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Stories about North Carolina

These North Carolina State Senate candidates raised the most money and lost

Elections for all 50 seats in the North Carolina State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 28-22 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates who raised the most money and lost their election. In the 2022 election cycle, 37 of 50 general elections were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

State Senate candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election

This information comes from candidate reports to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE) covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Oct. 22, 2022.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Wesley Meredith – $747,408 – District 19 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Mark Speed – $351,494 – District 11 (Lost general 45% – 55%)
  • E.C. Sykes – $211,032 – District 18 (Lost general 46% – 51%)
  • Frank McNeill – $187,847 – District 21 (Lost general 45% – 55%)
  • Milton F. Fitch Jr. – $91,152 – District 4 (Lost general 43% – 57%)

State Senate candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE) covering the period of Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Tess Judge – $2,939,372 – District 1 (Lost general 45% – 55%)
  • Terri LeGrand – $2,718,801 – District 31 (Lost general 47% – 53%)
  • J.D. Wooten – $2,285,398 – District 24 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Donna Lake – $2,028,833 – District 7 (Lost general 45% – 55%)
  • Harper Peterson – $1,569,335 – District 9 (Lost general 49% – 51%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE). Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These North Carolina State House candidates raised the most money and lost

Elections for all 120 seats in the North Carolina House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 69-51 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates who raised the most money and lost their election. In the 2022 election cycle, 85 of 120 general elections were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

House candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election

This information comes from candidate reports to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE) covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Oct. 22, 2022.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Brian Farkas – $733,174 – District 9 (Lost general 49% – 51%)
  • Al Platt – $323,784 – District 119 (Lost general 46% – 54%)
  • Howard Hunter III – $302,411 – District 5 (Lost general 46% – 54%)
  • Amy Block DeLoach – $297,106 – District 20 (Lost general 49% – 51%)
  • Ricky Hurtado – $250,751 – District 63 (Lost general 49% – 51%)

House candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE) covering the period of Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Nicole Quick – $1,324,768 – District 59 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Aimy Steele – $1,302,257 – District 82 (Lost general 47% – 53%)
  • Emily Nicholson – $1,177,294 – District 1 (Lost general 46% – 54%)
  • Sydney Batch – $1,119,469 – District 37 (Lost general 47% – 50%)
  • Christy Clark – $971,827 – District 98 (Lost general 48% – 52%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE). Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Thirteen of 20 North Carolina State Senate committee chairs raised less money than the average member this cycle

Elections for all 50 seats in the North Carolina State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 28-22 majority heading into the election.

Committee chair fundraising

State legislative committee chairs set a committee’s legislative agenda. Some committee chairs raise significantly more money than their non-chair counterparts in the state legislature. The average amount raised by delegates who did not serve as a committee chair was $261,869. The funds raised by each of the State Senate’s 20 committee chairs are shown below.

  • Agriculture, Energy, and Environment Committee – Brent Jackson – $1,068,354
  • Agriculture, Energy, and Environment Committee – Norman Sanderson – $151,212
  • Agriculture, Energy, and Environment Committee – Chuck Edwards – $19,562
  • Alcoholic Beverage Control Committee – Timothy Moffitt – $114,465
  • Appropriations on Agriculture, Natural and Economic Resources Committee – Todd Johnson – $459,196
  • Appropriations on Agriculture, Natural and Economic Resources Committee – Norman Sanderson – $151,212
  • Appropriations on Agriculture, Natural and Economic Resources Committee – Chuck Edwards – $19,562
  • Appropriations on Department of Transportation Committee – Tom McInnis – $1,155,432
  • Appropriations on Department of Transportation Committee – Vickie Sawyer – $198,572
  • Appropriations on Education/Higher Education Committee – Michael Lee – $1,592,554
  • Appropriations on Education/Higher Education Committee – Deanna Ballard – $156,356
  • Appropriations on General Government and Information Technology Committee – Ted Alexander – $147,171
  • Appropriations on General Government and Information Technology Committee – Carl Ford – $42,106
  • Appropriations/Base Budget Committee – Brent Jackson – $1,068,354
  • Appropriations/Base Budget Committee – Ralph Hise – $154,221
  • Appropriations/Base Budget Committee – Kathy Harrington – $35,540
  • Commerce and Insurance Committee – Tom McInnis – $1,155,432
  • Commerce and Insurance Committee – Todd Johnson – $459,196
  • Commerce and Insurance Committee – Chuck Edwards – $19,562
  • Education/Higher Education Committee – Michael Lee – $1,592,554
  • Education/Higher Education Committee – Deanna Ballard – $156,356
  • Health Care Committee – Jim Perry – $975,725
  • Health Care Committee – Jim Burgin – $267,418
  • Health Care Committee – Joyce Krawiec – $107,297
  • Pensions and Retirement and Aging Committee – Deanna Ballard – $156,356
  • Pensions and Retirement and Aging Committee – Joyce Krawiec – $107,297
  • Pensions and Retirement and Aging Committee – Kathy Harrington – $35,540
  • Redistricting and Elections Committee – Paul Newton – $230,085
  • Redistricting and Elections Committee – Ralph Hise – $154,221
  • Redistricting and Elections Committee – Warren Daniel – $98,501
  • Rules and Operations of the Senate Committee – William Rabon – $419,890
  • Senate Appropriations on Health and Human Services Committee – Jim Perry – $975,725
  • Senate Appropriations on Health and Human Services Committee – Jim Burgin – $267,418
  • Senate Appropriations on Health and Human Services Committee – Joyce Krawiec – $107,297
  • Senate Appropriations on Justice and Public Safety Committee – Danny Earl Britt – $204,869
  • Senate Appropriations on Justice and Public Safety Committee – Warren Daniel – $98,501
  • Senate Finance Committee – William Rabon – $419,890
  • Senate Finance Committee – Paul Newton – $230,085
  • Senate Finance Committee – Warren Daniel – $98,501
  • Senate Judiciary Committee – Danny Earl Britt – $204,869
  • Senate Judiciary Committee – Norman Sanderson – $151,212
  • Senate State and Local Government Committee – Ted Alexander – $147,171
  • Senate State and Local Government Committee – Carl Ford – $42,106
  • Senate Transportation Committee – Tom McInnis – $1,155,432
  • Senate Transportation Committee – Danny Earl Britt – $204,869
  • Senate Transportation Committee – Vickie Sawyer – $198,572

