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Stories about Missouri

All candidates for Missouri House of Representatives District 34 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Missouri House of Representatives District 34 — Kemp Strickler (D) and J.C. Crossley (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Missouri’s state legislature. Missouri is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Strickler:       

  • “I have spent my career analyzing data and listening to others to find solutions to difficult problems. I want to use that experience to improve educational opportunities for our children, grow our local businesses, and enhance the lives of Lee’s Summit residents.”
  • “From my many conversations, I know that the vast majority of Lee’s Summit residents want a representative who they can trust and who will work toward common sense solutions to the problems facing our state. I promise to provide the reasonable, common-sense representation that they have been asking for.”
  • “I believe fundamentally that ALL our citizens, no matter their gender, race, religion, or sexual orientation deserve equal rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

Crossley:                   

  • “People seem to be dissatisfied with their government and I believe the main reason is that we have varied from the Constitution of Missouri. The Preamble states; We the people of Missouri, with profound reverence for the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, and grateful for His goodness, do establish this Constitution for the better government of the state.”
  • “Missouri’s budget is larger than ever, whether the money comes from the state or federal coffers it is still tax payers money and we ( citizens) have a responsibility to use it wisely.”
  • “I believe where government fails is serving the people with the smallest voice, the disabled, the elderly, people that thru no fault of their own find themselves without help.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Missouri House of Representatives District 108 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Missouri House of Representatives District 108 — Susan Shumway (D) and Justin Hicks (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Missouri’s state legislature. Missouri is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Shumway:           

  • “Health Care is a right and Missouri needs to addressed health care needs of MIssourians.”
  • “A good education is a vital foundation that all children should receive.”
  • “No one person is greater than another and there should be Equality of all people”

Hicks:       

  • “Justin Hicks wants to ensure state and local governments make Constitution-based legislation.”
  • “Justin Hicks wants to nullify personal property tax to reduce the burden on Missouri citizens.”
  • “Justin Hicks wants to pass economic development legislation that helps Missouri communities thrive no matter where they are located in the state.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Missouri House of Representatives District 107 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Missouri House of Representatives District 107 — Tracy Grundy (D) and Mark Matthiesen (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Missouri’s state legislature. Missouri is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Grundy:   

“I believe in equal treatment under the law for every Missourian regardless of race, color, age, physical, intellectual, and/or developmental abilities, economic status, religion, creed, sex, national origin, ethnicity, veteran or military status, sexual orientation, or gender identity. I support adding “sexual orientation and gender identity” to the non-discrimination laws and policies of our state, and the passage of hate crime legislation to protect equal rights.”

Matthiesen:                     

“I am passionate about Quality Education. From Pre-K through the collegiate levels, our schools shape the minds of our children and determine the future quality of society. Our schools need the appropriate resources to achieve there goals. They should be responsible stewards of the taxpayer’s money that they are given. Parents should provided with as many school options that are possible to ensure that each child’s educational needs will be met.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Missouri House of Representatives District 100 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Missouri House of Representatives District 100 — Colin Lovett (D) and Philip Oehlerking (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Missouri’s state legislature. Missouri is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Lovett:   

“Schools: – Tax dollars should go to public schools that we can hold accountable, including access to post K-12 community colleges – We should pay teachers better and provide the necessary tools to teach – Diversity and inclusion policies protect our most vulnerable students and staff – Curriculum should reflect our actual history; we should equip our kids with truth and the ability to critically think”

Oehlerking:                     

“I am dedicated to lifting up all Missourians to ensure they have a bright future. Having worked at MOHELA, I have helped many college graduates buried under student loan debt which is preventing them from buying a home or starting a family. Not only do we need to adopt policies that make higher education affordable, but we must also adopt policies that promote both high paying STEM jobs and skilled jobs, such as mechanics, plumbers, and HVAC workers.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



Gov. Mike Parson calls an extraordinary session

Governor Mike Parson (R) announced an extraordinary session on August 22, 2022 which will focus on an income tax cut and agricultural tax incentives proposal. This extraordinary session is set to begin on September 6 and the annual veto session begins on September 14.

During the regular 2022 session, Parson vetoed a tax cut and tax credit bill (House Bill 2090). The proposal Parson is presenting to the legislature for the extraordinary session would lower the state’s top income tax rate and eliminate the bottom income tax bracket. If passed, the income tax cuts will total about $700 million.

Senator Lincoln Hough (R) spoke in support of the plan saying, “I welcome Gov. Parson’s call for a special session — and I plan to file a bill on the first day to cut taxes for every family in Missouri. Allowing Missourians to make more income before they actually have to file taxes is continuing to remove burdensome government from the lives of everyday Missourians.”

Representative Crystal Quade (D) disagreed with Gov. Parson’s plan. She said, “A cardinal rule of responsible budgeting is don’t use temporary revenue to take on permanent expenses. Yet the governor’s plan uses a temporary budget surplus as cover for a permanent loss of revenue that will put Missouri government back into the financial hole it just climbed out of.”

The Missouri General Assembly adjourned the regular 2022 legislative session on May 13. There were a total of 2,104 bills introduced and two bills passed.

Editor’s note: A previous version of this article incorrectly used the term “special session” to refer the the extraordinary session that was called on August 22, 2022.



On Missourian candidate completes Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Below are a selection of responses from the candidate who filled out Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey on August 27. To read Catherine Dreher’s full responses, click her name at the bottom of the article.

Dreher is running for the Missouri State Senate to represent District 10. She advanced from the Libertarian Party primary on August 2. The primary is on November 8. Here’s how Dreher responded to the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

“I’m passionate about limiting the size of government, criminal justice reform, school choice that also protects homeschoolers, repealing the gas tax, and reducing the amount of federal tax dollars our state takes.”

If you’re a Missouri candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey. The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

If you’re not running for office but you would like to know more about candidates in Missouri, share the link and urge them to take the survey!

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Previewing the Missouri Supreme Court’s September docket

The Missouri Supreme Court has 11 cases on the docket for the month of September. This is the fewest number of cases argued in front of the Supreme Court in the month of September since 2017. 

The following cases will be heard on three separate days at the end of September. 

September 20 

  • Cedar County Commission, et al. v. Governor Michael Parson, et al
  • Christopher Zang v. City of St. Charles, Missouri, Kyle G. Petersen v. State of Missouri
  • In re: Lorenzo Antoine Hester

September 21

  • Saddle and Sirloin Club of Kansas City v. Director of Revenue
  • Charter Communications Entertainment I LLC v. Director of Revenue
  • Alvin Brockington, Individually and on Behalf of All Similarly Situated v. New Horizons Enterprises LLC
  • In re: Kimberly D. Tyler

September 28

  • Gary M. Weibrecht v. Treasurer of Missouri as Custodian of Second Injury Fund
  • James W. Swafford v. Treasurer of Missouri as Custodian of Second Injury Fund
  • Thomas Dubuc v. Treasurer of the State of Missouri Custodian of the Second Injury Fund
  • In re: Amy A. McGowan

The Missouri Supreme Court has heard arguments in 25 cases in 2022 and issued 28 decisions.

Founded in 1820, the Missouri Supreme Court is the state’s court of last resort and has seven justices. Justices are appointed to 12-year terms by the governor from a list provided by the Missouri Appellate Judicial Commission. As of Sept. 2022, three judges were appointed by a Democratic governor and four by a Republican governor. 

The jurisdiction of the Missouri Supreme Court includes appeals concerning the validity of federal statutes and treaties in addition to state statues, state revenue laws, the right of a state elected official to hold office, and the imposition of the death penalty. The Missouri Supreme Court also has the discretion to hear appeals on questions of general interest and if a lower court’s decision is in conflict with a previous appellate decision.  



John Wood (I) drops out of race for U.S. Senate in Missouri

John Wood (I), a former senior investigator for the January 6th Select Committee, announced that he was suspending his campaign for U.S. Senate in Missouri. Wood qualified for the ballot on August 1, one day before the state’s Republican primary. On August 23, Wood said that he saw no path to victory in the general election following Eric Greitens’ loss to Eric Schmitt in the Republican primary.

In a statement, Wood said, “I made the decision to run for the United States Senate when Eric Greitens was the favorite for the Republican nomination. That would have been unacceptable, embarrassing, and dangerous for my party, my state, and my country.”

Former U.S. Sen. John Danforth (R) endorsed Wood, while Danforth’s Missouri Stands United PAC spent more than $3 million supporting Wood’s campaign. Wood said he filed to run “as an independent to offer Missourians who are fed up and exhausted by the status quo something better. A common sense campaign that unites our state instead of dividing us,” and that he would serve as an independent who caucuses with the Republican Party.

Trudy Busch Valentine (D), Eric Schmitt (R), and five other candidates are running in the general election for one of Missouri’s U.S. Senate seats on November 8, 2022. Sen. Roy Blunt (R), who first took office in 2011, announced on March 8, 2021, that he would not seek re-election.

As of August 2022, three independent election forecasters rated the general election as Solid Republican or Safe Republican. Donald Trump (R) won the state in the 2020 presidential election by a 15.4 percentage point margin. The last time a Democratic candidate won a statewide election in Missouri was in 2012, when U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D) and Gov. Jay Nixon (D) both won re-election. Missouri’s other U.S. Senator, Josh Hawley (R), won the 2018 election by a 5.8 percentage point margin.



Missouri state legislative incumbents lost in primaries at an increased rate

Seven state legislative incumbents—four Democrats and three Republicans—lost to primary challengers on August 2. 

This represents 5.3% of incumbents who filed for re-election, the largest number and highest rate of incumbent primary defeats in the state in five election cycles.

A list of incumbents defeated, all of whom were first elected to office within the past four years, is included below:

Of these seven defeats, one was guaranteed before a single ballot was cast. This is because two incumbents—Reps. Mike Person and Raychel Proudie—were drawn into the same district following redistricting, meaning one or the other had to lose.

This year, Democratic incumbents lost at a higher rate than Republicans. Among Democrats, the four defeats represent 8.7% of the 46 incumbents who ran for re-election. For Republicans, the three defeats represent 3.5% of the 86 incumbents in that party who ran.

Learn more about incumbents defeated in Missouri and across other states by clicking “Learn More” below.



Ranked-choice voting initiative will not appear on the ballot in Missouri

On August 9, Secretary of State John Ashcroft (R) announced that a top-four ranked-choice voting initiative will not make the Missouri general election ballot due to an insufficient number of valid signatures submitted.

The campaign behind the citizen initiative, Better Elections, needed to submit at least 171,592 valid signatures in order to qualify the initiative for the ballot. To receive a Certificate of Sufficiency, a minimum number of valid signatures must be obtained in six of the eight congressional districts in Missouri. Missouri is one of sixteen states with a signature distribution requirement for citizen-initiated measures, and of those sixteen, Missouri is one of five states where the distribution requirement is based on congressional districts.

In the tabulated results put out by Secretary Ashcroft’s office, the initiative did not meet the valid signature requirement in any of Missouri’s eight congressional districts.

Another citizen initiative, a measure that would legalize marijuana in Missouri, did pass the verification process and will appear on the ballot in November.

Scott Charton, a spokesman for the Better Elections campaign, said the campaign will “remain committed to our core mission: giving voters better and more choices in elections, empowering them to hold politicians accountable when they lose their way, and ensuring integrity in elections.”

The initiative would have changed the electoral system in Missouri for electing state executive, state legislative, and congressional officials. It would have replaced partisan primaries with open top-four primaries, and would have established ranked-choice voting for general elections, in which voters could rank the four candidates that succeeded from the primaries. The system would have been similar to Alaska’s, where voters approved an initiative in 2020. In addition to Alaska, Maine also allows ranked-choice voting in federal elections and certain statewide primaries, and Hawaii has also enacted that ranked-choice voting for federal special elections would take place starting in 2023.

Ranked-choice voting will also appear on the ballot in another state this year–Nevada has put a top-five ranked choice voting initiative on the ballot.

Currently, there are five measures on the ballot in Missouri: three legislatively referred constitutional amendments, one citizen-initiated constitutional amendment, and one constitutional convention question.

Additional reading: