Tagmissouri

Stories about Missouri

18 Missourian candidates completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey since July 7

Below are a selection of responses from the candidates who filled out Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey since July 7. To read each candidate’s full responses, click their name at the bottom of the article.

Kenny Edgar is running for Missouri House of Representatives to represent District 92 and the Democratic primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Edgar responded to the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

“Public education. Making sure public sector unions have a strong voice. Keep increasing pay for public sector workers. Improve roads and bridges.”

Click here to read the rest of Edgar’s answers. 

Paul Walker is running for  U.S. House to represent Missouri’s 7th Congressional District and the Republican primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Walker responded to the question “Please list below 3 key messages of your campaign. What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?”

“I am a Constitutional Conservative. Less taxes, less spending, less government. We must help our veterans in any way we can.”

Click here to read the rest of Walker’s answers. 

If you’re a Missouri candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey. The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

If you’re not running for office but you would like to know more about candidates in Missouri, share the link and urge them to take the survey!

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28 Missourian candidates completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey in the first week of July

Below are a selection of responses from the candidates who filled out Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey since July 1, 2022. To read each candidate’s full responses, click their name at the bottom of the article.

AJ Exner is running for election to the Missouri House of Representatives to represent District 135 and the Republican primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Exner responded to the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

“I am passionate about Education, our law enforcement, and finding ways to alleviate the pressures that are plaguing our families across the region.”

Click here to read the rest of Exner’s answers. 

John Hartwig is running for Missouri State Auditor and the Libertarian primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Hartwig responded to the question “What qualities do you possess that you believe would make you a successful officeholder?”

“As a Certified Public Accountant, I maintain my independence and seek the truth. These are two qualities that have always served me well.”

Click here to read the rest of Hartwig’s answers. 

If you’re a Missouri candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey. The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

If you’re not running for office but you would like to know more about candidates in Missouri, share the link and urge them to take the survey!

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Governor Parson signed 28 bills in June

During the month of June, Gov. Mike Parson (R) signed 28 bills into law. Below is a list of bills signed on each date.

  • June 7: House Bill 1600, House Bill 1697, House Bill 1725, House Bill 2149, House Bill 2365, House Bill 2416, and Senate Bill 987
  • June 11: House Bill 2005
  • June 16: House Bill 1472, House Bill 2162, Senate Bill 655, Senate Bill 718, Senate Bill 725, and Senate Bill 799
  • June 23: Senate Bill 652
  • June 27: Senate Bill 678
  • June 29: House Bill 1552, House Bill 1606, House Bill 1878, Senate Bill 745, and Senate Bill 820
  • June 30: House Bill 1662, House Bill 2116, House Bill 2168, House Bill 2331, Senate Bill 710, Senate Bill 758, and Senate Bill 886

The Missouri General Assembly adjourned the 2022 legislative session on May 13. There were a total of 2,104 bills introduced, and two bills passed. Parson has signed 36 bills since the end of the legislative session. 

The Governor of the State of Missouri is an elected constitutional officer, the head of the executive branch, and the highest state office in Missouri. The governor is popularly elected every four years by a plurality and is limited to two terms. Parson is the 57th governor of Missouri. He assumed office on June 1, 2018, following the resignation of Eric Greitens.



Missouri redistricting commission enacted new state House boundaries on January 19

The House Independent Bipartisan Citizens Commission unanimously approved new state House district boundaries on January 19. Fourteen of the commission’s 20 members were required to approve the plan. 

Two distinct politician commissions are responsible for state legislative redistricting in Missouri—one for the state Senate and another for the state House of Representatives. To form the House commission, the congressional district committee of each major political party nominates two members per congressional district, for a total of 32 nominees. From this pool, the governor appoints one member per party per district, for a total of 16 commissioners.

If the commission had been unable to agree on a redistricting plan by January 23, authority over the process would have transferred to the Missouri Judicial Commission for Redistricting. 
In a press release issued after the map was finalized, commission chair Jerry Hunter said, “I want to personally thank all of the commissioners for the hard work that was put in by the commissioners and, obviously, as all of you know, the supporting individuals that have been instrumental to helping get this map done on both sides – on both the Democratic and Republican sides.” Rudi Keller of the Missouri Independent wrote, “Of the 163 districts…, there are 38 where Democrats should have the advantage, 97 where Republicans are dominant and 28 districts with past election results showing less than a 10% advantage for either party.”

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Missouri Judicial Redistricting Commission enacted new state Senate boundaries in March

Missouri completed its legislative redistricting on March 15 when the state’s Judicial Redistricting Commission filed new state Senate district boundaries with the secretary of state.

Two distinct politician commissions are responsible for state legislative redistricting in Missouri—one for the state Senate and another for the state House of Representatives. To form the Senate commission, the state committee of both major political parties nominates 10 members, for a total of 20 nominees. From this pool, the governor selects five members per party, for a total of 10 commissioners. 

The Senate Independent Bipartisan Citizens Commission failed to submit proposed maps to the secretary of state’s office by the December 23, 2021, deadline. Therefore, responsibility for developing Senate district boundaries was assumed by the Missouri Judicial Commission for Redistricting. The judicial commission released its final plan and sent it to the secretary of state’s office on March 15. The commission’s chair, Missouri Appeals Court Justice Cynthia Lynette Martin, said in a press release, “The Judicial Redistricting Commission’s work has been thorough and labor intensive, and was purposefully undertaken with the goal to file a constitutionally compliant plan and map well in advance of the commission’s constitutional deadline to avoid disenfranchising voters given the candidate filing deadline and the deadline for preparing ballots.”
Scott Faughn of The Missouri Times wrote that “[t]he biggest difference in this map and that previous map is that it shifts the weight of some of the districts from rural weighted districts to evenly split districts and even enhances the suburban influence inside several republican seats.” He added, “the new map produces 7 solid democratic districts, and 3 likely democratic districts. On the republican side the new map produces 18 solid republican districts, and 3 more likely republican districts,” with two competitive districts when the current incumbents no longer seek office.

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Missouri enacted new congressional boundaries in May

Missouri enacted new congressional district boundaries on May 18 when Gov. Mike Parson (R) signed them into law. According to Rudi Keller of the Missouri Independent, “No change in the partisan makeup of the Missouri delegation, currently six Republicans and two Democrats, is expected as a result of the map.” Keller also wrote, “nine counties…shifted almost wholly or entirely into new districts. Boundaries shifted in the five large-population counties that were previously split and a new split was introduced in Boone County in central Missouri.” This map takes effect for Missouri’s 2022 congressional elections.

In Missouri, congressional district boundaries are drawn by the state legislature. These lines are subject to veto by the governor.

After the Senate passed the maps, Keller wrote: “The first plan, released in December with backing from the Republican leaders of both chambers, essentially kept the partisan breakdown of the state’s delegation unchanged, with six safe Republican districts and two Democratic districts in Kansas City and St. Louis. The House passed that bill in January and, after weeks of on-and-off debate, the Senate passed a significantly altered version in late March. The seven members of the Senate’s conservative caucus demanded a map that cracked the Kansas City district and combined it with a huge swath of rural counties to make it possible for the GOP to capture the seat. The ‘6-2’ vs. ‘7-1’ debate came to a head in February when the conservative caucus began a filibuster that blocked progress not only on the redistricting plan but also on basically every other bill. At one point, two Republican Senators got into a shouting match and had to be physically separated.”

The Missouri House of Representatives approved the final version of the new congressional districts on May 9 by a vote of 101-47. Eighty-six Republicans and 15 Democrats approved the new map and 28 Democrats and 19 Republicans voted against it. The state Senate approved the legislation—known as HB 2909—on May 11 by a vote of 22-11. Sixteen Republicans and six Democrats voted to approve the new boundaries and seven Republicans and four Democrats voted against it.

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Missouri General Assembly considered an average of 1,866 bills between 2011-2022

Between 2011 and 2022, the Missouri General Assembly considered an average of 1,866 bills and passed an average of 93 bills. The General Assembly passes an average of 5.2% of considered bills each year. In 2022, the Missouri House and Senate considered an above average number of bills (2,105), but passed the lowest number of bills since 2011 (19). They passed 0.9% of considered bills during the 2022 session.

The highest number of considered bills was in 2020 (2,170). The highest number of passed bills was in 2014 (144). In 2013, the Missouri General Assembly passed the highest percentage of considered bills passing 8.4%.

In order for a bill to become law, it must pass both the House and Senate and be signed by Gov. Mike Parson (R) or the legislature overrides a veto from the governor. Parson has signed 17 bills since the end of the legislative session on May 13.

The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. It is a bicameral legislature composed of a 34-member Senate and a 163-member House of Representatives. Senators are term limited to two four-year terms and representatives are limited to four two-year terms. The Missouri General Assembly is a part-time legislature. The 2022 session convened on Jan. 5 and will adjourn May 13. 

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. The Republicans have a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. In the event of a veto issued by Gov. Parson, the Republican majority is large enough to override the veto without any votes from members of the Democratic Party. 

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No state officials resigned, died, or were appointed in Missouri in June

In June, there have been no irregular officeholder transitions in Missouri for offices within Ballotpedia’s coverage scope. This includes the resignation, death, appointment, or winning of a special election in positions such as a state executive office, a seat in the General Assembly, or a non-district judgeship. 

As of June 24, 2022, all state executive offices were filled and there were no vacancies in the Missouri State Senate. There are seven vacancies in the Missouri House of Representatives.

District 34 became vacant after Rick Roeber was expelled from the House by unanimous vote in April 2021. District 65 became vacant after the death of Tom Hannegan in Oct. 2021. District 114 has been vacant since Nov. 2021 and was previously held by Becky Ruth. In the first week of Jan. 2022, Districts 147, 108, and 61 all became vacant. They were held by Wayne Wallingford, Justin Hill, and Aaron Griesheimer, respectively. Rory Rowland resigned from District 29 in April 2022 after he was elected as mayor of Independence, Missouri.

Vacancies in the Missouri General Assembly are filled through a special election called by the governor. Missouri is one of 25 states that fill vacancies in the state legislature through special elections. As of April 2022, 45 state legislative special elections have been scheduled nationwide for 2022 in 20 states. Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (R) has not called for any legislative special elections this year. All Missouri House of Representatives districts will be up for regular election on Nov. 8. 

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Missouri Supreme Court has made two decisions in June

The Missouri Supreme Court has made two decisions so far in June.

Alfred J. (A.J.) Giudicy v. Mercy Hospitals East Communities f/k/a St. John’s Mercy Medical Center, and Michael J. Chehval, M.D. was argued on March 22, 2022 and the opinion was issued on June 14. The circuit court’s decision was unanimously affirmed. The case summary can be found here.

State of Missouri v. Daviune C. Minor was argued on March 30, 2022 and the opinion was issued on June 14. The circuit court’s decision was affirmed by all the justices. The case summary can be found here.

In 2022, the Missouri Supreme Court has heard arguments in 25 cases and issued 28 decisions.

Founded in 1820, the Missouri Supreme Court is the state’s court of last resort and has seven justices. Justices are are appointed to 12-year terms by the governor from a list provided by the Missouri Appellete Judicial Comission. As of Sept. 2021, three judges were appointed by a Democratic governor and four by a Republican governor. 

The jurisdiction of the Missouri Supreme Court includes appeals concerning the validity of federal statutes and treaties in addition to state statues, state revenue laws, the right of a state elected official to hold office, and the imposition of the death penalty. The Missouri Supreme Court also has the discretion to hear appeals on questions of general interest and if a lower court’s decision is in conflict with a previous appellate decision.  



The Missouri General Assembly considered the highest number of appropriation bills

In 2022, the Missouri General Assembly considered the highest number of appropriation bills since 2020. The General Assembly considered 37 appropriation bills during the 2022 legislative session and passed four bills. In 2020, the General Assembly considered 15 bills and also passed four bills.  

Two of the bills that became law in 2022 were signed after the end of the legislative session. In order for a bill to become law, it must pass both the House and Senate and be signed by Gov. Mike Parson (R) or the legislature overrides a veto from the governor. House Bill 2162 and Senate Bill 725 were both signed on July 16.

There is only one appropriation committee in the Missouri Legislature- the Senate Appropriations Committee. The Missouri General Assembly has 66 total standing committees. The Missouri Senate has 20 standing committees, the Missouri House of Representatives has 34 standing committees, and there are 12 joint legislative committees in the Missouri Legislature. The number of special committees fluctuates each session. The subject matter of these committees is more specialized than the standing committees, so most of these committees have been assigned less bills on average than the standing committees.

The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. It is a bicameral legislature composed of a 34-member Senate and a 163-member House of Representatives. Senators are term limited to two four-year terms and representatives are limited to four two-year terms. The Missouri General Assembly is a part-time legislature. The 2022 session convened on Jan. 5 and will adjourn May 13. 

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. The Republicans have a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. In the event of a veto issued by Gov. Parson, the Republican majority is large enough to override the veto without any votes from members of the Democratic Party. 

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