TagU.S. House

Nadler defeats Maloney in final incumbent-vs.-incumbent primary

U.S. Rep. Jerry Nadler defeated U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney, Suraj Patel, and Ashmi Sheth in the Democratic primary for New York’s 12th Congressional District on Aug. 23, 2022. Nadler received 55% of the vote to Maloney’s 24%, followed by Patel with 19%.

This race was the last of six primaries featuring two U.S. House incumbents due to congressional redistricting. Maloney currently represents the old 12th District, and Nadler represents the old 10th District. According to data from Daily Kos, Maloney represents 61% of the redrawn 12th District’s population, and Nadler represents 39%.

Both Nadler and Maloney were first elected in 1992. Nadler chairs the Judiciary Committee, and Maloney chairs the Oversight and Reform Committee. Both are members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

Patel, an attorney, challenged Maloney in 2018 and 2020. In 2020, Maloney defeated Patel 43% to 39% in a four-candidate race.

The New York Times’ Nicholas Fandos wrote of the primary, “With overwhelmingly similar views, the candidates … toiled through the summer to differentiate themselves.” Fandos said that Nadler “tried to claim the progressive mantle and highlighted his status as the city’s last remaining Jewish congressman,” Maloney’s campaign “centered on women — both their electoral potential to sway the outcome and the importance of protecting one of their own,” and Patel “[targeted] younger voters, stressing the need for generational change against two septuagenarians[.]”

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and The New York Times editorial board endorsed Nadler. Maloney received endorsements from the Congressional Progressive Caucus PAC and EMILY’s List. 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang and Indian American Impact endorsed Patel.

Major independent observers rate the general election as solid or safe Democratic.



New York sees seven open U.S. House seats, a decade-high

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in New York this year was June 10, 2022. One hundred and six candidates are running for New York’s 26 U.S. House districts, including 67 Democrats and 39 Republicans. That’s 4.08 candidates per district, more than the four candidates per district in 2020 and the 3.15 in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census, which resulted in New York losing one U.S. House district. 
  • The 106 candidates running this year are two fewer than the 108 who ran in 2020 and 21 more than the 85 who ran in 2018. Seventy-seven candidates ran in 2016, 55 in 2014, and 81 in 2012.

  • Four incumbents are running in districts other than the ones they currently represent. Rep. Claudia Tenney (R), who represents the 22nd district, is running in the 24th this year. Rep. Sean Maloney (D), who represents the 18th district, is running in the 17th, and Rep. Mondaire Jones (D), the incumbent in the 17th, is running in the 10th.
  • Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D), who represents the 10th district, is running in the 12th this year. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D), the incumbent in the 12th district, is running for re-election, making the 12th the only New York district this year where two incumbents are running against each other. 
  • Five incumbents—two Democrats and three Republicans—are not running for re-election this year. 
  • Rep. Lee Zeldin (R), who represents the 1st district, and Rep. Tom Suozzi (D), who represents the 3rd district, filed to run for governor. 
  • Rep. John Katko (R), who represents the 24th district, and Rep. Kathleen Rice (D), who represents the 4th district, are retiring. 
  • Rep. Christopher Jacobs (R), who represents the 27th district, is also retiring. The 27th district will be eliminated after this cycle due to redistricting. 
  • There are seven open seats this year, a decade-high. That number is up from four in 2020, and from one in 2018. There were four open seats in 2016 and two each in 2014 and 2012.

  • The open seats include Zeldin’s 1st district, Suozzi’s 3rd, Rice’s 4th, Maloney’s 18th, and Tenney’s 22nd. Additionally, the 19th and the 23rd districts are currently vacant. 
  • Rep. Antonio Delgado (D), who represented the 19th, was appointed lieutenant governor of New York, and Rep. Tom Reed (R), who represented the 23rd, resigned after a sexual misconduct allegation. Special elections will be held on August 23 to fill both seats.
  • Fourteen candidates are running to replace Nadler in the 10th district, the most candidates running for a seat this year. One of the candidates, former New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (D), unofficially withdrew from the race, but his name will appear on the ballot.
  • There are 16 contested Democratic primaries this year, the same number as in 2020, and three more than in 2018, when there were 13. There were 10 contested Democratic primaries in 2016, five in 2014, and 10 in 2012. 
  • There are eight contested Republican primaries. That’s one more than in 2020, when there were seven contested Republican primaries, and seven more than in 2018, when there was one. There were three contested Republican primaries in 2016, five in 2014, and five in 2012. 

  • Seven incumbents are not facing any primary challengers this year. 
  • One seat—the 5th— is guaranteed to Democrats because no Republicans filed. No seats are guaranteed to Republicans because no Democrats filed. 

New York and Florida are holding their congressional primaries on August 23, 2022. In New York, the winner of a primary election is the candidate who receives the greatest number of votes, even if he or she does not win more than 50 percent of votes cast.

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Harriet Hageman defeats Liz Cheney in the Republican primary for Wyoming’s At-large Congressional District

Harriet Hageman defeated Liz Cheney, Anthony Bouchard, Robyn Belinskey, and Denton Knapp in the Republican primary for Wyoming’s At-large Congressional District on August 16, 2022. According to the Federal Election Commission (FEC), Cheney, who was first elected to represent this district in 2016, Bouchard, and Hageman led the primary field in fundraising heading into Election Day.

Cheney voted to impeach President Donald Trump (R) on Jan. 13, 2021, for incitement of insurrection in the breach of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. She also voted to support the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol. Cheney said, “I will do everything I can to make sure the former president never again gets anywhere near the Oval Office…We have seen the danger that he continues to provoke with his language…We have seen his lack of commitment and dedication to the Constitution.”

In response, the Republican National Committee and the Republican Party of Wyoming voted to censure Cheney. Cheney was also removed from her leadership position as GOP Conference Chairwoman in the U.S. House.

Cheney received 73.5% and 67.2% of the vote in the 2020 and 2018 Republican primaries, respectively. A Wyoming Public Media poll conducted by the University of Wyoming from July and August of 2022 showed Hageman leading with 57% of likely voters, compared to 28% for Cheney and 2% for Bouchard. Ten percent of respondents remained undecided.

Cheney said she is “honored to represent the people of Wyoming and proud of my strong conservative record. I look forward to an extended public debate about the importance of the rule of law…It is tragic that some in this race have sacrificed those principles, and their duty to the people of Wyoming, out of fear and in favor of loyalty to a former president…” Cheney was endorsed by former President George W. Bush (R), U.S. Sen. Mitt Romney (R), and U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R). Heading into the week of the election, the FEC reported that Cheney raised more than $15 million.

Hageman founded the Wyoming Conservation Alliance and has worked as an attorney and legal consultant. Former President Trump endorsed Hageman on Sep. 13, 2021. Hageman said she is running because “Wyoming is entitled to a representative in Congress who remembers who sent her there and remembers what their wishes are…Liz Cheney is doing neither, and I will do both.” Hageman worked for Cheney’s unsuccessful U.S. Senate campaign in 2014 and said that she is challenging Cheney because of Cheney’s focus on the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol. In addition to former President Trump, Hageman also received endorsements from over 100 Republican members of the U.S. House. Heading into the week of the election, Hageman raised nearly $4.5 million for this primary.

Bouchard served as a Wyoming state senator from 2016 to 2022, representing the state’s 6th district. He founded the Wyoming Gun Owners, an organization that says it is dedicated to “defending and advancing the 2nd Amendment rights of all law-abiding citizens in the state of Wyoming.”

Bouchard called Cheney out of touch with Wyoming voters for voting to impeach President Trump. Bouchard said, “Wyoming was President Trump’s best state both times he ran…That’s because Wyoming voters are strong conservatives who want our leaders to stand up for America, defend our freedoms, fight for our way of life and always put working people first as President Trump did.” Bouchard was endorsed by conservative activist Brent Bozell. Heading into the week of the election, Bouchard raised more than $600,000 for this primary.

Other candidates on the ballot included Robyn Belinskey and Denton Knapp. Before the primary, the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections all rated Wyoming’s At-Large Congressional District as a solid/safe Republican seat.



Preliminary results from Alaska’s top-four U.S. House primary

A top-four primary took place on Aug. 16 in Alaska’s At-Large Congressional District to determine which four candidates will run in the general election on Nov. 8. As of 1:00 a.m. ET on Aug. 17, with 61% of results reported, Mary Peltola (D) led with 34.5% of the vote, followed by Sarah Palin (R) with 32.2%, Nicholas Begich (R) with 27.1%, and Tara Sweeney (R) with 3.2%.

All candidates appeared on the same ballot with their affiliations listed next to their names. The general election will use ranked-choice voting.

Former Rep. Don Young (R) died in March 2022. The regularly scheduled election is one of two elections, alongside a special election, for Alaska’s at-large House district in 2022.

Twenty-two candidates were on the regular primary ballot: nine undeclared or nonpartisan candidates, nine Republicans, one Democrat, and three minor party candidates.

Fifteen of the candidates also ran in the special primary election to fill the remainder of Young’s term. Begich (R), Palin (R), and Peltola (D) advanced from the June 11 special primary. Al Gross (I) also advanced but withdrew from the race.

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Preliminary results from Alaska’s special U.S. House election

A special election to fill Alaska’s At-Large Congressional District in the U.S. House was held on Aug. 16. Sarah Palin (R), Nicholas Begich III (R), and Mary Peltola (D) ran. Al Gross (I) also advanced from the June 11 top-four primary, but he withdrew from the race on June 20.

This election will use ranked-choice voting. Alaska Beacon reported that election officials will not begin ranked-choice tabulation until at least Aug. 31, the deadline for ballots to arrive and be counted in the special election. As of 1:00 a.m. ET on August 17, Mary Peltola (D) had 37.2% of first-choice votes, followed by Sarah Palin (R) with 32.8% and Nicholas Begich (R) with 28.7%.

Former Rep. Don Young (R) died in March.

Begich founded a technology development company and co-founded a company that invests in startups. He co-chaired the Alaska Republican Party Finance Committee and Young’s 2020 re-election campaign. Begich entered the regular U.S. House primary election before Young’s death. Begich campaigned on his business background, saying he could “make the business case for Alaska effectively down in D.C.”

Palin served as governor of Alaska from 2006 to 2009 and was John McCain’s (R) vice presidential running mate in 2008. Palin campaigned on her record as governor, which she said included taking “meaningful steps toward energy independence, passing bipartisan ethics reform, and facilitating the biggest private sector infrastructure project in U.S. history.” Palin said after Young’s death, “As I’ve watched the far left destroy the country, I knew I had to step up and join the fight.”

Peltola served in the Alaska House of Representatives from 1999 to 2009 and was interim executive director of the Kuskokwim River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission as of the special election. Peltola said she was a “[p]roven legislative leader and coalition builder.” She emphasized her background in fishing and made marine resource management a key campaign issue. Peltola also highlighted that she is an Alaska Native woman and said, “Our elected officials have not been representative of our state.”

In 2020, voters in Alaska passed Ballot Measure 2 in a 50.55%-49.45% vote. The measure established open top-four primaries for state executive, state legislative, and congressional offices and ranked-choice voting for general elections.

In addition to the special election, Alaska is holding a separate regularly scheduled election for the U.S. House.

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Florida sees 152 U.S. House candidates in 2022, a decade-high

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in Florida this year was June 17, 2022. One hundred and fifty-two candidates are running for Florida’s 28 U.S. House districts, including 58 Democrats and 94 Republicans. That’s 5.43 candidates per district, more than the 4.22 candidates per district in 2020 and the 3.86 in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census, which resulted in Florida gaining one U.S. House district. 
  • The 152 candidates running this year are a decade-high. One hundred and fourteen candidates ran in 2020, 104 in 2018, 100 in 2016, 75 in 2014, and 89 in 2012.
  • A total of eight incumbents are running in districts different from the ones they currently represent. 
  • Two incumbents from different parties are running against each other in the 2nd district. Rep. Al Lawson (D), who represents the 5th district, is running against 2nd district incumbent Rep. Neal Dunn (R) in the general election.
  • Four incumbents are not running for re-election. Rep. Charlie Crist (D), who represents the 13th district, is running for governor, and Rep. Val Demings (D), who represents the 10th district, is running for the U.S. Senate. Rep. Stephanie Murphy (D), who represents the 7th district, and Rep. Ted Deutch (D), who represents the 22nd district, are retiring.  
  • Six seats are open, including Crist’s, Demings’, and Murphy’s. The three remaining open seats are the 4th, the 15th, and the 23rd. 
  • Rep. John Rutherford (R), who represents the 4th district, is running in the 5th this year, and Rep. Scott Franklin (R), who represents the 15th district, is running in the 18th. Rep. Debbie Wasserman-Schultz (D), who represents the 23rd district, is running in the 25th.
  • The six open seats this year are four more than in 2020, when two seats were open, and two more than in 2018, when four seats were open. Seven seats were open in 2016, and no seats were open in 2014.

  • Sixteen candidates—10 Democrats and six Republicans—are running to replace Demings in the 10th district, the most candidates running for a seat this year.
  • There are 38 contested primaries this year, a decade-high. That’s nine more than in 2020, when there were 29 contested primaries, and seven more than in 2018, when there were 31 contested primaries. 
  • Fourteen of the contested primaries are Democratic primaries. That’s four more than in 2020, when there were ten contested Democratic primaries, and five fewer than in 2018, when there were 19. 
  • Twenty-four of the contested primaries are Republican primaries. That number, a decade-high, is five more than in 2020, when there were 19 contested Republican primaries, and 12 more than in 2018, when there were 12.

  • There are 17 incumbents in contested primaries this year, also a decade-high. That number is seven more than in 2020, when ten incumbents faced contested primaries, and six more than in 2018, when 11 incumbents did. 
  • Six incumbents face no primary challengers this year. 
  • Three seats—the 5th, the 6th, and the 18th districts—are guaranteed to Republicans because no Democrats filed. No seats are guaranteed to Democrats because no Republicans filed.

Florida is holding its primaries on August 23. In Florida, the winner of a primary election is the candidate who receives the greatest number of votes, even if he or she does not win an outright majority of votes cast.

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Eric Sorensen and Esther Joy King are running for Illinois’ 17th Congressional District on November 8, 2022

Eric Sorensen (D) and Esther Joy King (R) are running in the general election for Illinois’ 17th Congressional District on November 8, 2022. Incumbent Rep. Cheri Bustos (D) is not running for re-election.

Sorensen worked as a TV meteorologist in Rockford and the Quad Cities area for nearly 20 years, and this is his first run for public office. King, a lawyer and JAG officer in the U.S. Army, was the Republican nominee for the 17th district in 2020. King lost to Bustos 54% to 48%.

Bloomberg Government’s Greg Giroux said, “This race will test the sturdiness of a Democratic gerrymander in an election that’s more likely than not to favor Republicans. Legislators boosted the district’s Democratic leanings after Rep. Cheri Bustos (D) announced her retirement, though Republicans say the reconfigured district—one of 23 nationwide that Biden would have won in 2020 by between 5 and 10 percentage points—is competitive enough for them to flip.”

Three election forecasters rate the race a Toss-up. Monmouth College Professor Robin Johnson said, “It will be very competitive, and I anticipate the parties are going to try to kick money in and resources to try to win this seat.”

A Democrat has represented the 17th district since 1983, except for the period between 2011 and 2013, when former Rep. Bobby Schilling (R) represented the district. Bustos defeated Schilling 53.3% to 46.7% in the 2012 general election and has represented the district since.

Following the 2020 census, the redrawn district has a more Democratic partisan lean than the old district, according to The Cook Political Report and FiveThirtyEight. The Cook PVI (Partisan Voting Index) score for the old district was R+3, while the score for the new district is D+4. According to FiveThirtyEight, the old district had a partisan lean of R+5, while the new district has a partisan lean of D+4.

The redrawn district includes parts of Rockford, Peoria, Bloomington-Normal, Macomb, and the Quad Cities. President Joe Biden (D) received 53% of the redrawn district’s vote in 2020, while former President Donald Trump (R) received 45%.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of August 3, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Republicans need to gain a net of eight seats to win a majority in the chamber.



Jaime Herrera Beutler becomes 12th U.S. House member to lose a primary election this year

On August 15, 2022, media outlets called the top-two primary for Washington’s 3rd Congressional District. Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez (D) and Joe Kent (R) advanced with 31.0% and 22.8% of the vote, respectively. Incumbent Jaime Herrera Beutler (R) finished third with 22.2%.

Herrera Beutler is the 12th member of the U.S. House to lose an election this cycle. With more primaries and all general elections remaining, 2022 is now even with the 2016 election cycle for the number of incumbent losses. In the past five election cycles, 2018 saw the most incumbent losses (34), followed by 2012 (27).

Herrera Beutler was one of 10 Republican representatives to vote in favor of impeaching then-President Donald Trump (R) on January 13, 2021. In a statement the day before the vote, Herrera Beutler said she would vote to impeach Trump because he “incited a riot intended to halt the peaceful transfer of power from one administration to the next. That riot led to five deaths.” Herrera Beutler was publicly rebuked by the Washington Republican Party and censured by the Clark County Republican Party.

Kent identified himself as an America First candidate, a term often associated with the platform of Trump and candidates who say they support Trump’s agenda. Kent said that he got into elected politics because of the January 2021 impeachment vote. Trump endorsed Kent on July 26, 2022. During a virtual campaign event, Trump said, “[Herrera Beutler] voted for the radical Democrats second impeachment hoax where the Republicans stood up tall for me but she didn’t.”

Washington uses a top-two primary system, in which all candidates appear on the same ballot, for congressional and state-level elections. The top two vote-getters move on to the general election, regardless of their party affiliation. 



Wyoming sees most U.S. House candidates since 2016

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in Wyoming this year was May 27, 2022. Eight candidates are running for Wyoming’s At-Large U.S. House district, including three Democrats and five Republicans. That’s three more than the five candidates who ran in 2020 and in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • Because it has only one U.S. House seat, Wyoming did not need to redistrict after the 2020 census.
  • The eight candidates running this year are the most candidates running for the U.S. House since 2016, when ten candidates ran.
  • Incumbent Rep. Liz Cheney (R) is running for re-election. Cheney was first elected in 2016, the last year Wyoming’s At-Large seat was open.
  • Both primaries are contested. The last year a Wyoming U.S. House primary wasn’t contested was 2014. 

Wyoming and Alaska are holding their primaries on August 16, 2022. Winners in Wyoming primary elections are determined via plurality vote, meaning that the candidate with the highest number of votes wins even if he or she did not win an outright majority of votes cast.



Hawaii sees one open U.S. House seat for the sixth election cycle in a row

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in Hawaii this year was June 7, 2022. Thirteen candidates are running for Hawaii’s two U.S. House districts, including eight Democrats and five Republicans. That’s 6.5 candidates per district, less than the 9.5 candidates per district in 2020 and the same number as in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Hawaii was apportioned two districts, the same number it was apportioned after the 2010 census.
  • The 13 candidates running this year are six fewer than the 19 candidates who ran in 2020 and the same number as in 2018. Twelve candidates ran in 2016 and 2014, and 13 ran in 2012.
  • Rep. Kaiali’i Kahele (D) is retiring to run for governor of Hawaii, making the 2nd district an open seat this year. This is the sixth consecutive election cycle where one of Hawaii’s two U.S. House seats is open. 
  • Eight candidates — two Republicans and six Democrats — are running to replace Kahele, the most candidates running for a seat this year.
  • There are four contested primaries this year, the most since 2012. There were three contested primaries in every election cycle between 2014 and 2020. 
  • Democratic and Republican candidates filed to run in both districts, so no seats are guaranteed to either party this year. 

Hawaii is holding congressional primaries on August 13, 2022, the 41st state to do so. In Hawaii, the winner of a primary election is the candidate who receives the greatest number of votes, even if he or she does not win an outright majority of votes cast.

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