Tagschool board elections

Candidate filing period to pass in five states

The filing deadlines to run for state-level offices in Alaska, Kansas, Wisconsin, Hawaii, and Minnesota will pass next week. Alaska’s, Kansas’, and Wisconsin’s filing deadlines will pass on June 1. The filing deadlines in Hawaii and Minnesota will pass on June 2.

Alaska
In Alaska, prospective candidates may file for the following state offices:
  • State Senate (10 seats)
  • State House (40 seats)
  • Additionally, Alaska will hold retention elections for one supreme court justice and one court of appeals justice.
Kansas
In Kansas, prospective candidates may file for the following state offices:
  • State Board of Education (5 seats)
  • State Senate (40 seats)
  • State House (125 seats)
  • Additionally, Kansas will hold retention elections for one supreme court justice and six court of appeals justices.

Ballotpedia is also covering local offices in Sedgwick County, Kansas.

Wisconsin
In Wisconsin, prospective candidates may file for the following state offices:
  • State Senate (16 seats)
  • State House (99 seats)
Hawaii
In Hawaii, prospective candidates may file for the following state offices:
  • Office of Hawaiian Affairs (4 seats)
  • State Senate (13 seats)
  • State House (51 seats)

Ballotpedia is also covering local offices in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Minnesota
In Minnesota, prospective candidates may file for the following state offices:
  • State Senate (67 seats)
  • State House (134 seats)
  • Supreme Court (2 seats)
  • Court of Appeals (6 seats)
Ballotpedia is also covering local offices in the following areas:
  • Minneapolis Public Schools (4 seats)
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Hennepin County, Minnesota
  • Ramsey County, Minnesota

Kansas’ primary is scheduled for August 4, and Hawaii’s primary is scheduled for August 8. Minnesota and Wisconsin’s primaries are scheduled for August 11. Alaska’s primary will be held on August 18. The general elections in all five states are scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Alaska, Kansas, Wisconsin, Hawaii, and Minnesota’s statewide filing deadlines are the 41st, 42nd, 43rd, 44th, and 45th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on June 11 in Connecticut.

Hawaii has a Democratic state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers. Alaska, Kansas, Wisconsin, and Minnesota have a divided government where no party holds a trifecta.

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California school board recall to be held Tuesday

A recall election seeking to remove Leanne Ibarra and Jose Lara from their positions on the El Rancho Unified School District Board of Education in California is scheduled for June 2, 2020. The election is being conducted by mail-in ballot in response to the coronavirus pandemic. The candidate filing deadline passed on March 6; Allan Maciel and Joseph Rivera filed to run for Lara’s position, and Esther Mejia filed to run for Ibarra’s position.

Although Ibarra is still contesting the recall effort, Lara resigned from his seat effective February 5, 2020. At a school board meeting on January 21, Lara said he was leaving in order to focus on his family while his son recuperated from an illness. His name will still be on the recall election ballot, and if a majority of voters cast ballots to retain him, the school board will appoint his replacement.

The recall effort began in May 2019. Recall supporters listed a number of concerns with the board, including a vote to notify 23 administrators they could be fired or reassigned, a vote to demote, transfer, or release six administrators, and the alleged mismanagement of a $200 million bond. In an interview with the Whittier Daily News, Lara responded and said, “The community of Pico Rivera has been driven along a misinformation campaign. They’ve only heard one side of the story.”

Lara was first elected to the five-member board on November 5, 2013, and Ibarra was first elected on November 6, 2018. Before Lara resigned, he and Ibarra were members of a three-person majority on the board, according to the Whittier Daily News. The third member of the majority, Gabriel Orosco, was not included in the recall effort since his term is up for election in 2020. The other two board members support the recall effort. To get the recall on the ballot, recall supporters had to collect at least 6,509 signatures by October 23, 2019.

In 2019, Ballotpedia covered a total of 151 recall efforts against 230 elected officials. Of the 66 officials whose recalls made it to the ballot, 34 were recalled for a rate of 52%. That was lower than the 63% rate and 57% rate for 2018 and 2017 recalls, respectively.

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Voters decide municipal and school board races in Chesapeake and Norfolk, Virginia

Chesapeake and Norfolk, Virginia, held nonpartisan general elections for municipal and school board offices on May 19, 2020.

Candidates ran in elections for the following offices:

Mayor of Chesapeake
• Incumbent Richard West defeated Lenard Myers, Steffanie Aubuchon, and Palmer Smith.

Chesapeake City Council
• Don Carey III and incumbents S.Z. Ritter and Robert Ike won at-large seats on the nine-member council.

Chesapeake School Board
• Angie Swygert and incumbents Samuel Boone, Victoria Proffitt, and Tom Mercer won at-large seats on the nine-member school board.

Mayor of Norfolk
• Incumbent Kenny Alexander ran unopposed.

Norfolk City Council
• Incumbents Andria McClellan and Angelia Williams Graves won re-election to their city council seats in Superwards 6 and 7, respectively. Both ran unopposed.

Norfolk School Board
• Incumbents Noelle Gabriel and Rodney Jordan won re-election to the school board in Superwards 6 and 7, respectively.

Norfolk and Chesapeake are the second- and third-most populous cities in Virginia and the 80th- and 90th-most populous in the U.S.

Together, the Norfolk and Chesapeake school districts served a total of 71,422 students during the 2017-2018 school year.

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Nebraska’s primaries to conclude May 12

The statewide primary for Nebraska is on May 12, 2020. In reaction to the coronavirus pandemic, every eligible voter received an absentee ballot application by mail. In-person locations are expected to remain open as planned. The filing deadline to run passed on March 2.

Candidates are running in elections for the following offices:
  • U.S. Senate (1 seat)
  • U.S. House (3 seats)
  • Public Service Commissioner
  • State Board of Regents (2 seats)
  • State Board of Education (4 seats)
  • State Senate (25 seats)
  • State Supreme Court (2 seats)
  • State Court of Appeals (2 seats)
Ballotpedia is also covering local elections in the following areas:
  • Douglas County
  • Lancaster County
  • Omaha
  • Westside Community Schools

Candidates are competing to advance to the general election scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Nebraska’s primary is the ninth statewide primary to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next primary is on May 19 in Oregon.

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Statewide filing deadline approaches in Michigan

The major party filing deadline to run for elected office in Michigan is on April 21, 2020. In Michigan, prospective candidates may file for the following offices:
• U.S. Senate (1 seat)
• U.S. House (all 14 seats)
• State Board of Education (2 seats)
• University of Michigan Board of Regents (2 seats)
• Michigan State University Board of Trustees (2 seats)
• Wayne State University Board of Governors (2 seats)
• Michigan House of Representatives (all 110 seats)

Ballotpedia is also covering local elections in the following areas:
• Wayne County, Michigan
• Detroit Public Schools Community District
• Dearborn Public Schools
• Ann Arbor Public Schools

The primary is scheduled for August 4, 2020, and the general election is scheduled for November 3, 2020.

The filing deadline has so far been unaffected by the coronavirus pandemic. Ballotpedia is tracking changes in election dates, procedures, and administration.

Michigan’s statewide filing deadline is the 35th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on April 24 in Florida.

Michigan has a divided government, which means that no party holds a state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.

Additional Reading:
Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Michigan
United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan, 2020
United States Senate election in Michigan, 2020
Michigan state executive official elections, 2020
Michigan House of Representatives elections, 2020



Candidate filing period for state and local races to end in Arizona, North Dakota, and Oklahoma

The major-party filing deadlines to run for state elected office in three states are coming up in the next week. Arizona’s and North Dakota’s filing deadlines are on April 6, and Oklahoma’s filing deadline is on April 10.

In Arizona, prospective candidates may file for the following state offices:
  • Corporation Commission (3 seats)
  • State Senate (30 seats)
  • State House (60 seats)
Ballotpedia is also covering Arizona local elections in the following areas, though the filing deadline for these offices is not until July 6:
  • Phoenix
  • Mesa
  • Chandler
  • Glendale
  • Gilbert
  • Scottsdale
  • Maricopa County
  • Pima County
  • 42 school districts
In North Dakota, prospective candidates may file for the following state offices:
  • Governor
  • Lieutenant Governor
  • Treasurer
  • State Auditor
  • Commissioner of Insurance
  • Public Service Commissioner
  • Superintendent of Public Instruction
  • State Senate (23 seats)
  • State House (47 seats)
  • Supreme Court (1 seat)
In Oklahoma, prospective candidates may file for the following state offices:
  • Corporation Commissioner
  • State Senate (24 seats)
  • State House (101 seats)
Ballotpedia is also covering Oklahoma local elections in the following areas:
  • Tulsa
  • Oklahoma County
  • Tulsa County
  • Cleveland County
  • Canadian County
  • Osage County
  • 25 school districts (the filing deadline for these elections was December 4, 2019)

Arizona and Oklahoma are also holding retention elections for their state supreme courts and their state intermediate appellate courts on November 3, 2020.

The primary in Arizona is scheduled for August 4, the primary in North Dakota is scheduled for June 9, and the primary in Oklahoma is scheduled for June 30. North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum (R) has authorized counties to conduct the June 9 primary entirely by mail in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The general elections for all three states are scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Arizona’s, North Dakota’s, and Oklahoma’s statewide filing deadlines are the 32nd, 33rd, and 34th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on April 21 in Michigan.

Arizona, North Dakota, and Oklahoma all have Republican state government trifectas. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.



Anchorage to hold elections for city council and school board April 7

The city of Anchorage, Alaska, is holding general elections on April 7 for six city council seats, two school board seats, and 15 special district seats. The elections will be vote-by mail, and all of the races are nonpartisan.

The Anchorage City Council, also known as the Anchorage Assembly, has six of its 11 seats on the ballot in 2020. District 2-Seat C incumbent Fred Dyson was the only assembly incumbent to not file for re-election.
  • District 1 – Seat B: Incumbent Christopher Constant is unopposed in the general election.
  • District 2 – Seat C: Jamie Allard, Roger Branson, and Stephany Jeffers are running in the general election.
  • District 3 – Seat E: Incumbent Austin Quinn-Davidson, Nick Danger, and MoHagani Magnetek are running in the general election.
  • District 4 – Seat G: Incumbent Felix Rivera faces Christine Hill in the general election.
  • District 5 – Seat I: Incumbent Pete Petersen, Monty Dyson, and David Walker are running in the general election.
  • District 6 – Seat K: Incumbent Suzanne LaFrance and Rick Castillo are facing off in the general election.
The Anchorage School District has two of the board’s seven seats on the ballot in 2020. Incumbents Dave Donley and Andy Holleman both filed for re-election.
  • Seat C: Incumbent Dave Donley faces James Smallwood in the general election.
  • Seat D: Incumbent Andy Holleman, JC Cates, and Phil Isley are running in the general election.

In 2020, Ballotpedia is covering elections in 52 of America’s 100 largest cities by population.

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Missouri school board election date changed in response to COVID-19

On March 18, 2020, Gov. Mike Parson (R) released an official statement postponing all Missouri municipal elections until June 2, 2020, amid concerns about the coronavirus pandemic. These elections were originally scheduled to take place on April 7, 2020.

The following Missouri school boards within Ballotpedia’s coverage scope were impacted by this change:

  • Center School District
  • Grandview C-4 School District
  • Hickman Mills C-1 School District
  • Liberty Public Schools
  • North Kansas City Schools
  • Park Hill School District
  • Platte County R-III School District
  • Raytown C-2 School District
  • St. Joseph School District

Prior to Gov. Parson’s statement, five of these school districts—Grandview C-4, Liberty, Park Hill, Platte County R-III, and Raytown C-2—had cancelled their school board elections because the number of qualified candidates who filed to appear on the ballot was equal to the number of seats up for election.

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Virginia local election filing deadline preview

The filing deadline to run for elected office in the city of Richmond and school boards in Virginia is on March 26, 2020.

Ballotpedia is covering local elections in the following areas:
  • Richmond, Virginia (mayor and city council)
  • Chesapeake Public Schools (4 seats)
  • Norfolk Public Schools (2 seats)
  • Virginia Beach City Public Schools (4 seats)

The primary in Virginia is scheduled for June 9, and the general election is scheduled for November 3, 2020.

The filing deadline for other local offices in the cities of Chesapeake and Norfolk was on March 3. The general election for those elections is scheduled for May 5.

In 2020, Ballotpedia is covering elections in 52 of America’s 100 largest cities by population.

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Statewide filing deadline passes in Nebraska

On March 2, the filing deadline passed for non-incumbents to run for elected office in Nebraska. The filing deadline for incumbents previously passed on February 18. Candidates filed for the following offices:

U.S. Senator
• Incumbent Ben Sasse (R) filed to run for re-election.

U.S. House Districts 1, 2, and 3
• Every incumbent filed to run for re-election.

Nebraska State Senate (25 seats)
• The incumbent did not file to run for re-election in Districts 9, 11, 19, 29, 31, and 45.

Public Service Commissioner
• The incumbent filed to run for re-election.

State Board of Education (4 seats)
• The incumbent did not file to run for re-election for State Board of Education Districts 3 and 4.

Ballotpedia is also covering retention elections for the following judicial offices:
• Nebraska Supreme Court (2 seats)
• Nebraska Court of Appeals (2 seats)

Finally, Ballotpedia is covering local elections in the following areas:
• Lancaster County
• Omaha
• Elkhorn Public Schools
• Millard Public Schools
• Norris School District 160
• Omaha Public Schools
• Ralston Public Schools
• Waverly School District 145
• Westside Community Schools

The primary is scheduled for May 12, and the general election is scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Nebraska’s statewide filing deadline was the 14th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next major party statewide filing deadline is on March 6 in Georgia.

Nebraska has a Republican state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers, or in Nebraska’s case, the unicameral Nebraska State Senate.

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