, and commuter rail).”

Comer:

  • “Lower taxes. The current Commissioners aim to maximize revenue through taxes and then look for things to spend it on. That approach leads to inefficient government services and a very high tax burden for working families.”
  • “School choice. The Wake County Public School System used to be one of the envies of the country. However, enrollment continues to decline and quality continues to suffer. I believe public education needs competition like any other venture.”
  • “Public safety. Wake County residents deserve to live and work in a community that is safe for them and their families. While I believe firmly in limited government, I also believe that public safety is a core responsibility of county government through which order is enforced and individual rights are respected.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Wake County School Board District 1 in North Carolina complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Wake County School Board District 1 in North Carolina — Cheryl Caulfield andBen Clapsaddle — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

According to the Wake County county public school system website, the school board is made up of nine members who “set policy for the school system implemented by the superintendent and administrative staff. The board also adopts an annual budget proposal that includes its request for local funding from the Wake County Board of Commissioners as well as its plan for using state and federal funds.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Caulfield:        

  • “Teachers need our support. That starts with understanding the real issues, what they need and how to get it. First, we need to listen to our teachers. We pay $100,000’s to consultants, yet teachers are our front-line, and they know what works in the classroom.”
  • “WCPSS needs to focus on our learning loss recovery, and get back to basics; remove the politics in the classroom, and focus on reading, writing, and arithmetic.”
  • “Fiscal responsibility is imperative. We budget for million of dollars on textbooks, but our children do not have textbooks. While our superintendent is the highest paid in the nation, our teachers sit at the low end of the national pay.”

Clapsaddle:

  • “Supporting Teachers and Staff: I will always respect the concerns of our educators, teaching assistants, specialists, support staff, and administrators. They are professionals and deserve a strong support system, continuing professional development, and competitive pay.”
  • “Parental Involvement and Partnership: I want to partner with parents to make sure their needs and concerns are heard and addressed. I believe a school system works best when parents are involved in the policies concerning their children.”
  • “Fair Budgeting I believe in being fiscally responsible, with an openness towards community concerns, and effective resourcing for all Wake County Public Schools.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for St. Louis Board of Aldermen President in Missouri complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for St. Louis Board of Aldermen President in Missouri — John Coatar and Megan Ellyia Green — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the St. Louis website, the Board of Aldermen “is the legislative body of the City of St. Louis and creates, passes, and amends local laws, as well as approve the City’s budget every year. There are twenty-eight aldermen, one from each ward in the City and a President.” 

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about? 

Coatar:           

“I am interested in keeping the City of St. Louis safe, ensuring that quality city services work for all, supporting organized labor and working families, improving the infrastructure of the City, promoting responsible development, and building meaningful and effective coalitions throughout the city. “

Green:               

“I am passionate about about policy that builds a Saint Louis for all. Economic policy that produces a Saint Louis where workers are paid what they deserve, where worker’s right to have a union is protected, have protected. Policy that ensures our children have high quality and affordable education from an early age, where parents don’t have to pay a mortgage or forego basic necessities to cover the cost of childcare.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Cook County Commissioner District 13 in Illinois complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Cook County Commissioner District 13 in Illinois — Josina Morita (D) and Andrew Border (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The board of commissioners functions as the county’s primary legislative and policy-making body. Most boards also control county land usage, oversee environmental issues and possess executive powers, meaning they have the authority to appoint or remove departmental heads. Cook County has 17 commissioners who are elected by district to four-year terms. In addition to the 17 commissioners, there is a president of the board of commissioners who serves as the chief executive officer of Cook County.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office? 

Morita:       

  • “I am running for Cook County Board to make Cook County more equitable, accessible and sustainable.”
  • “I am a working mom, urban planner, and community advocate.”
  • “I will be the first Asian American woman elected to the Cook County Board.”

