Tagunemployment

Minnesota governor signs bill to fund unemployment insurance account

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz (D) signed a bill May 2 that will direct about $2.7 billion to the state’s Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund and repay the state’s $1.4 billion unemployment insurance debt to the federal government. The law also includes about $500 million to send $750 direct payments to 667,000 individuals the state considers frontline coronavirus pandemic workers.

The move will reduce the unemployment insurance tax burden on employers, which increased March 15 to help refill the fund following the coronavirus pandemic.

The legislation is a compromise between the smaller $2.7 billion bill passed in the Republican-controlled state Senate in February, which only included funding for the unemployment trust fund, and the $3.7 billion Democratic House bill passed April 25 that included $1,500 checks for 667,000 state-defined frontline pandemic workers.

Unemployment insurance is a term that refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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Colorado legislators introduce bill to direct federal funds to repay unemployment insurance debt

Colorado legislators on May 2 introduced a bill that would direct $600 million of federal American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds to help pay back the state’s $1 billion unemployment insurance trust fund debt to the federal government. The bill would also forgive certain non-fraud overpayments, meaning some workers who received more unemployment insurance payments than they were owed during the coronavirus pandemic would not have to pay the money back. The bill also contains provisions allowing claimants to work part-time and make up to half their previous income without a benefit reduction and allowing unlawful U.S. immigrants to claim unemployment insurance benefits if their employer pays unemployment taxes.

The $600 million funding would reduce the unemployment insurance tax burden on employers, which increased in 2022 and will increase in 2023 unless the fund’s solvency improves. Lawmakers have about two weeks left in the legislative session to pass the bill in both the House and the Senate.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 180,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 5,000 (2.7%) for the week ending April 23 to a seasonally adjusted 180,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 184,000 to 185,000. The four-week moving average as of April 23 rose to 179,750 from a revised 177,500 as of the week ending April 16.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, fell 1,000 from the previous week’s revised estimate to 1.408 million, the lowest level since Feb. 7, 1970.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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Minnesota House passes bill to fund unemployment insurance fund and send checks to frontline workers

The Minnesota House of Representatives passed a $3.7 billion bill on April 25 that would raise the balance of the state’s Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund and repay unemployment insurance debts to the federal government. The move would reduce the unemployment insurance tax burden on employers, which increased March 15 to help refill the fund following the coronavirus pandemic.

The legislation differs from the smaller $2.7 billion bill passed in the Republican-controlled state Senate in February, which also would have expanded the trust fund, paid the state’s federal debt, and reduced taxes for employers. The $3.7 billion Democratic House bill includes a provision that would send $1,500 checks to about 667,000 individuals the state considered frontline workers during the pandemic. The House bill would also expand unemployment insurance eligibility to hourly school workers.

Members of both chambers will meet in a conference committee to attempt to negotiate a compromise between the $2.7 billion bill and the $3.7 billion bill.

Unemployment insurance is a term that refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For more information on Minnesota’s unemployment insurance program, click here. For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

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U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 184,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 2,000 (7.4%) for the week ending April 16 to a seasonally adjusted 184,000. The four-week moving average as of April 16 rose to 177,250 from a revised 172,750 as of the week ending April 9.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, fell 58,000 to 1.417 million, the lowest level since Feb. 21, 1970.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

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U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims drop to lowest level since 1968

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits dropped 5,000 for the week ending April 2 from the previous week’s revised figure to a seasonally adjusted 166,000. The number is the lowest recorded since the week ending Nov. 30, 1968. The weekly drop also brought the four-week moving average as of April 2 down to 170,000 from 178,000—the revised figure from the week ending March 26.

The Labor Department revised the seasonally adjusted total of jobless claims down to 171,000 from the previously reported 202,000 for the week ending March 26. The department also revised the four-week moving average for the week ending March 26 to 178,000 from the previous 208,500.

Weekly initial unemployment insurance claims were at a record high of 6.15 million in April 2020.

Unemployment insurance refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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Michigan pauses collection of pandemic unemployment insurance overpayments

The Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency announced April 8 a temporary pause on the collection of unemployment insurance overpayments issued during the coronavirus pandemic. The pause prevents the state from garnishing wages or intercepting state tax returns until at least May 7.

The agency said the pause would give officials time to determine which claimants are eligible to have the overpayment waived under the federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program. Collections for overpayments incurred before March 2020 will continue during the freeze.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) signed a bill on Feb. 28 allowing part-time workers who received federal PUA to keep their benefits. Federal PUA benefits were designed to assist workers who did not qualify for regular unemployment insurance benefits, such as gig workers, self-employed workers, and part-time workers. Until Whitmer signed the February 28 bill, Michigan’s unemployment insurance law conflicted with federal law under the CARES Act and did not allow part-time workers to claim PUA benefits. The state required claimants to be able and available to work full-time.

Due to the conflict, the Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency requested repayment of benefits from some part-time workers (and from workers who were not available to work for pandemic-related reasons, such as caretaking) who attested to their ability and availability to work full-time. The April 8 pause will give officials time to determine who is eligible to keep PUA benefits they were paid.

Unemployment insurance refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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Massachusetts announces plan to waive up to $1.6 billion in non-fraudulent unemployment insurance overpayments

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker’s (R) administration announced on April 14 a plan to waive $1.6 billion in non-fraudulent unemployment insurance overpayment collections. The plan would offer waivers for some workers who claimed benefits during the pandemic but were asked to repay them because the state deemed them ineligible after the payment of benefits.

In total, the administration would write off $475 million in overpaid benefits related to insufficient identity verification. The state argued many of those overpayments involved cases of identity theft where affected claimants never received benefits.

The US Department of Labor (USDOL) also granted a partial blanket waiver for all Federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) overpayments related to insufficient proof-of-work between the weeks ending Jan. 2 and March 20, 2021. The partial blanket waiver will cover about $349 million of overpayments.

The state is also planning to file emergency regulations to issue waivers for up to $782 million additional non-fraudulent state unemployment insurance and federal PUA overpayments not covered under the USDOL waiver. The state did not release details on who would qualify for forgiveness under the emergency regulations.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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Alabama adds requirement for unemployment insurance eligibility

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey (R) signed Senate Bill 224 on April 12, requiring unemployment insurance claimants to contact at least three prospective employers each week during their benefits period to remain eligible for payments. The bill defines a contact as an application or other genuine solicitation for an open job. The Alabama Department of Labor will also have to audit about 5% of the contacts to make sure they comply with regulations under the new law.

SB 224 takes effect Jan. 2023. Alabama law currently requires claimants to contact one prospective employer each week to maintain benefits eligibility.

Unemployment insurance refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



New weekly U.S. unemployment insurance claims rise 7.4% over previous week

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits rose 14,000 (7.4%) for the week ending March 26 to a seasonally adjusted 202,000. The four-week moving average as of March 26 dropped to 208,500 from 211,750 as of the week ending March 26.

Initial claims for the previous week ending March 19 came in at a seasonally adjusted 187,000, which was the lowest number recorded since September 1969.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading: