Tagnew hampshire

Stories about New Hampshire

New Hampshire, Rhode Island hold congressional primaries on September 8

On September 8, New Hampshire and Rhode Island held statewide primaries. A total of six congressional seats—two U.S. Senate seats and four U.S. House seats—were on the ballot. All six incumbents filed for re-election and won their respective primaries. The primary winners advanced to the general election on November 3.

New Hampshire

Incumbent Jeanne Shaheen (D) won the Democratic primary for her Class II Senate seat, advancing over two challengers with 94% of the vote. Bryant Messner won the Republican primary for the seat. With 98% of precincts reporting, he secured over 50% of the vote to the second-place finisher’s 42%.

In New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District, incumbent Chris Pappas advanced unopposed from the Democratic primary. He will face Republican Matt Mowers in the general election after Mowers won the Republican primary with 59% of the vote. In the 2nd District, incumbent Annie Kuster (D) secured 93% of the vote to win the Democratic primary. With 98% of precincts reporting, Steve Negron advanced from the four-candidate Republican primary with 48% of the vote.

Rhode Island

In the race for Rhode Island’s Class II Senate seat, both incumbent Jack Reed (D) and Republican challenger Allen Waters advanced from their respective primaries unopposed.

Incumbent Rep. David Ciciline (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary for Rhode Island’s 1st Congressional District seat. No Republican filed in the race, so Ciciline won’t face major-party opposition in the general election. Two independent challengers will be on the ballot. In the 2nd District, incumbent Jim Langevin (D) earned 66% of the vote to advance from the Democratic primary. Republican Robert Lancia won the two-candidate Republican primary with 73% of the vote.

These primaries were the 47th and 48th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The 49th primary will be held on September 15 in Delaware.

Additional reading


September 8 primary review: Unofficial results from New Hampshire and Rhode Island indicate majority of opposed incumbents defeated primary challengers

Image of a red sign with the words "Polling Place" a pointing arrow.

New Hampshire and Rhode Island held statewide primaries on September 8, 2020. Candidates ran in elections for the following offices.

New Hampshire:
• Governor: Incumbent Chris Sununu (R) faced two primary challengers and advanced to the general election. He faces Dan Feltes (D) and Darryl Perry (L) in the general election.
• Executive Council (5 seats): Three incumbents—two Democrats and one Republican—filed for re-election. All three incumbents were unopposed and advanced to the general election.
• State Senate (24 seats): Twenty-one incumbents—11 Democrats and 10 Republicans—filed for re-election. Three incumbents faced a primary challenger. Of these, one incumbent, David Starr (R-1), lost his bid for re-election. The remaining 20 incumbents advanced to the general election.

• State House of Representatives (400 seats): Three-hundred and twenty-two incumbents—198 Democrats and 124 Republicans—filed for re-election. Ninety-six incumbents faced a primary challenger. As of September 10, eight incumbents had lost their bids for re-election (four Democrats and four Republicans), 281 incumbents advanced, and 33 incumbents’ races had not been called.

Rhode Island:
• State Senate (38 seats): Thirty-four incumbents—29 Democrats and five Republicans—filed for re-election. Ten incumbents faced a primary challenger. As of September 10, the contested incumbents’ races had not been called. Twenty-four incumbents advanced to the general election.

• State House of Representatives (75 seats): Sixty-nine incumbents—61 Democrats and eight Republicans—filed for re-election. Sixteen incumbents faced a primary challenger. As of September 10, no incumbents had lost their bids for re-election, but 15 incumbents’ races had not been called. Fifty-four incumbents advanced to the general election.

Candidates competed to advance to the general election scheduled for November 3, 2020.

New Hampshire has a divided government, meaning no political party holds a state government trifecta. Rhode Island has a Democratic state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.

New Hampshire and Rhode Island were the 47th and 48th primaries to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next primary is on September 15 in Delaware.

Additional reading


Mowers wins Republican primary in New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District

Matt Mowers won the five-candidate Republican primary in New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District. With 38% of precincts reporting, Mowers had received 61% of the vote and Matt Mayberry was second with 27%.

Mowers has worked as the executive director of the New Hampshire Republican State Committee, an official in the 2016 Trump presidential campaign, and a senior White House advisor in the State Department. He received endorsements from President Donald Trump (R) and U.S. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.).

Mayberry is an Air Force veteran and businessman. He was endorsed by U.S. Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.) and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R).

Incumbent Chris Pappas (D) was first elected in 2018, defeating Eddie Edwards (R) 54% to 45%. Pappas is seeking re-election and was unopposed in the Democratic primary. The 1st District changed party hands five times between 2006 and 2016.



Messner wins Republican Senate primary in New Hampshire

Image of several stickers with the words "I voted"

Bryant “Corky” Messner won the Republican primary for U.S. Senate in New Hampshire. With 66% of precincts reporting, he had received 50% of the vote to Don Bolduc’s 43%. Two others ran.

President Donald Trump (R) and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) endorsed Messner in the primary. Bolduc had endorsements from Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Rep. Michael Waltz (R-Fla.).

Incumbent Jeanne Shaheen (D) is seeking re-election and won the Democratic primary. She was first elected in 2008 and won re-election in 2014 with 51.5% of the vote to Scott Brown’s (R) 48.2%.



New Hampshire, Rhode Island holding primaries September 8

New Hampshire and Rhode Island are holding statewide primaries on September 8, 2020. Candidates are running in elections for the following offices in each state:

New Hampshire
• U.S. Senate (1 seat)
• U.S. House (2 seats)
• Governor
• Executive Council (5 seats)
• State Senate (24 seats)

• State House of Representatives (400 seats)

Rhode Island
• U.S. Senate (1 seat)
• U.S. House (2 seats)
• State Senate (38 seats)

• State House of Representatives (75 seats)

Candidates in the primary are competing to advance to the general election scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Entering the 2020 election, the U.S. Senate has 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democratic Party. Only 35 out of 100 Senate seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. The U.S. House has 232 Democrats, 198 Republicans, one Libertarian, and four vacancies. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

New Hampshire has a divided government, meaning no political party holds a state government trifecta. Rhode Island has a Democratic state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.

New Hampshire and Rhode Island are the 47th and 48th primaries to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next primary is on September 15 in Delaware.

Additional reading:


Mason confirmed as New Hampshire Fish and Game executive

The New Hampshire Executive Council confirmed dairy farmer Scott Mason as the New Hampshire Executive Director of Fish and Game on August 5. Governor Chris Sununu (R) initially appointed Mason on June 10 of this year.

Mason will serve a term ending in March 2024. He succeeds three-term executive director Glenn Normandeau, whose third and final term was extended from March 31, 2020, to August pending his replacement’s confirmation. The New Hampshire Fish and Game Commission voted in September 2019 not to reappoint Normandeau to the role.

As the Fish and Game executive director, Mason is tasked with overseeing the conservation and protection of fish and game and their habitats, as well as keeping the public informed about these resources. Ballotpedia covers 11 other state executive offices in New Hampshire. All of these offices except for the offices of the governor, attorney general, secretary of state, and executive council are non-partisan positions.

Additional reading:


Lucas resigns from New Hampshire House of Representatives, creating 10th vacancy in chamber

The current vacancy count in the New Hampshire House of Representatives this week reached a total of 10 seats. Rep. Gates Lucas (R) resigned from the chamber on July 14, citing a move outside his district as the reason. Lucas announced his resignation on Twitter and said, “Today I resigned from the @NHHouseofReps given I am moving to Portsmouth. I’m proud of the work we’ve done in the house to uphold @GovChrisSununu’s vetoes and reject many of the radical policies of the left. It’s been an honor serving Sunapee & Croydon!”
Lucas had represented New Hampshire’s House District Sullivan 2 since 2018. He did not file to run for re-election this year. The other vacant seats in the chamber are in Grafton 12, Cheshire 4, Hillsborough 23, Grafton 9, Hillsborough 43, Hillsborough 37, Strafford 10, Hillsborough 27, and Hillsborough 7. Eight of the 10 vacancies occurred this year.
Vacancies in the New Hampshire state legislature are filled by special election. A town or city in the district represented by the vacant seat must make a formal request to the governor and executive council for a special election. The governor and council then approve or deny the request within 21 days. So far, there has only been one special election called in New Hampshire this year. It was for the Merrimack 24 district and took place on March 10.


New Hampshire’s stay-at-home order to expire on June 15

On June 11, Gov. Chris Sununu (R) announced that New Hampshire’s stay-at-home order will expire on June 15 at 11:59 p.m.

When the order lifts, the following businesses are permitted to reopen: amateur sports, bowling, arcades, laser tag and billiard halls, charitable gaming, gyms and fitness centers (50% capacity), libraries, motorcycle rides, museums and art galleries, outdoor attractions, outdoor race tracks, public, campground and commercial pools, road races, and tourist trains.

Low physical contact amateur sports, such as baseball and softball, are allowed to resume, and indoor recreational facilities can reopen at 50% capacity. Funeral homes may reopen and weddings may resume.

In-restaurant dining capacity can rise if there’s enough floor space to maintain social distancing in six counties—Belknap, Coos, Carrol, Cheshire, Sullivan, and Grafton. In-restaurant dining can resume at 50% capacity in Rockingham, Hillsborough, Merrimack and Strafford counties.

Ballotpedia is tracking how state governments plan to reopen after the coronavirus pandemic.



Filing deadline passes for congressional candidates in Connecticut, New Hampshire

On June 11 and June 12, the major-party filing deadline passed to run for U.S. Congress in Connecticut and New Hampshire, respectively. The Connecticut filing deadline had previously been June 9, but it was moved to June 11 by Governor Ned Lamont’s (D) executive order in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

In Connecticut, neither U.S. Senate seat is up for election this year. The incumbents for the state’s five U.S. House seats—John Larson (D) in District 1, Joe Courtney (D) in District 2, Rosa DeLauro (D) in District 3, James Himes (D) in District 4, and Jahana Hayes (D) in District 5—are all running for re-election. The primary for candidates who aren’t nominated via party convention is on August 11.

In New Hampshire, U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D) is running for re-election to her seat. The incumbents for the state’s two U.S. House seats—Chris Pappas (D) in District 1 and Annie Kuster (D) in District 2—are both running for re-election, as well. The state’s primary is on September 8.

Connecticut and New Hampshire’s statewide filing deadlines were the 46th and 47th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on June 24 in Rhode Island, and the final two statewide filing deadlines are in Delaware and Louisiana in July.

The national general election is on November 3, 2020. Entering the 2020 election, the U.S. Senate has 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democratic Party. Thirty-five out of the 100 U.S. Senate seats are up for election, including two seats up for special election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. The U.S. House of Representatives has 233 Democrats, 197 Republicans, one Libertarian, and four vacancies. All 435 U.S. House seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

Additional reading:


Candidate filing period ends for state executive and legislative offices in three states

The filing deadline has passed to run for state executive and legislative offices in Connecticut, Florida, and New Hampshire. The deadline passed for Connecticut on June 11. For Florida and New Hampshire, it passed on June 12.

Candidates filed for the following state executive and legislative offices:
  • Connecticut: State Senate (36 seats) and State House (151 seats)
  • Florida: State Senate (20 seats) and State House (120 seats)
  • New Hampshire: Governor, Executive Council (5 seats), State Senate (24 seats), and State House (400 seats)

The general election in each state is scheduled for November 3, 2020. The primary in Connecticut is scheduled for August 11, in Florida for August 18, and in New Hampshire for September 8.

Connecticut and New Hampshire’s statewide filing deadlines were the 46th and 47th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. Florida’s filing deadline for congressional and certain judicial offices passed on April 24, which was the 36th statewide filing deadline of 2020. The next statewide filing deadline is on June 24 in Rhode Island.

Connecticut and Florida have Democratic and Republican state government trifectas, respectively. A state government trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers. New Hampshire has a divided government in which no party holds a trifecta.

Additional reading:


Bitnami