Tagunemployment

U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 213,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 5,000 for the week ending September 10 to a seasonally adjusted 213,000. The previous week’s figure was revised down from 222,000 to 218,000. The four-week moving average as of September 10 fell to 224,000 from a revised 232,000 as of the week ending September 3.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 2,000 from the previous week’s revised number to a seasonally adjusted 1.403 million for the week ending September 3. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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  1. Unemployment insurance
  2. Unemployment insurance fraud


U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 222,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 6,000 for the week ending September 3 to a seasonally adjusted 222,000. The previous week’s figure was revised down from 232,000 to 228,000. The four-week moving average as of September 3 fell to 233,000 from a revised 240,500 as of the week ending August 27.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 36,000 from the previous week’s revised number to a seasonally adjusted 1.473 million for the week ending August 27. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims rise to 262,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits rose 14,000 for the week ending August 6 to a seasonally adjusted 262,000. The previous week’s figure was revised down from 260,000 to 248,000. The four-week moving average as of August 6 rose to 252,000 from a revised 247,500 as of the week ending July 30.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 8,000 from the previous week’s revised number to a seasonally adjusted 1.428 million for the week ending July 30. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims rise to 260,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits rose 6,000 for the week ending July 30 to a seasonally adjusted 260,000. The previous week’s figure was revised down from 256,000 to 254,000. The four-week moving average as of July 30 rose to 254,750 from a revised 248,750 as of the week ending July 23.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 48,000 to a seasonally adjusted 1.416 million for the week ending July 23. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 256,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 5,000 for the week ending July 23 to a seasonally adjusted 256,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 251,000 to 261,000. The four-week moving average as of July 23 rose to 249,250 from a revised 243,000 as of the week ending July 16.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, fell 25,000 to a seasonally adjusted 1.359 million for the week ending July 16. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

Additional reading:

Unemployment insurance

Unemployment insurance fraud



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims rise to 251,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits rose 7,000 for the week ending July 16 to a seasonally adjusted 251,000. The four-week moving average as of July 16 rose to 240,500 from 236,000 as of the week ending June 9.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 51,000 to a seasonally adjusted 1.384 million for the week ending July 9. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims rise to 235,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits rose 4,000 for the week ending July 2 to a seasonally adjusted 235,000. The four-week moving average as of July 2 rose to 232,500 from 231,750 as of the week ending June 25.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 51,000 to a seasonally adjusted 1.375 million for the week ending June 25. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:

Unemployment insurance

Unemployment insurance fraud



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 231,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 2,000 for the week ending June 25 to a seasonally adjusted 231,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 229,000 to 233,000. The four-week moving average as of June 25 rose to 231,750 from a revised 224,500 as of the week ending June 18.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, fell 3,000 to a seasonally adjusted 1.328 million for the week ending June 18. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 229,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 2,000 for the week ending June 18 to a seasonally adjusted 229,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 229,000 to 231,000. The four-week moving average as of June 18 rose to 223,500 from a revised 219,000 as of the week ending June 11.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 5,000 to a seasonally adjusted 1.315 million for the week ending June 11. Reporting for continuing claims lag one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

Additional reading:



Iowa governor signs law to reduce duration of unemployment insurance benefits

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) signed HF 2355 on June 16, reducing the maximum length of unemployment insurance payments from 26 weeks to 16 weeks starting July 3. The law also re-defines suitable work and will require claimants to accept jobs that pay less than their previous jobs after their first week of benefits. Workers who claim unemployment insurance longer will have to take jobs that pay a lower percentage of their previous wages or salaries.

Workers who file for benefits before the week of July 3 will still be eligible for up to 26 weeks of benefits, but they will have to comply with the new suitable work requirements.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For more information on Iowa’s unemployment insurance program, click here. For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

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