Tagoklahoma

Stories about Oklahoma

Stitt, Hofmeister face off in Nov. 8 election for governor of Oklahoma

Incumbent Kevin Stitt (R), Joy HofmeisterNatalie Bruno (L), and Ervin Yen (Independent) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for governor of Oklahoma.

Stitt was elected governor in 2018. Stitt has run on his record, saying “the momentum that we’ve created, and the momentum that we have to be a top 10 state—we’re halfway there. And I want to keep that momentum going. It’s unfinished business.” Stitt has campaigned on lowering the cost to do business in the state, improving public education quality, and increasing public safety. Stitt said, “We’ve been holding government accountable. We believe in small government, lower taxes.”

Hofmeister was elected superintendent of public instruction in 2014. Hofmeister has made education the centerpiece of her campaign, saying, “It’s time for an education governor.” Hofmeister has also campaigned on lowering the cost of healthcare and investing in infrastructure. Hofmeister registered as a Democrat on October 7, 2021, when she announced her bid for governor. She was previously registered with the Republican Party. In an interview, she described herself as “an aggressively moderate Democrat.”

Education policy has been a subject of disagreement in the election. In early 2022, Stitt endorsed and promised to sign Senate Bill 1647, which would have allowed eligible public school students to use state funding to pay for education services, including private-school tuition. The Oklahoma State Senate defeated the bill 24-22 in March 2022. Hofmeister opposed the bill. Stitt said, “We’re going to continue to invest in schools, but we want some of that funding to be fungible to fund the student, not necessarily the ZIP code where they ‘belong.’ Some of these school districts have high dropout rates or low test scores. They’re not going to fix themselves from within. We have to allow parents to vote with their feet.”

Hofmeister said, “We can’t afford to have someone profiting and take funds outside for private use when we do not have what we need right now for Oklahoma public school kids.”

At the time of the election, former Gov. Brad Henry (D), who left office in 2011 after serving two consecutive terms, was the last Democrat elected to statewide office in Oklahoma.

This is one of 36 gubernatorial elections taking place in 2022. The governor serves as a state’s top executive official and is the only executive office that is elected in all 50 states. There are currently 28 Republican governors and 22 Democratic governors. 



All candidates for Oklahoma State Senate District 22 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Oklahoma State Senate District 22 — Blake Aguirre (D) and Kristen Thompson (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Oklahoma’s state legislature. Oklahoma is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office? 

Aguirre:       

  • “Healthcare”
  • “Criminal Justice Reform”
  • “EDUCATION”

Thompson:   

  • “Kristen and her husband Bryce have started and grown multiple businesses in the construction and hospitality industry and are proud to have created family-supporting jobs in the Oklahoma City metro area.”
  • “Kristen has seen directly the need for Oklahomans to have access to quality healthcare, including mental health, to improve their lives and the lives of those around them.”
  • “As a mom of three children, two of which are school aged and attend Oklahoma public schools, ensuring our children receive the best education possible is personal to Kristen.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma — incumbent Matt Pinnell (R), Melinda Alizadeh-Ford (D), and Chris Powell (L) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma is an elected constitutional officer, the second-ranking officer of the executive branch and the first officer in line to succeed the Governor of Oklahoma. The lieutenant governor is popularly elected every four years by a plurality and is limited to two terms.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?    

Pinnell:

  • “Stronger Local and Small Businesses: Local employers and small businesses are the engines of our economy and entrepreneurship is the future.”
  • “Expanding Business Recruitment and Tourism: Thanks to the leadership of Governor Stitt and Lt. Governor Pinnell, we are no longer content to stand by and accept the role of a Midwestern flyover state with little to offer industry leaders of the 21st century.”
  • “Protecting Our Families, Defending Our Values: We’ve seen what happens to other states when the people relinquish too much power to big government bureaucrats.”

Alizadeh-Ford:

  • “Transparency – return of Accountability and Oversight.”
  • “Integrity – I will work for Oklahoma, all Oklahomans.”
  • “Aptitude – I have the work and real life experiences and initiative to work with all Oklahomans for the betterment of our state”

Powell:   

  • “The office of Lt. Governor holds almost no responsibility or authority.”
  • “The Secretary of State, a gubernatorial appointee with numerous specified duties, should replace the Lt. Governor in the line of succession if the Governor’s office becomes vacant.”
  • “If elected, while advocating for elimination of the office of Lt. Governor I will refuse the Highway Patrol security detail and employee no more than one staff member.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



Oklahoma marijuana legalization initiative will appear on the ballot on March 7, 2023

Oklahoma voters will decide on State Question 820, an initiative to legalize marijuana, on March 7, 2023.

Oklahomans for Sensible Marijuana Laws, proponents of State Question 820, were initially targeting the 2022 ballot and submitted enough signatures to qualify for the ballot. However, due to legal challenges and statutory deadlines, the measure could not be placed on the 2022 ballot and was set to be voted on at a later election date. On October 18, Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) called a special election for the measure on March 7, 2023.

State Question 820 would legalize marijuana for adults 21 years old and older. The Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority would be responsible for marijuana business licensing and regulations. Individuals would be allowed to possess, transport, and distribute up to one ounce (28.35 grams) of marijuana, eight grams of marijuana in a concentrated form, and/or eight grams or less of concentrated marijuana in marijuana-infused products. Marijuana sales would be taxed at 15%. Under State Question 820, individuals could possess up to six mature marijuana plants and up to six seedlings. The initiative would also provide a process for individuals to seek the expungement or modification of certain previous marijuana-related convictions or sentences.

Tax revenue generated from marijuana sales would be used to finance the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority’s implementation of the initiative with the remaining funds to be appropriated as follows:

  • 30% to the state general fund;
  • 30% to grants for public school programs to support student retention and performance, after-school and enrichment programs, and substance abuse prevention programs;
  • 20% to grants for government agencies and not-for-profit organizations to fund drug addiction treatment and overdose prevention programs;
  • 10% to the state judicial revolving fund; and
  • 10% to the municipalities or counties where the marijuana was sold.

In 2020, Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) ordered State Question 802, a Medicaid expansion initiative, to appear on the June 30 primary ballot rather than the November 3 general election ballot. In 2018, Gov. Mary Fallin (R) placed State Question 788, a medical marijuana initiative, on the June primary ballot. Prior to 2018, a governor had not selected a date different from the general election for an initiative since 2005.

As of October 2022, 19 states and Washington, D.C., had legalized the possession and personal use of marijuana for recreational purposes.

  • In 11 states and D.C., the ballot initiative process was used to legalize marijuana.
  • In one state, the legislature referred a measure to the ballot for voter approval.
  • In seven states, bills to legalize marijuana were enacted into law.

In November 2022, five more states will decide on marijuana legalization ballot measures. In the central U.S., voters in Arkansas, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota will consider citizen-initiated measures to legalize marijuana. These four states are Republican trifectas. In Maryland, which has a divided government, the state Legislature voted to put the issue before voters.

Marijuana legalization initiatives targeting the 2023 and 2024 ballots have also been filed in Ohio, Wyoming, Florida, and Nebraska and could be filed in Idaho, Mississippi, Nebraska, and Utah.

As of October 20, two statewide ballot measures were certified for the ballot in two states for elections in 2023. From 2011 to 2021, an average of 33 statewide ballot measures — five initiated measures and 28 referred measures — appeared on ballots in odd-numbered years.



All candidates for Oklahoma House of Representatives District 79 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Oklahoma House of Representatives District 79 — incumbent Melissa Provenzano (D) and Paul Hassink (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Oklahoma’s state legislature. Oklahoma is one of 23 states with a Republican party trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Provenzano:           

  • “Legislator. Educator. Bipartisan Problem Solver.”
  • “Education is the rising tide that lifts all ships.”
  • “Proven track record of solving constituent issues, reaching across the aisle to get problems solved and bills passed”

Hassink:           

  • “As an experienced businessman, I understand the how to build a strong economy that supports education, jobs, and infrastructure.”
  • “As a lifelong Christian, I am grounded in conservative values.”
  • “I have lived my life based on the belief that each of us is created in the image and likeness of God.” 

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Oklahoma House of Representatives elections, 2022



Oklahoma marijuana initiative will not be on 2022 ballot but will be decided at a later election

On September 21, the Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled that State Question 820, an initiative to legalize marijuana, could not be placed on the 2022 general election ballot because legal challenges were still pending and the question could not be printed in time for the state to meet its deadline of mailing absentee ballots.

The court’s order said the measure will be decided on at a later election date, either November 5, 2024, or at a special election. The governor can call special elections for ballot questions.

In August, the Oklahoma secretary of state announced that Oklahomans for Sensible Marijuana Laws, the campaign behind the measure, submitted a sufficient number of signatures to qualify the measure for the ballot.

Following signature verification, there was a period for legal challenges to be filed contesting the ballot measure. The challenge period for State Question 820 began on September 1 and ended on September 15, 2022. Two challenges were filed related to the validity of signatures submitted for the initiative and two challenges were filed related to the initiative’s ballot language. The state Supreme Court rejected the signature validity challenges and denied motions requesting rehearings. The court also rejected the ballot language challenges; however, the plaintiffs can request rehearings.

After the challenges have been resolved, the secretary of state notifies the governor, who issues an election proclamation. The governor’s election proclamation must be issued and certified to the State Election Board at least 70 days before an election for a state question to appear on a ballot. Election Board Secretary Paul Ziriax said August 29 (70 days before the general election) was the deadline to formally certify measures for the ballot. Additionally, the deadline to print and mail absentee voters is 45 days before the general election, which is September 24.

Proponents filed a lawsuit in the state Supreme Court to expedite the ballot title verification process and include the measure on the November 2022 ballot, arguing that “The new [signature verification] process took about 48 days from the time we turned in our signatures until the time they were verified. In the past, that was usually about two weeks or a little longer. It’s been a new process for them, which has caused a lot of missteps along the way. They have dropped the ball, which is why we have asked the Supreme Court to intervene.”

On September 21, 2022, the Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled 9-0 that proponents “have no clear legal right and [elections officials] have no plain legal duty to put SQ 820 on the November 8, 2022, general election ballot” unless it has met all statutory requirements and that “SQ 820 cannot be printed on ballots in time to comply with the deadline for mailing ballots to absentee voters.”

Marijuana legalization measures are certified to appear on the 2022 ballot in Arkansas, Maryland, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Votes on the Arkansas initiative may not be counted pending a state Supreme Court ruling.



Challenge period for Oklahoma marijuana initiative ends with four challenges filed; state supreme court to decide on whether the initiative will appear on the 2022 ballot

A 10-day challenge period for Oklahoma marijuana initiative State Question 820 ended on September 15 with four challenges filed with the state Supreme Court. In addition to resolving the challenges, the Supreme Court is also set to decide on whether the measure will be placed on the November 2022 ballot.

Once signatures for an initiative are submitted, the secretary of state’s office counts the signatures and submits a report to the court. On August 22, the secretary of state announced that proponents submitted 117,257 valid signatures and forwarded the signature count report to the Oklahoma Supreme Court. After the supreme court determines the sufficiency of signatures, the court orders the secretary of state to publish a notice of the signature submission, the ballot title, and notice that any citizen may file a petition challenging the sufficiency of the signatures or ballot title within 10 days.

The challenge period for State Question 820 began on September 1 and ended on September 15, 2022. Two challenges were filed related to the validity of signatures submitted for the initiative and two challenges were filed related to the initiative’s ballot language.

Former Oklahoma State Rep. Mike Reynolds (R) and former gubernatorial candidate Paul Tay (I) filed lawsuits with the Oklahoma Supreme Court challenging the validity of signatures submitted by proponents. Reynolds argued that the validity of signatures cannot be reviewed without taking legal action to review them and requested a signature review period. Tay argued that signatures collected on American Indian lands should be invalidated. Attorneys for initiative sponsors said, “As this Court is aware, ballot deadlines are looming, and time is of the essence here. Proponents thus respectfully request that the Court resolve the instant challenge quickly, to ensure that SQ820 may be submitted to a vote of the People at the upcoming November 2022 general election.”

A challenge to the initiative’s ballot language was filed by John Stotts, a former member of the Pottawatomie County Farm Bureau board of directors; Karma Robinson, president of public affairs and political communications firm GR Pro; and Mary Chris Barth, a current member of the Beaver County Farm Bureau’s board of directors. The challenge alleged that the ballot language is misleading because it fails to mention that “several laws protecting children from marijuana would be removed,” “possession of a firearm while under the influence of marijuana would be legalized,” and “more serious marijuana crimes would be legalized or decriminalized.”

A second challenge to the ballot language was filed by Oklahomans for Responsible Cannabis Action director Jed Green, sponsor of other proposed marijuana initiatives for which no signatures were submitted by the August deadline. Green alleged that State Question 820’s ballot language is misleading because it fails to mention that the initiative could be amended by the state legislature if approved by voters, public consumption fines would be limited to $25, and that medical marijuana dispensaries would need a second license to sell adult-use marijuana.

After an initiative petition is found to have sufficient signatures and all challenges have been resolved, the secretary of state notifies the governor, who issues an election proclamation. The governor’s election proclamation must be issued and certified to the State Election Board at least 70 days prior to an election in order for a state question to appear on a ballot. Election Board Secretary Paul Ziriax said August 29 (70 days prior to the general election) was the deadline to formally certify measures for the ballot.

State Question 820 sponsors asked the Oklahoma Supreme Court to expedite the ballot title verification process and include the measure on the November 2022 ballot, saying that “The new process took about 48 days from the time we turned in our signatures until the time they were verified. In the past, that was usually about two weeks or a little longer. It’s been a new process for them, which has caused a lot of missteps along the way. They have dropped the ball, which is why we have asked the Supreme Court to intervene.” The state argued for the measure to be placed on the ballot for a later election — either a special election if one is called or the 2024 ballot.

In a press release published on September 16, the State Question 820 campaign said proponents “remain optimistic that the Oklahoma Supreme Court will act swiftly to dismiss the seemingly politically motivated challenges, and let the people vote.”

Marijuana legalization measures are certified to appear on the 2022 ballot in Arkansas, Maryland, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Votes on the Arkansas initiative may not be counted pending a state Supreme Court ruling.



Campaign for marijuana legalization initiative submits signatures in Oklahoma

In Oklahoma, the campaign behind a marijuana legalization initiative reported submitting 164,000 signatures for the ballot measure on July 5, 2022. Michelle Tilley, the campaign director, said, “The overwhelming number of signatures we have received demonstrates that our campaign has the momentum.” Of the signatures submitted, 94,911 signatures must be valid for the initiative to appear on the ballot in November.

Titled State Question 820, the ballot initiative would legalize the possession, transportation, and distribution of up to one ounce (28.35 grams) of marijuana, eight grams of marijuana in a concentrated form, and/or eight grams or less of concentrated marijuana in marijuana-infused products. Sales would be taxed at 15%. Under State Question 820, individuals could possess up to six mature marijuana plants and up to six seedlings. The initiative would also provide a process for individuals to seek the expungement or modification of certain previous marijuana-related convictions or sentences.

Revenue generated from marijuana sales taxes would be appropriated as follows:

  • 30% to the state General Fund;
  • 30% to grants for public school programs to support student retention and performance, after-school and enrichment programs, and substance abuse prevention programs;
  • 20% to grants for government agencies and not-for-profit organizations to fund drug addiction treatment and overdose prevention programs;
  • 10% to the state judicial revolving fund; and
  • 10% to the municipalities or counties where the marijuana was sold.

In 2018, voters approved a ballot measure to establish a medical marijuana program. The vote was 56.86% – 43.14%.

As of June 2022, 19 states and Washington, D.C., had legalized the possession and personal use of marijuana for recreational purposes. Of these 19, 11 states and D.C. had legalized marijuana through the ballot initiative process.

From 1985 to 2020, a total of 17 citizen-initiated measures were on state ballots in Oklahoma. Voters approved 52.94% (9 of 17) of the measures and rejected 47.06% (8 of 17) were defeated.



Mullin and Shannon advance to Aug. 23 special runoff for U.S. Senate in Oklahoma

Markwayne Mullin and T.W. Shannon advanced to an August 23, 2022, Republican primary runoff in the special U.S. Senate election in Oklahoma. Neither received the majority of the primary vote needed to win outright on June 28.

Ten candidates ran in the primary. The special election will fill the rest of the six-year term left by Sen. Jim Inhofe (R), who was last elected in 2020. Inhofe announced he would resign January 3, 2023, to spend time with family.

Mullin, Shannon, Nathan Dahm, Scott Pruitt, and Luke Holland led in polling, noteworthy endorsements, and media attention.

Mullin has represented Oklahoma’s 2nd Congressional District since 2013. He campaigned on making the country energy independent, lowering inflation, and defending the Second Amendment. Mullin said, “I entered the race for Senate because the people of Oklahoma deserve a Senator who will fight for their conservative values. I am a Christian, a family man and a proud supporter of President Trump and I will always fight for the America First policies that Oklahomans have been desperately missing during Joe Biden’s failed time in office.”

Shannon is the CEO of Chickasaw Community Bank in Oklahoma City. He previously served as a member of the Oklahoma House of Representatives from 2006 to 2014. Shannon campaigned on opposing taxpayer-funded abortion, protecting the U.S. Constitution, and lowering taxes to create jobs. Shannon said he was running to “push back against this woke agenda” because “what made this country great is our constitution, capitalism and Christianity, and all three of those are under attack.” Former Vice Presidential and current U.S. House candidate Sarah Palin (R) endorsed Shannon.

Dahm is a member of the Oklahoma State Senate, a position to which he was first elected in 2011. Dahm campaigned on election integrity, protecting the Second Amendment, and term limits for members of U.S. Congress. Dahm said, “I’m running for the United States Senate because, like you, I am tired of the spineless politicians who turned their backs on President Donald J. Trump. We need proven Republican fighters, and I’ve proven I’ll never back down.” U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R) endorsed Dahm.

Holland was Inhofe’s chief of staff until he resigned in February 2022 to run for U.S. Senate. He began working with Inhofe in 2009 as a staff assistant. Holland campaigned on standing up to China and stopping what he described as a rush to socialism. Holland said, “As your next senator, I will continue the Inhofe legacy of defending our Christian values, fighting socialism, rebuilding our military and standing up to China.” Inhofe endorsed Holland.

Pruitt served as the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under former President Donald Trump (R) from 2017 to 2018. Prior to that, he served as the Oklahoma Attorney General from 2011 to 2017. He campaigned on energy independence, securing the border, fighting what he calls Big Tech, and stopping inflation. Pruitt said: “I think Oklahomans know that I’m going to fight for their values, I think they know that I exhibited courage in working with the president historically to get things done and I think they know that I’ve also engaged in leadership and civility. I believe very strongly that we’ll have the resources that we need.” Former Secretary of Energy and former Governor of Texas Rick Perry (R) endorsed Pruitt.

Alex Gray, Randy Grellner, Adam Holley, Laura Moreno, Paul Royse, and John Tompkins also ran in the election.

As of June 29, 2022, 16 special elections have been called during the 117th Congress. From the 113th Congress to the 116th Congress, 50 special elections were held.



Drummond defeats incumbent O’Connor in Republican primary for attorney general of Oklahoma

Gentner Drummond defeated incumbent John O’Connor in the Republican primary for attorney general of Oklahoma on June 28, 2022. Libertarian candidate Lynda Steele is running in the general election, but no Democratic candidates filed to run. According to Ben Felder in The Oklahoman, “Libertarians have never won a statewide race in Oklahoma, giving the Republican primary winner a sizable advantage in November.” Republicans have held the office of Oklahoma attorney general since voters elected Scott Pruitt (R) to the position in 2010.

Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) appointed O’Connor to the office on July 23, 2021, to succeed Mike Hunter (R). Hunter—who was elected in 2018—resigned on June 1, 2021, after The Oklahoman inquired about whether he was having an extramarital affair.

Drummond ran for attorney general in 2018 and advanced from that year’s Republican primary with 38.5% of the vote to Hunter’s 44.5%. In the primary runoff, Hunter defeated Drummond by 273 votes, 50.05% to 49.95%. Drummond served as a pilot and instructor in the U.S. Air Force during the Gulf War. His professional experience included owning The Drummond Law Firm and serving as a principal shareholder and director of Blue Sky Bank. Drummond said on his campaign website that “As attorney general, he will defend our rights, uphold the rule of law, and serve the people of Oklahoma, not the political elite.”

O’Connor’s professional experience included being a founding shareholder in the law firm of Newton, O’Connor, Turner & Ketchum, P.C. and working as an attorney at Hall, Estill, Hardwick, Gable, Golden & Nelson, P.C. President Donald Trump (R) nominated O’Connor for a federal judgeship in 2018 but his nomination was returned by the U.S. Senate before the conclusion of the 115th United States Congress, and he withdrew from consideration for re-nomination in 2019. During the campaign, O’Connor highlighted his efforts as state attorney general against some Biden administration policies, including joining lawsuits against vaccine and mask mandates.

Before the primary, Felder described the race this way: “One attorney general candidate is running on his close working relationship with the governor and his fidelity to the former president, while his challenger has presented himself as an independent who would serve as a check on state government power.”

During the campaign, both candidates criticized the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in McGirt v. Oklahoma but differed on how the state should proceed. In July 2020, the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to reverse a decision by the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals and ruled that holding that under the Indian Major Crimes Act, lands reserved for the Creek Nation in eastern Oklahoma constituted Indian Country and that the state of Oklahoma could not legally try a Creek citizen for criminal conduct in state court. It confirmed that a large portion of eastern Oklahoma are Indian reservations and not under the state’s law enforcement jurisdiction.

Drummond said he would work with the tribes in that area to develop a solution to jurisdictional issues. At a campaign forum, Drummond said, “The Supreme Court has ruled. That was two years ago. For two years we have not had a solution in the state of Oklahoma. … What must be resolved right now is a collaboration with the Native American tribes. O’Connor said that he has met with leaders from four of the six main tribes in the area and would still continue to pursue legal action on cases related to tribal jurisdictional matters. He also said, “Job number one is to protect the sovereignty of the state of Oklahoma.”

Before the primary, a June 2022 poll of 400 likely Republican primary voters by Amber Integrated found Drummond leading O’Connor, 41% to 28%, with 30% undecided. The margin of error was +/- 4.9 percentage points. An earlier poll of 455 likely Republican primary voters also conducted by Amber Integrated in March showed Drummond with 37% support, O’Connor with 16%, and 47% undecided, with a margin of error of 4.6 percentage points.

Additional reading: