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Stories about Minnesota

Minnesota senate president raises $35,360 this election cycle

According to campaign finance reports filed with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board, Minnesota State Sen. David Osmek has raised $35,360 and spent $8,118 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022. Osmek currently serves as the president of the state senate.

Osmek is a member of the Republican Party and assumed office in 2013. In Minnesota, the president of the senate is a state senator elected to the role by the members of the chamber. The primary job of a state senate president is to preside over legislative sessions and ensure that members of the chamber abide by procedural rules. Osmek’s current term ends in 2023.

Osmek’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Osmek

Of the $35,360 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, $18,000 came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Osmek (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$5,000.0033rd Senate District RPMENTITY
2.$5,000.00David OsmekINDIVIDUAL
3.$1,000.00Gabi MolnarINDIVIDUAL
4.$1,000.00Gabriel JabbourINDIVIDUAL
5.$1,000.00George ZenankoINDIVIDUAL
6.$1,000.00Greg MolnarINDIVIDUAL
7.$1,000.00Jean SimonINDIVIDUAL
8.$1,000.00Jerry O RelphENTITY
9.$1,000.00John BralandINDIVIDUAL
10.$1,000.00Justin ZenankoINDIVIDUAL

Expenditures by Osmek

Osmek reported $8,118 in expenditures, with $7,515 going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by Osmek (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$2,034.27Suburban ChevroletENTITY
2.$1,775.79MicrocenterENTITY
3.$825.00David OsmekINDIVIDUAL
4.$742.58George ZenankoINDIVIDUAL
5.$530.21Chase Printing Company IncENTITY
6.$452.51T-MobileENTITY
7.$352.77Frank LongINDIVIDUAL
8.$315.48Back Channel BrewingENTITY
9.$250.00TargetENTITY
10.$236.66David OsmekENTITY

How donations to Osmek compare to the equivalent role in other states

A number of factors, including whether the position holder is the lieutenant governor or a state senator, can influence donor activity. Here is how Osmek compares to the 10 other senate presidents with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 30 senate presidents are members of the Republican Party and 19 are members of the Democratic Party, with one vacancy. The lieutenant governor serves as the president of the senate in 25 states. In other states, the president of the senate is a state senator chosen by the members of the chamber. 

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
2022 Q14/14/2022
2022 Q26/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
2022 Q39/27/2022
2022 Q410/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



$8.3 million raised in the race for Minnesota governor

The general election for Governor of Minnesota will take place on Nov. 7, 2022. In total, candidates running for Minnesota governor have raised $8.3 million, received $27,100 in loans, and spent $4.1 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022. The Democratic and Republican primaries are on Aug. 8, 2022.

Here’s the breakdown for the 11 candidates who are still in the running:

Active Gubernatorial Candidates’ Campaign Finance, 1/1/2021- 3/31/2022

CandidatePartyContributionsLoansExpendituresElection Stage
Tim Walz (Incumbent)Democratic$4,650,631.16$0.00$1,838,105.67Primary
Paul GazelkaRepublican$693,380.50$0.00$384,929.20Primary
Scott JensenRepublican$1,490,673.73$0.00$747,543.54Primary
Joyce LaceyRepublican$0.00$0.00$0.00Primary
Scott MagieRepublican$285.89$0.00$284.89Primary
Michael MurphyRepublican$72,365.09$0.00$70,238.59Primary
Kendall QuallsRepublican$545,395.75$0.00$368,195.50Primary
Dr Shah NeilRepublican$303,398.22$0.00$280,987.27Primary
Richard StanekRepublican$149,052.67$0.00$108,850.80Primary
Hugh McTavishIndependence of Minnesota$0.00$0.00$0.00General
Cory HepolaIndependent$31,294.93$0.00$6,200.92General

The remaining $326,594 raised in the race for Minnesota governor went to candidates who have withdrawn.

Total fundraising in nine gubernatorial races in the 2022 election cycle

A number of factors, including whether an incumbent officeholder is running for re-election and number of candidates in a race, can influence donor activity. Here is how total fundraising by all candidates for Minnesota governor compares to the eight other gubernatorial races with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

RankStateTotal DonationsTotal CandidatesActive CandidatesElection StageAvailable Reporting Period
1Florida$106,753,1151210Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
2Texas$72,717,055245General Election1/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
3Pennsylvania$55,727,674205General Election1/1/2021 – 6/16/2022
4Arizona$24,376,8841512Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
5Ohio$22,113,46895General Election1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022
6Michigan$20,716,429167Primary Election1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
7California$13,997,678322General Election1/1/2021 – 5/21/2022
8Wisconsin$13,933,407109Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/13/2022
9Minnesota$8,263,0721411Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/30/2022

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota candidate PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
2022 Q14/14/2022
2022 Q26/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
2022 Q39/27/2022
2022 Q410/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Minnesota attorney general raises $540,932 this election cycle

According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board, Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison has raised $540,932 and spent $272,300 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022. Ellison is currently ranked sixth in state-level donations in the 2022 election cycle.

Ellison is a member of the Democratic Party and assumed office in 2019. In Minnesota, the attorney general is an elected position. The primary job of a state attorney general is to serve as chief legal adviser to the agencies and legislative organs that make up his or her state’s government, in addition to the citizens residing within the state. Ellison is running for re-election in 2022.

Ellison’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2018-2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Ellison

Of the $540,932 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 4.7 percent came from the top 10 donors.* 

Top Donors to Ellison (1/1/2021 – 3/31/3022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$3,000.00M Nazie EftekhariINDIVIDUAL
2.$2,500.00Al KamenINDIVIDUAL
3.$2,500.00Albert MillerINDIVIDUAL
4.$2,500.00Aleta MD A BorrudINDIVIDUAL
5.$2,500.00Alexander SorosINDIVIDUAL
6.$2,500.00Alida R MessingerINDIVIDUAL
7.$2,500.00Charles N NauenINDIVIDUAL
8.$2,500.00Chris CauseyINDIVIDUAL
9.$2,500.00David SchimpfINDIVIDUAL
10.$2,500.00Dilnaz WaraichINDIVIDUAL
*Donors who gave the same amount are listed in alphabetical order. An additional 61 donors contributed $2,500 to Ellison’s campaign.

Expenditures by Ellison

Ellison reported $272,300 in expenditures, with 88.3 percent going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by Ellison (1/1/2021 – 3/31/3022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$78,967.87Invictus Strategy GroupENTITY
2.$27,000.00Grant Street ConsultingENTITY
3.$25,052.34McCool Digital LLCENTITY
4.$23,250.00Ngp Van IncENTITY
5.$20,600.00Compliance Resource IncENTITY
6.$18,333.55Aggregated Unitemized ExpendituresINDIVIDUAL
7.$16,666.00MN DFL State Central CommitteeENTITY
8.$11,986.92Jeanne Kjellberg StuartINDIVIDUAL
9.$10,696.29Vantiv LLCENTITY
10.$7,835.06Minuteman PressENTITY

How donations to Ellison compare to the same office in other states

Contributions vary widely among officeholders in the same role. A number of factors, including whether the position is appointed or elected, can influence donor activity. Here is how Ellison’s donations compare to the 10 other attorney generals with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 27 attorney generals are members of the Republican Party and 23 are members of the Democratic Party. Voters elect the attorney general in 43 states, while they are chosen by a state government organ in the other seven. In 2022, 30 states are holding elections for the position.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. 

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
2022 Q14/14/2022
2022 Q26/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
2022 Q39/27/2022
2022 Q410/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

At the time of publication, the 2022 Q2 report data was not yet available from the reporting agency.This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Minnesota Democratic candidates have raised $505,322 more than Republicans

In Minnesota, state-level candidates have raised $15.5 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022. Democratic candidates have raised $7.8 million and Republican candidates have raised $7.3 million. 

Minnesota Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 328 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have raised the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal Raised
1.Tim Walz$4,650,631.16
2.Keith Ellison$540,931.88
3.Steve Simon$521,605.79
4.Kelly Morrison$74,967.75
5.Zachary Stephenson$72,661.25
6.Julie Blaha$71,837.31
7.Erin Murphy$47,361.29
8.Robert Ecklund$45,530.00
9.Aleta Borrud$43,978.87
10.Melissa A Hortman$42,226.00

Top 10 Republican candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

During the same time period, 283 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported donations for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal Raised
1.Scott Jensen$1,490,673.73
2.Dennis J Smith$1,013,414.81
3.Paul Gazelka$693,380.50
4.Kendall Qualls$545,395.75
5.Doug Wardlow$390,604.94
6.Dr Shah Neil$303,398.22
7.Michelle R Benson$276,511.75
8.James Schultz$200,795.00
9.Richard Stanek$149,052.67
10.Erik Mortensen$90,777.42

In some states, officeholders may accept donations to their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those donations are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota candidate PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
2022 Q14/14/2022
2022 Q26/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
2022 Q39/27/2022
2022 Q410/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Minnesota Republican candidates have spent $44,508 more than Democrats

In Minnesota, state-level candidates spent $7.90 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022. Democratic candidates spent $3.46 million and Republican candidates spent $3.51 million. 

Minnesota Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 327 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal Spent
1.Tim Walz$1,838,105.67
2.Keith Ellison$272,299.80
3.Steve Simon$101,885.37
4.Julie Blaha$61,620.27
5.Jamie Long$43,780.72
6.Melisa Franzen$38,393.60
7.Ryan Winkler$36,240.88
8.Melissa A Hortman$34,841.03
9.Nick Frentz$33,922.37
10.Erin Murphy$33,330.09

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

During the same time period, 284 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal Spent
1.Dr Jensen Scott$716,280.38
2.Doug Wardlow$394,383.90
3.Paul Gazelka$384,929.20
4.Kendall Qualls$368,195.50
5.Michelle R Benson$301,601.97
6.Dr Shah Neil$280,987.27
7.Dennis J Smith$271,200.99
8.Richard Stanek$108,850.80
9.James Schultz$96,768.45
10.Michael Murphy$70,238.59

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota candidate PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
2022 Q14/14/2022
2022 Q26/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
2022 Q39/27/2022
2022 Q410/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $166,072 from Minnesota campaign accounts; other states reported millions

In Minnesota, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $166,072 from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.4 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Minnesota campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $166,072 spent with Facebook, 98.67 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$113,572.13Dr Jensen ScottCandidate PAC
2.$35,440.79Dennis SmithCandidate PAC
3.$4,435.35Seiu Minn State Council Political FundNon-candidate PAC
4.$3,096.34Kim CrockettCandidate PAC
5.$2,500.00Karin HousleyCandidate PAC
6.$1,765.74DFL House CaucusNon-candidate PAC
7.$907.75Thomas C FunkCandidate PAC
8.$825.00Minnesota Young Republicans Victory FundNon-candidate PAC
9.$819.53Jessica IntermillCandidate PAC
10.$500.00Climate Vote MinnesotaNon-candidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Here is how spending with Facebook in Minnesota compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
2022 Q14/14/2022
2022 Q26/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
2022 Q39/27/2022
2022 Q410/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Minnesota Secretary of State raises $385,959 this election cycle

According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board, Minnesota Secretary of State Steve Simon has raised $385,959 and spent $101,885 between Jan. 1, 2021 and Mar. 31, 2022. Simon is currently ranked sixth in state-level donations in the 2022 election cycle.

Simon is a member of the Democratic Party and assumed office in 2015. In Minnesota, the secretary of state is an elected position. Duties vary by state but are generally administrative in nature and may include recordkeeping, certification of state documents, and serving as chief election official. Simon is running for reelection in 2022.

Simon’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Simon

Of the $385,959 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 6.74 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Simon (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$4,000.00Justine and Robert E HaselowINDIVIDUAL
2.$4,000.00Pamela S and James D DealINDIVIDUAL
3.$4,000.00Ruth and Alvin J Huss JrINDIVIDUAL
4.$2,000.00Adam JenningsINDIVIDUAL
5.$2,000.00Al KamenINDIVIDUAL
6.$2,000.00Alida R MessingerINDIVIDUAL
7.$2,000.00Allison PriceINDIVIDUAL
8.$2,000.00Amy CaplanINDIVIDUAL
9.$2,000.00Anita DonofrioINDIVIDUAL
10.$2,000.00Brian HarrisonINDIVIDUAL

Expenditures by Simon

On the expenditures side, Simon reported $101,885, with 99.14 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by Simon (1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$33,936.29Jacquelyn BatemanINDIVIDUAL
2.$20,659.71Aggregated Unitemized ExpendituresINDIVIDUAL
3.$20,000.00MN DFL State Central CommitteeENTITY
4.$13,500.00Ngp Van IncENTITY
5.$5,224.32ActblueENTITY
6.$2,495.62VantiveENTITY
7.$2,346.59Seven Corners Print & PromoENTITY
8.$1,045.25Minneapolis Labor ReviewENTITY
9.$1,000.00Take Action PACENTITY
10.$797.40US BankENTITY

How donations to Simon compare to the same office in other states

Contributions vary widely among officeholders in the same role. A number of factors, including whether the position is appointed or elected, can influence donor activity. Here is how Simon compares to the 10 other state and commonwealth secretaries with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 27 secretaries of state are members of the Republican Party and 20 are members of the Democratic Party. Voters elect the secretary of state in 35 states, while they are appointed by either the governor or state legislature in the other 12. Alaska, Hawaii, and Utah do not have secretaries of state. In 2022, 27 states are holding elections for the position.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
2022 Q14/14/2022
2022 Q26/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
2022 Q39/27/2022
2022 Q410/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Minnesota governor signs bill to fund unemployment insurance account

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz (D) signed a bill May 2 that will direct about $2.7 billion to the state’s Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund and repay the state’s $1.4 billion unemployment insurance debt to the federal government. The law also includes about $500 million to send $750 direct payments to 667,000 individuals the state considers frontline coronavirus pandemic workers.

The move will reduce the unemployment insurance tax burden on employers, which increased March 15 to help refill the fund following the coronavirus pandemic.

The legislation is a compromise between the smaller $2.7 billion bill passed in the Republican-controlled state Senate in February, which only included funding for the unemployment trust fund, and the $3.7 billion Democratic House bill passed April 25 that included $1,500 checks for 667,000 state-defined frontline pandemic workers.

Unemployment insurance is a term that refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



Minnesota House passes bill to fund unemployment insurance fund and send checks to frontline workers

The Minnesota House of Representatives passed a $3.7 billion bill on April 25 that would raise the balance of the state’s Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund and repay unemployment insurance debts to the federal government. The move would reduce the unemployment insurance tax burden on employers, which increased March 15 to help refill the fund following the coronavirus pandemic.

The legislation differs from the smaller $2.7 billion bill passed in the Republican-controlled state Senate in February, which also would have expanded the trust fund, paid the state’s federal debt, and reduced taxes for employers. The $3.7 billion Democratic House bill includes a provision that would send $1,500 checks to about 667,000 individuals the state considered frontline workers during the pandemic. The House bill would also expand unemployment insurance eligibility to hourly school workers.

Members of both chambers will meet in a conference committee to attempt to negotiate a compromise between the $2.7 billion bill and the $3.7 billion bill.

Unemployment insurance is a term that refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For more information on Minnesota’s unemployment insurance program, click here. For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

Additional reading:



The top 10 Minnesota candidates raised 14.1% of all donations

In Minnesota politics, state-level candidates and PACs raised $36.9 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Dec. 31, 2021. More than $5.2 million or 14.1 percent of all donations was raised by the 10 individuals at the top of the list. 

Top 10 Minnesota candidates (1/1/2021 – 12/31/21)

Here are the 10 Minnesota candidates who have raised the most money so far in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. 

RankCandidate Name Total DonationsTotal Expenditures
1.Tim Walz$2,453,590.83$1,324,421.38
2.Dr Jensen Scott$770,358.62$419,170.81
3.Paul Gazelka$526,926.67$114,266.30
4.Steve Simon$303,290.00$61,539.60
5.Dennis Smith$279,148.85$119,181.45
6.Keith Ellison$274,764.00$203,198.53
7.Dr Shah Neil$201,108.00$217,465.35
8.Michelle Benson$171,146.49$92,773.67
9.Doug Wardlow$114,571.14$267,726.18
10.James Schultz$106,800.00$1,390.45

Donations to top candidates in 10 states during the 2022 election cycle

Among state-level candidates and officeholders, fundraising varies widely. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how donor activity varies across states. Here is how donations to the top 10 Minnesota candidates compare to nine other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of donations to top 10 candidates, by state

RankStateDonations to Top 10 CandidatesTotal DonationsReporting Period
1Florida$110,704,048.67$532,230,957.551/1/2021 – 2/28/2022
2Texas$105,345,995.42$375,309,268.771/1/2021 – 2/19/2022
3Pennsylvania$34,501,470.61$343,783,026.521/1/2021 – 3/09/2022
4Michigan$25,358,422.95$89,192,492.111/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
5Ohio$24,752,903.97$79,210,717.621/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
6Arizona$22,291,313.55$72,806,908.751/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
7Wisconsin$19,907,524.3755,603,885.141/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
8North Carolina$8,927,365.01$39,859,339.461/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
9Indiana$7,661,472.0249,459,363.581/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
10Minnesota$5,201,704.60$36,935,152.761/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

In some states, officeholders may accept donations to their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Any reported donations by those officeholders are included in candidate donation numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota candidate PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2022
2022 Q14/14/2022
2022 Q26/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/25/2022
2022 Q39/27/2022
2022 Q410/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.