Border:       

  • “GOVERNMENT REFORM: Repeal the June 2022 Cook County public official pay increase. Push anti-corruption reforms outlined by the Independent Voters of Illinois.”
  • “TAX RELIEF: No new taxes, no tax increases. Hold the Cook County Cook County Assessor Office accountable issuing accurate property taxes issued in a timely and consistent matter.”
  • “PUBLIC SAFTEY MANAGEMENT: Demand transparency and real-time data on offenders who are on electronic monitoring.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for El Paso County Commissioner District 1 in Colorado complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for El Paso County Commissioner District 1 in Colorado — incumbent Holly Williams (R) and Ryan Lucas (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The board of supervisors functions as the county’s primary legislative and policy-making body. Most boards also control county land usage, oversee environmental issues, and possess executive powers, meaning they have the authority to appoint or remove departmental heads. El Paso County has five supervisors who are elected by district to four-year terms.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?  

Williams:

“Our most pressing infrastructure need is our road infrastructure including improvements to major arterials and neighborhood roads. Additionally, road safety and driver speeding has increased the need for additional law enforcement.”

Lucas:       

  • “Public transit.”
  • “Public Health.”
  • “Public financing of elections.”
  • “Transparency of public office.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Water Replenishment District of Southern California District 4 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Water Replenishment District of Southern California District 4 — incumbent Sergio Calderon and Jose Gonzalez — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the district website, “The Water Replenishment District (WRD) is the largest groundwater agency by population in the state of California, managing and protecting local groundwater resources for four million residents.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Calderon:

  • “Water sustainability in the service area I represent is a reality thanks to the work you have supported me in, namely, creating renewable water sources.”
  • “Clean and safe water is a human right, thanks to your support, during my tenure in director, seven program designed to keep our water clean and safe have been put into action.”
  • “Affordability is key, so that we all have access to clean and safe water, thanks to your support WRD now produces water at less than half the cost of imported water.”

Gonzalez:       

  • “We need clean and affordable water”
  • “Stronger community involvement and transparency”
  • “More water education programs and partnerships with cities”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Long Beach City Council District 3 in California complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Long Beach City Council District 3 in California — Kailee Caruso and Kristina Duggan — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The Long Beach City Council is the city’s primary legislative body. It is responsible for adopting the city budget, approving mayoral appointees, levying taxes, and making or amending city laws, policies, and ordinances.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Caruso:           

  • “Homelessness: Kailee has a decade of experience providing hands-on assistance to folks experiencing housing insecurity, mental health challenges and substance dependancy.”
  • “Public Safety: Kailee is Pro-Public Safety. The primary function of government is to keep residents safe.”
  • “Small Business Recovery: Small businesses are the backbone of the 3rd District, and many are still struggling through the effects of the pandemic.”

Duggan:       

  • “Without safety, our Quality of Life is diminished. With significant increases in violent crime and property crime, we need more resources and policies that hold criminals accountable.”
  • “With the significant increase in homelessness over the past few years, we need to come up with both short term and long-term solutions for this tragic crisis.”
  • “I am best qualified to bring people together with solutions that make sense by convening stakeholders, redirecting existing funds to where they will matter most, and implementing a plan of action.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Palomar Health District Board of Directors Division 1 in San Diego, California, complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Palomar Health District Board of Directors Division 1 in San Diego, California — incumbent Micheal Pacheco and Robin Joy Maxson — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the Palomar health website, board members are responsible for “oversight and implementation of policies and monitoring of the organization’s performance in the establishment of strategic direction, financial stewardship, quality outcomes and leadership of the Healthcare District.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Pacheco:       

  • “Representation for all and have your voice heard about your community’s health care needs.”
  • “Continue to expand vital and specialty services needs to everyone in the San Diego region.”
  • “Provide accessible behavioral health services to those in need and their families.”

Maxson:       

  • “I am running to represent the traditionally underserved areas of District 1. My community service has been devoted to the unique needs of our families.”
  • “I live in the District and it’s important to all of our families that our two hospitals in Escondido and Poway are safe, modern and financially viable into the future.”
  • “I am concerned about the nurse-to-patient ratio. AB 394 codified into law the ratio of nurses to patients. The Emergency Department should be running with 1 nurse for every 4 patients.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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