TagState executive

Incumbent Rob Sand and Todd Halbur running for Iowa state auditor on Nov. 8

Incumbent Rob Sand (D) and Todd Halbur (R) are running for Iowa state auditor on Nov. 8, 2022.

Sand has been the Iowa auditor of state since 2019. Sand also served as assistant attorney general under Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller (D). On his campaign website, Sand said he has been non-partisan as auditor: “[Sand] defends the other party from unfair or untruthful attacks, while also criticizing his own party even when he doesn’t have to.” Sand also highlighted his record as auditor, saying he “has identified more waste, fraud, and abuse than any other single term from any other State Auditor.”

Halbur’s professional experience includes working in the banking and finance industry and as a real estate agent. He was also the former CFO of the Iowa Alcoholic Beverages Division. Halbur said he is “a fiscal conservative focused on protecting Iowa’s Taxpayer dollars by following the rule of law instead of being a politician. I will operate the Auditor’s office with integrity, accountability and openness.” Halbur emphasized his professional background, saying, “Iowa needs an Auditor with the financial background and qualifications I have from my previous positions in the banking industry and as a CFO.”

The Iowa Capital Dispatch‘s Kate Kealey described the race as follows: “In the race for state auditor, Democratic incumbent Rob Sand promises voters he will remain committed to serving as the taxpayers’ watchdog, while Republican opponent Todd Halbur believes the job should be separate from partisan disputes.”

In the 2018 election, Sand defeated incumbent Mary Mosiman (R) 51%-46%. Before Sand’s election, Iowa had had a Republican state auditor since 1939.

The auditor is responsible for audits of counties, cities, school districts, and other governmental offices and is required to provide guidelines to CPA firms performing such audits.



Three candidates running for Kansas state treasurer on Nov. 8

Incumbent Lynn Rogers (D), Steven C. Johnson (R), and Steve Roberts (L) are running for Kansas treasurer on Nov. 8, 2022. Rogers and Johnson have led in fundraising and media attention.

Gov. Laura Kelly (D) appointed Rogers Kansas treasurer in 2020, and he assumed office in Jan. 2021. He was the lieutenant governor of Kansas from 2019 to 2021 and represented Kansas State Senate District 25 from 2016 to 2019. Rogers’ career experience includes working as an agriculture banker. Rogers described himself as “a commonsense leader who has a passion for education and improving the lives of average Kansas families” and said he had “a proven track record of working to solve problems for Kansans by finding bipartisan solutions.” Rogers emphasized his experience managing the Kansas Public Employees Retirement System (KPERS), saying, “We put $1.8 million back to our beneficiaries and we want to make sure that we continue to do that.”

Johnson has represented Kansas House of Representatives District 108 since 2010. His professional experience includes working for Ameriprise, a financial services firm, and agricultural nonprofits the K-State Foundation and the Kansas 4-H Foundation. On Johnson’s campaign website, he emphasized government efficiency, saying, “I’m always looking for ways to increase efficiency and eliminate waste. As Treasurer I’ll look out for taxpayers and work hard to stop wasteful government spending.” Johnson also said “eliminating woke ESG investment strategies” was one of his top priorities because “ESG funds only invest in companies based on their environmental and corporate policies, making returns on investment a secondary concern.”

In the 2018 election, Jacob LaTurner (R) defeated Marci Francisco (D) 57.7%-42.3%. LaTurner left office after being elected to represent Kansas’ 2nd Congressional District in 2020. Before Rogers, the last Democratic state treasurer in Kansas was Dennis McKinney (D), who served from 2009-2011.

According to the official website, the treasurer “ensures safe and efficient operation of state government through effective banking, investment, and cash management. In short, the State Treasurer is the Chief Banker of the State.” The treasurer is also a board trustee of the Kansas Public Employees Retirement System, a member of the Pooled Money Investment Board, and a member of the Committee on Surety Bonds and Insurance.



Three candidates running for Missouri state auditor in November

Alan Green (D), Scott Fitzpatrick (R), and John Hartwig (L) are running for Missouri state auditor on Nov. 8, 2022. Green and Fitzpatrick have led in fundraising and polling. Incumbent Nicole Galloway (D) announced in June 2021 that she would not seek re-election.

Green was a member of the Missouri House of Representatives, representing District 67 from 2014 to 2021. He served as director of the Missouri Office of Equal Opportunity and advisor to two St. Louis County officials. Green also worked as a police officer, CFO, and minister. On his campaign website, Green emphasized whistleblower protection and transparency, saying, “I will advocate for stronger legislation to protect and stand up for whistleblowers” and “[w]ork to make sure that all allocated public dollars are used for the purposes and areas intended instead of being diverted for pet projects.”

Alan Green (D), Scott Fitzpatrick (R), and John Hartwig (L) are running for Missouri state auditor on Nov. 8, 2022. Green and Fitzpatrick have led in fundraising and polling. Incumbent Nicole Galloway (D) announced in June 2021 that she would not seek re-election.

Green was a member of the Missouri House of Representatives, representing District 67 from 2014 to 2021. He served as director of the Missouri Office of Equal Opportunity and advisor to two St. Louis County officials. Green also worked as a police officer, CFO, and minister. On his campaign website, Green emphasized whistleblower protection and transparency, saying, “I will advocate for stronger legislation to protect and stand up for whistleblowers” and “[w]ork to make sure that all allocated public dollars are used for the purposes and areas intended instead of being diverted for pet projects.”

Fitzpatrick was elected Missouri treasurer in 2019 and was a member of the Missouri House of Representatives, representing District 158 from 2013 to 2019. His professional experience included founding and operating MariCorp United States. Fitzpatrick focused on issues of government waste and corruption, saying, “Where waste, fraud, and abuse occur, I will find it and root it out,” and “you can trust me to give you the facts, fight for reforms wherever they are needed, and not cave to pressure from lobbyists or special interest groups when those facts show they are benefiting from sweetheart deals at your expense.”

At the time of the election, the auditor was the only statewide office held by a Democrat.

The office of state auditor acts as Missouri’s independent oversight agency, working to ensure the proper use of public funds and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of Missouri government. This is achieved through auditing of state agencies, boards and commissions, the circuit court system, the counties in Missouri that do not have a county auditor and other political subdivisions upon request.

Fitzpatrick was elected Missouri treasurer in 2019 and was a member of the Missouri House of Representatives, representing District 158 from 2013 to 2019. His professional experience included founding and operating MariCorp United States. Fitzpatrick focused on issues of government waste and corruption, saying, “Where waste, fraud, and abuse occur, I will find it and root it out,” and “you can trust me to give you the facts, fight for reforms wherever they are needed, and not cave to pressure from lobbyists or special interest groups when those facts show they are benefiting from sweetheart deals at your expense.”

At the time of the election, the auditor was the only statewide office held by a Democrat. Galloway was appointed state auditor by Gov. Jay Nixon (D) on April 14, 2015, and took office April 27. She was re-elected in 2018, when she defeated Republican incumbent 50.4%-44.6%.

The Office of state auditor acts as Missouri’s independent oversight agency, working to ensure the proper use of public funds and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of Missouri government. This is achieved through auditing of state agencies, boards and commissions, the circuit court system, the counties in Missouri that do not have a county auditor and other political subdivisions upon request.



All candidates for Iowa Secretary of State complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Iowa Secretary of State —incumbent Paul Pate (R) and Joel Miller (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

This is one of 27 secretary of state seats on the ballot in 2022. Iowa’s secretary of state serves as the state commissioner of elections, maintains corporations’ records, registers trademarks, commissions notaries public, and preserves original documents. Iowa is one of 26 states with a Republican secretary of state, and one of 9 states with a divided government triplex.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?        

Pate:           

“Continuing to protect the sanctity and security of Iowa’s elections are my top priorities. while increasing voter registration and participation. Iowa was recently named one of the top three states in the nation for election administration. I’d like us to be #1. We’ve made it easy to vote but hard to cheat. Under my watch, that will continue.

Under my watch, Iowa has set record highs for voter registration and participation multiple times. Iowa is a national leader in both. We implemented Iowa’s online voter registration system in 2016, making it faster and easier to register than ever. We also created the Safe at Home address confidentiality program, so survivors of domestic violence, sexual abuse, trafficking, stalking and assault can vote without fear of their address becoming public.”

Miller:

“Make Voting Easy Again! But to do so, Iowans must #FirePaulPate. Why? 

  • 1> Pate pocket vetoed two proposed amendments to the Iowa Constitution by failing to publish them in official newspapers. Pate blamed the mistake on staff and fired a top appointee. Legislature took away Pate’s duty to publish amendments.
  •  2> Pate negligently inactivated 17-year-olds not eligible to vote in the November 2020 election. Pate blamed the Legislature for making the law. Legislature changed law to prohibit Pate from inactivating 17 year-olds in the future. 
  • 3> Pate silent on voter suppression contained in 2021 election law changes. No leadership. Did not register For/Against/Neutral on law during debate or after passage.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Number of major party candidates on the primary ballot for state executive offices in 2022

This year, 1,140 major party candidates were on the primary ballot for 304 state executive seats around the country. The offices up for election include 36 gubernatorial seats, 30 lieutenant gubernatorial seats, 30 state attorney general seats, and 26 secretary of state seats. 

Of the major party candidates on the ballot, 463, or 40.61%, were Democrats, and 677, or 59.39%, were Republicans.

The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 46.25% of major party candidates did, and in 2018, when 49.02% did.

Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 53.75% did, and in 2018, when 50.98% did.

There were 1.52 Democratic candidates on the ballot per state executive seat this year. That’s more than the 1.35 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and fewer than the 1.7 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.

There were 2.23 Republican candidates on the ballot per state executive seat in 2022. That’s more than the 1.56 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.76 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.



Four states currently have a governor of one party and a veto-proof state legislative majority of the opposing party

Four states have a governor of one party and veto-proof legislative majorities of the opposing party: Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Massachusetts. Voters will determine whether three states—North Carolina, Vermont, and Wisconsin—could also have a veto-proof majority and an opposing party governor as a result of the 2022 elections.

When one party controls enough seats to overturn a veto without any support from the other party, a legislature has what’s called a veto-proof majority. A veto-proof majority strengthens the legislature’s hand when passing bills of which the governor disapproves. It can also lead to conflict when opposing parties control the legislature and governor’s mansion.

Here is a summary of the current partisan balance in each state that currently has a governor of one party and a veto-proof state legislative majority of the opposing party.

Kansas

The governor is Laura Kelly (D), who is running for re-election. In Kansas, two-thirds of the Legislature is required to override a gubernatorial veto. The Republican Party holds more than two-thirds of the seats in both chambers of the legislature, with an 86-38 majority in the state House of Representatives and a 29-11 majority in the state Senate.

Kentucky

The governor of Kentucky is Andy Beshear (D), who is not up for re-election until 2023. The Republican Party holds a majority in both chambers of the Legislature, with a 75-25 majority in the state House of Representatives and a 30-8 majority in the state Senate. In Kentucky, a simple majority of the legislature is required to override a gubernatorial veto.

Maryland

The governor of Maryland is Larry Hogan (R), who is term-limited. In Maryland, three-fifths of the General Assembly is required to override a gubernatorial veto. The Democratic Party holds more than three-fifths of the seats in both chambers, with a 99-42 majority in the House of Delegates and a 32-15 majority in the state Senate.

Massachusetts

The governor of Massachusetts is Charlie Baker (R), who is not running for re-election. In Massachusetts, two-thirds of the General Court is required to override a gubernatorial veto. The Democratic Party holds more than two-thirds of the seats in both chambers, with a 125-27 majority in the state House of Representatives and a 37-3 majority in the state Senate.

Three states could gain a veto-proof legislative majority and have a governor of the opposite party after the 2022 elections. We consider a state to be in this category if the number of seats the majority party would need to win in order to gain a supermajority is less than or equal to 10% of the total seats in the legislature.

North Carolina

The governor of North Carolina is Roy Cooper (D), who is not up for election until 2024. In North Carolina, three-fifths of the General Assembly is required to override a gubernatorial veto. Republicans have majorities in both chambers but not enough for a veto-proof majority. Republicans have a 68-51 majority in the state House of Representatives (a three-fifths majority would require 72 seats) and a 28-22 majority in the state Senate (a three-fifths majority would require 30 seats).

Vermont

The governor of Vermont is Phil Scott (R), who is running for re-election. In Vermont, two-thirds of the General Assembly is required to override a gubernatorial veto. Democrats have more than two-thirds of the seats in the state Senate with its 21-7 majority but fall short of this threshold with its 91-46 majority in the state House of Representatives (a two-thirds majority would require 100 seats).

Wisconsin

The governor of Wisconsin is Tony Evers (D), who is running for re-election. In Wisconsin, two-thirds of the Legislature is required to override a gubernatorial veto. Although Republicans have majorities in both chambers, it falls short of the two-thirds threshold. They currently have a 57-38 majority in the state Assembly (a two-thirds majority would require 66 seats) and a 21-12 majority in the state Senate (a two-thirds majority would require 22 seats).

All 50 state legislatures have the constitutional authority to override gubernatorial vetoes. A state’s constitution also specifies how many legislators are needed to override a veto. Depending on the state, the vote threshold required for a veto override applies to either all members elected to a chamber or to all members present in the chamber.

  • 36 states require a two-thirds vote from both chambers of the legislature.
  • Seven states require a three-fifths vote from both chambers of the legislature.
  • Six states require a majority vote from both chambers of the legislature.
  • Alaska requires a two-thirds vote in a joint meeting of its legislative chambers.

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Lydia York defeats Delaware Auditor Kathy McGuiness in Democratic primary

Lydia York defeated incumbent Kathy McGuiness in the Democratic primary for state auditor on September 13, 2022. McGuiness was elected to the office in 2018.

McGuiness was convicted on three misdemeanor charges in July 2022: conflict of interest, structuring, and official misconduct. The charges stemmed from McGuiness hiring her daughter to work in the auditor’s office as other employees’ hours were cut during the COVID-19 pandemic. Following the conviction, leaders in both chambers of the state legislature called on McGuiness to resign. This was the first instance of a sitting statewide elected official in Delaware being convicted of a crime. McGuiness faces maximum sentences of up to one year in prison for each misdemeanor count.

McGuiness said that the charges against her were politically motivated and that it was not illegal to hire a family member. Her attorney said they would appeal the case to the Delaware Supreme Court. “I have a great team so I look forward to working again with them to rectify the situation,” McGuiness said.

The Democratic Party of Delaware endorsed York in July. Chairwoman Betsy Maron said, “We saw Ms.York’s candidacy as an opportunity to restore the Auditor’s office to its intended function and do away with the political theater that has kept the incumbent at center stage for all the wrong reasons. Her legal, business, and finance backgrounds make Lydia York an immensely qualified Auditor who we are confident will do right by all Delawareans.”

York’s professional experience includes working as an accountant with PriceWaterhouseCoopers (then Coopers & Lybrand) and as a tax attorney. York said she filed to run because of the charges against McGuiness. “[R]egardless of your views on the trial and the outcome and all of that all a lot of witnesses testified to a work environment that was described across the board as toxic and it would be one of my primary missions frankly is to make that stop so people can do their work,” she said.



All candidates for Nevada State Board of Regents District 8 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Board of Regents District 8— Michelee Crawford and John Patrick Rice — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The Nevada State Board of Regents is an elected executive agency of the Nevada state government, responsible for managing the state’s system of higher education.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Crawford:           

  • “Increasing opportunities for access to college while expanding high school to college dual enrollment programs.”
  • “Increasing programming resources for rural NSHE institutions.”
  • “Restoring board credibility with collective work focused on outcomes measured by student enrollment, program diversification, and stakeholder climate surveys.”

Rice:               

  • “Further invest in in-person and online instruction access for underserved communities in urban and rural Nevada.”
  • “Using NSHE’s current distance learning infrastructure, capitalize on the world-wide distance learning market to enhance brick and mortar operations in Nevada.”
  • “Using the developing NSHE strategic plan and the ongoing conversations surrounding ‘Question One’, engage in a comprehensive transformation of NSHE’s governing operations.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Delaware auditor faces primary challenger following misdemeanor convictions

Incumbent Kathy McGuiness and Lydia York are running in the Democratic primary for Delaware state auditor on September 13, 2022. 

McGuiness was elected to the office in 2018. Before becoming state auditor, she served five terms on the Rehoboth Beach City Commission and worked as a pharmacist. McGuiness is running on her record as auditor. Her campaign website said, “Under Kathy’s leadership, the Auditor’s Office has become a nationwide leader in innovation and efficiency. McGuiness has created a new mobile app for Delaware taxpayers to report fraud, waste and abuse, and also created an interactive CARES Act Fund Tracker portal.”

McGuiness was convicted on three misdemeanor charges in July 2022: conflict of interest, structuring, and official misconduct. The charges stemmed from McGuiness hiring her daughter to work in the auditor’s office as other employees’ hours were cut during the COVID-19 pandemic. Following the conviction, leaders in both chambers of the state legislature called on McGuiness to resign. This was the first instance of a sitting statewide elected official in Delaware being convicted of a crime. McGuiness faces maximum sentences of up to one year in prison for each misdemeanor count.

McGuiness said that the charges against her were politically motivated and that it was not illegal to hire a family member. Her attorney said they would appeal the case to the Delaware Supreme Court. “I have a great team so I look forward to working again with them to rectify the situation,” McGuiness said.

York’s professional experience includes working as an accountant with PriceWaterhouseCoopers (then Coopers & Lybrand) and as a tax attorney. York said she filed to run because of the charges against McGuiness. “[R]egardless of your views on the trial and the outcome and all of that all a lot of witnesses testified to a work environment that was described across the board as toxic and it would be one of my primary missions frankly is to make that stop so people can do their work,” she said.

The Democratic Party of Delaware endorsed York in July. Chairwoman Betsy Maron said, “We saw Ms.York’s candidacy as an opportunity to restore the Auditor’s office to its intended function and do away with the political theater that has kept the incumbent at center stage for all the wrong reasons. Her legal, business, and finance backgrounds make Lydia York an immensely qualified Auditor who we are confident will do right by all Delawareans.”

The stated function of the auditor’s office is to “[serve] Delawareans by providing independent objective oversight of the state government’s use of taxpayer dollars with the goal of deterring fraud, waste and abuse through unbiased assessments, including the use of various audits, special reports, and investigations of financial operations designed to ensure statutory compliance while enhancing governmental economy, efficiency and effectiveness.”

Editor’s note: A previous version of this story erroneously listed the Democratic primary as occurring on September 6.



Zeigler, Allen advance to Alabama secretary of state primary runoff

Jim Zeigler and Wes Allen advanced from the Republican primary for Alabama secretary of state to a June 21, 2022, primary runoff. A candidate needed at least 50% of the primary vote to win outright. Zeigler had 43% and Allen, 40% as of Wednesday afternoon. Christian Horn and Ed Packard also ran in the May 24 primary. Incumbent John Merrill (R) was term-limited.

Each candidate said his experience prepared him for the position. Allen was a Pike County Probate Court judge and said he administered more than a dozen elections without error. Zeigler, the state auditor, said he had been a “watchman against government waste, mismanagement and corruption” and would be a watchman for election integrity.

The candidates each highlighted areas of election policy they would focus on. Allen said he opposed mass mail, no-excuse absentee, early, and curbside voting and supported a photo ID requirement. Zeigler highlighted his support for a photo ID requirement and opposition to same-day voter registration, allowing non-citizens to vote, efforts to extend the voting period, ballot drop boxes, and allowing people to return ballots on behalf of other voters.

Republicans have held the Secretary of State office in Alabama since 2007. The secretary of state is Alabama’s chief election official and certifies vote totals, ballots, and fundraising records. The secretary of state is also responsible for business registration and keeping the state government’s official documents and public records.