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE). Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Thirty-four of 54 North Carolina House committee chairs raised less money than the average member this cycle

Elections for all 120 seats in the North Carolina House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 69-51 majority heading into the election.

Committee chair fundraising

State legislative committee chairs set a committee’s legislative agenda. Some committee chairs raise significantly more money than their non-chair counterparts in the state legislature. The average amount raised by delegates who did not serve as a committee chair was $151,704. The funds raised by each of the House’s 54 committee chairs are shown below.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE). Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These are the results in the top five most expensive North Carolina State Senate elections

General elections for all 50 districts in the North Carolina State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Of the 50 districts up for election in 2022, 37 had a general election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested general elections, candidates raised $16.3 million. Incumbents raised an average of $367,886 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $105,051 per candidate.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five general elections with the most fundraising in the State Senate. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 18 $2,437,500 Sarah Crawford (D) Mary Wills Bode, E.C. Sykes, and Ryan Brown
District 17 $1,873,286 Sydney Batch (D) Sydney Batch, Mark Cavaliero, and Patrick Bowersox
District 7 $1,748,349 Jim Perry (R) Michael Lee, Marcia Morgan, and Jason Minnicozzi
District 26 $1,426,890 Dave Craven (R) Phil Berger and Alvin Robinson
District 21 $1,343,279 Ben Clark (D) Tom McInnis and Frank McNeill

The officeholders above are listed for the current districts they hold. However, this is a redistricting year, so candidates have been identified below as incumbents even if they are running in a different district than they currently hold.

#1 District 18 – $2,437,500

Mary Wills Bode raised $2,226,178, E.C. Sykes raised $211,032, and Ryan Brown raised $290.

Mary Wills Bode won with 51 percent of the vote, E.C. Sykes received 46 percent of the vote, and Ryan Brown received 3 percent of the vote.

#2 District 17 – $1,873,286

Incumbent Sydney Batch raised $1,816,525, Mark Cavaliero raised $56,246, and Patrick Bowersox raised $515.

Sydney Batch won with 52 percent of the vote, Mark Cavaliero received 46 percent of the vote, and Patrick Bowersox received 2 percent of the vote.

#3 District 7 – $1,748,349

Incumbent Michael Lee raised $1,592,554, Jason Minnicozzi raised $110,656, and Marcia Morgan raised $45,139.

Michael Lee won with 51 percent of the vote, Marcia Morgan received 49 percent of the vote, and Jason Minnicozzi withdrew.

#4 District 26 – $1,426,890

Incumbent Phil Berger raised $1,426,890 and Alvin Robinson raised $0.

Phil Berger won with 100 percent of the vote and Alvin Robinson received 0 percent of the vote.

#5 District 21 – $1,343,279

Incumbent Tom McInnis raised $1,155,432 and Frank McNeill raised $187,847.

Tom McInnis won with 55 percent of the vote and Frank McNeill received 45 percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE). Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These are the results in the top five most expensive North Carolina State House elections

General elections for all 120 districts in the North Carolina House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Of the 120 districts up for election in 2022, 85 had a general election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested general elections, candidates raised $15.3 million. Incumbents raised an average of $128,916 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $54,765 per candidate.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five general elections with the most fundraising in the House of Representatives. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 9 $1,462,461 Brian Farkas (D) Brian Farkas and Timothy Reeder
District 35 $1,137,859 Terence Everitt (D) Terence Everitt, Fred Von Canon, and Joseph Serio
District 63 $776,187 Ricky Hurtado (D) Stephen M. Ross and Ricky Hurtado
District 5 $722,752 Howard Hunter III (D) Bill Ward and Howard Hunter III
District 20 $671,004 Ted Davis Jr. (R) Ted Davis Jr. and Amy Block DeLoach

The officeholders above are listed for the current districts they hold. However, this is a redistricting year, so candidates have been identified below as incumbents even if they are running in a different district than they currently hold.

#1 District 9 – $1,462,461

Incumbent Brian Farkas raised $733,174 and Timothy Reeder raised $729,287.

Brian Farkas received and Timothy Reeder received.

#2 District 35 – $1,137,859

Incumbent Terence Everitt raised $1,033,697, Fred Von Canon raised $103,922, and Joseph Serio raised $240.

Terence Everitt won with 52 percent of the vote, Fred Von Canon received 46 percent of the vote, and Joseph Serio received 2 percent of the vote.

#3 District 63 – $776,187

Incumbent Ricky Hurtado raised $250,751 and Stephen M. Ross raised $525,436.

Stephen M. Ross won with 51 percent of the vote and Ricky Hurtado received 49 percent of the vote.

#4 District 5 – $722,752

Incumbent Howard Hunter III raised $302,411 and Bill Ward raised $420,341.

Bill Ward won with 54 percent of the vote and Howard Hunter III received 46 percent of the vote.

#5 District 20 – $671,004

Incumbent Ted Davis Jr. raised $373,898 and Amy Block DeLoach raised $297,106.

Ted Davis Jr. won with 51 percent of the vote and Amy Block DeLoach received 49 percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE). Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



U.S. Supreme Court to hear oral argument Dec. 7 on elections case

The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral argument in Moore v. Harper on Dec. 7, the last day of its’ December sitting.

Moore v. Harper concerns the elections clause in Article I, section 4 of the Constitution and whether state legislatures alone are empowered by the Constitution to regulate federal elections without oversight from state courts.

The petitioner—North Carolina House of Representatives Speaker Tim Moore (R)—presented to the court the following question: “Whether a State’s judicial branch may nullify the regulations governing the ‘Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives . . . prescribed . . . by the Legislature thereof,’ U.S. CONST. art. I, § 4, cl. 1, and replace them with regulations of the state courts’ own devising, based on vague state constitutional provisions purportedly vesting the state judiciary with power to prescribe whatever rules it deems appropriate to ensure a ‘fair’ or ‘free’ election.

Below is a timeline of the major developments in the case:

  • November 4, 2021: The North Carolina General Assembly adopted new congressional district boundaries after the 2020 census. Subsequently, a group of Democratic Party-affiliated voters and nonprofit organizations challenged the boundaries in state court, alleging that the new map was a partisan gerrymander that violated the state constitution.
  • February 4, 2022: The North Carolina Supreme Court ruled that the state could not use the map in the 2022 elections and remanded the case to the trial court for further proceedings. The trial court adopted a new congressional map drawn by three court-appointed experts.
  • February 25, 2022: Prior to the state’s May 17 primary, Republican state legislators filed an emergency appeal with the U.S. Supreme Court, asking to halt the state court’s order until SCOTUS could review the case. The court denied the request with Justices Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, and Neil Gorsuch dissenting. In the dissent and in a concurrence by Justice Brett Kavanaugh, the justices stated that the independent state legislature doctrine was an important question for the court to resolve.
  • March 17, 2022: North Carolina House Speaker Moore filed a petition to the Court for a writ of certiorari.
  • June 30, 2022: The U.S. Supreme Court granted review of the case.

Seventy amicus briefs have been filed in the case, with 17 filed in support of the petitioners, 48 filed in support of the respondents, and five in support of neither party. An amicus curiae is a person or group who is not a party to a legal action, but has a strong interest in the matter and has petitioned the court to submit a brief offering relevant information or arguments.

If the court rules in favor of the petitioners, the power and authority to regulate federal elections would become more concentrated in state legislatures and with the federal judiciary in the event of appellate review. When the case was granted, Republicans controlled 54.1% of all state legislative seats nationally, while Democrats held 44.3%. Republicans held a majority in 62 chambers, Democrats held the majority in 36 chambers, and one chamber—the Alaska House of Representatives—was organized under a multipartisan, power-sharing coalition.

Additional reading:



North Carolina Republican candidates have spent $8.7 million more than Democrats

In North Carolina, state-level candidates have spent $61 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 22, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $17.3 million and Republican candidates have spent $26 million. 

North Carolina Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 291 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the North Carolina State Board of Elections. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Mary Wills Bode$1,641,514.18
2.Sydney Batch$1,321,940.51
3.Josh Stein$1,107,601.23
4.Roy Cooper$874,738.37
5.Terence Everitt$674,626.43
6.Jay Chaudhuri$621,928.03
7.Sam Ervin$432,428.95
8.Al Platt$361,871.89
9.Brian Farkas$344,426.97
10.Kirk DeViere$291,988.83

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/22/2022)

During the same time period, 296 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the North Carolina State Board of Elections. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Mark Robinson$1,457,362.69
2.Michael Lee$1,180,425.85
3.Jim Perry$1,148,893.14
4.Brent Jackson$949,987.13
5.Tom McInnis$900,010.93
6.Trey Allen$769,518.09
7.Donnie Harrison$689,674.62
8.Timothy K Moore$643,169.55
9.Tim Reeder$599,747.78
10.John Bell$586,609.68

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina candidate PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

StateReport NameDue Date
North Carolina2022 Semiannual1/28/2022
North Carolina2022 Q1 Plus2/28/2022
North Carolina2022 Semiannual (only candidates not on 2022 ballot)7/29/2022
North Carolina2022 Q3 Plus10/31/2022
North Carolina2022 Q41/11/2023
North Carolina2022 Year End Semiannual (only candidates not on 2022 ballot)1/27/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



All candidates for Wake County Board of Commissioners District 3 in North Carolina complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Wake County Board of Commissioners District 3 in North Carolina — Cheryl Stallings (D) and Irina Comer (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The county commission functions as the county’s primary legislative and policy-making body. County commissioners are tasked with approving the annual budget and setting the property tax rate, enacting ordinances, and regulating zoning and land use. Wake County has seven commissioners who are elected by district. 

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Stallings:           

  • “A healthy and sustainable economy for the people of Wake County. This incudes continued work in Economic Developement as we work to bring good jobs for diverse skill sets throughout the County.”
  • “A healthy and sustainable community for all. This includes working to support a robust system of public schools, public health and mental health services, housing affordability, and safe communities.”
  • “A healthy and sustainable environment for all. This includes staying on track with the County’s renewable energy goals; continued work in preserving and maintaining our open spaces/green spaces, parks/greenways, and family farms; and staying on track with our long range public transportation goals (which include expanded bus services, bus rapid transit, and commuter rail).”

Comer:

  • “Lower taxes. The current Commissioners aim to maximize revenue through taxes and then look for things to spend it on. That approach leads to inefficient government services and a very high tax burden for working families.”
  • “School choice. The Wake County Public School System used to be one of the envies of the country. However, enrollment continues to decline and quality continues to suffer. I believe public education needs competition like any other venture.”
  • “Public safety. Wake County residents deserve to live and work in a community that is safe for them and their families. While I believe firmly in limited government, I also believe that public safety is a core responsibility of county government through which order is enforced and individual rights are respected.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Wake County School Board District 1 in North Carolina complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Wake County School Board District 1 in North Carolina — Cheryl Caulfield andBen Clapsaddle — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

According to the Wake County county public school system website, the school board is made up of nine members who “set policy for the school system implemented by the superintendent and administrative staff. The board also adopts an annual budget proposal that includes its request for local funding from the Wake County Board of Commissioners as well as its plan for using state and federal funds.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Caulfield:        

  • “Teachers need our support. That starts with understanding the real issues, what they need and how to get it. First, we need to listen to our teachers. We pay $100,000’s to consultants, yet teachers are our front-line, and they know what works in the classroom.”
  • “WCPSS needs to focus on our learning loss recovery, and get back to basics; remove the politics in the classroom, and focus on reading, writing, and arithmetic.”
  • “Fiscal responsibility is imperative. We budget for million of dollars on textbooks, but our children do not have textbooks. While our superintendent is the highest paid in the nation, our teachers sit at the low end of the national pay.”

Clapsaddle:

  • “Supporting Teachers and Staff: I will always respect the concerns of our educators, teaching assistants, specialists, support staff, and administrators. They are professionals and deserve a strong support system, continuing professional development, and competitive pay.”
  • “Parental Involvement and Partnership: I want to partner with parents to make sure their needs and concerns are heard and addressed. I believe a school system works best when parents are involved in the policies concerning their children.”
  • “Fair Budgeting I believe in being fiscally responsible, with an openness towards community concerns, and effective resourcing for all Wake County Public Schools.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading: