Tagunemployment

U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 186,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 6,000 for the week ending January 21 to a seasonally adjusted 186,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 190,000 to 192,000. The four-week moving average as of January 21 fell to 197,500 from a revised 206,750 as of the week ending January 14.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 20,000 from the previous week’s revised number to a seasonally adjusted 1.675 million for the week ending January 14. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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West Virginia Senate passes unemployment insurance indexing bill

The West Virginia State Senate on January 23 passed a bill 27-5 that would index the length of unemployment insurance benefits to the state’s unemployment rate. During times when the unemployment rate is below 5.5%, unemployed workers could collect a maximum of 12 weeks of benefits. For each 0.5% increase in the unemployment rate, the maximum benefit duration would increase by one week under the bill, with a maximum benefit length of 20 weeks during times of high unemployment.

West Virginia’s current maximum benefit length is 26 weeks. The state’s unemployment rate was 4.1% in November and December, according to the most recent U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, meaning the maximum weekly benefit would fall by 14 weeks (to a maximum of 12 weeks) if the bill passes and the unemployment rate remains stable.

The bill would also require WorkForce West Virginia—the agency in charge of administering the unemployment insurance program in the state—to verify the identities of applicants and take additional steps to review what the legislation describes as suspicious claims.

Claimants would also have to complete at least four qualifying work search activities per week (such as interviewing or applying for a job). Under current law, claimants are eligible for benefits if they are “doing that which a reasonably prudent person in his or her circumstances would do in seeking work,” with no specific requirements.

The bill now heads to the West Virginia House of Delegates for consideration.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 204,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 19,000 for the week ending December 31 to a seasonally adjusted 204,000. The previous week’s figure was revised down from 225,000 to 223,000. The four-week moving average as of December 31 fell to 213,750 from a revised 220,500 as of the week ending December 24.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, fell 24,000 from the previous week’s revised number to a seasonally adjusted 1.694 million for the week ending December 24. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For information about unemployment insurance programs across the country, click here.

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Kentucky unemployment insurance indexing bill takes effect

An unemployment insurance indexing law in Kentucky took effect January 1, 2023, establishing a 12-week maximum benefit period during periods of low unemployment and a 24-week maximum benefit period during times of high unemployment. The Kentucky House and Senate both voted on March 21, 2022, to override Gov. Andy Beshear’s (D) veto of House Bill 4 and pass the indexing law.

Indexing unemployment insurance program benefits is an approach that ties benefit lengths to economic conditions with the goal of moving benefit recipients back into the workforce during times of low unemployment. State unemployment programs that index their benefits provide shorter periods of benefits during times of low unemployment and longer periods of benefits during times of high unemployment.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 231,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 20,000 for the week ending December 10 to a seasonally adjusted 211,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 230,000 to 231,000. The four-week moving average as of December 10 fell to 227,250 from a revised 230,250 as of the week ending December 3.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 1,000 from the previous week’s revised number to a seasonally adjusted 1.671 million for the week ending December 3. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims rise to 230,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits rose 4,000 for the week ending December 3 to a seasonally adjusted 230,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 225,000 to 226,000. The four-week moving average as of December 3 rose to 230,000 from a revised 229,000 as of the week ending November 26.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 62,000 from the previous week’s revised number to a seasonally adjusted 1.671 million for the week ending November 26. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 225,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 16,000 for the week ending November 26 to a seasonally adjusted 225,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 240,000 to 241,000. The four-week moving average as of November 26 rose to 228,750 from a revised 227,000 as of the week ending November 19.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 57,000 from the previous week’s unrevised number to a seasonally adjusted 1.608 million for the week ending November 19. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

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New York audit indicates over $11 billion in unemployment insurance was stolen during the coronavirus pandemic

The New York Division of State Government Accountability (DSGA) released the results of an audit of the state’s unemployment insurance system on November 15 that indicated over $11 billion were lost to fraud between April 2020 and March 2021.

During that time, the audit said the state paid about $76.3 billion in total unemployment insurance payments. The DSGA also noted the federal government’s estimate of New York’s unemployment insurance fraud rate rose to 14.48% from the previous financial year’s 4.51% estimate. If the federal government’s fraud rate estimate is accurate, about $11 billion were lost to fraud between April 2020 to March 2021.

The DSGA report also said Department of Labor officials ignored reports in 2010 and 2015 that warned of outdated unemployment insurance digital infrastructure. New York Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli said in a statement that the labor department’s outdated software left the state unprepared for the volume of unemployment insurance claims during the pandemic, so “[t]he agency resorted to stop-gap measures to paper over problems, and this proved to be costly to the state, businesses, and New Yorkers.”

Unemployment insurance refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

For more information on unemployment insurance fraud in New York, click here. For information about unemployment insurance fraud across the country, click here.

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U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims fall to 222,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits fell 4,000 for the week ending November 12 to a seasonally adjusted 222,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 225,000 to 226,000. The four-week moving average as of November 12 rose to 221,000 from a revised 219,000 as of the week ending November 5.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 13,000 from the previous week’s revised number to a seasonally adjusted 1.507 million for the week ending November 5. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



U.S. weekly unemployment insurance claims rise to 225,000

New applications for U.S. unemployment insurance benefits rose 7,000 for the week ending November 5 to a seasonally adjusted 225,000. The previous week’s figure was revised up from 217,000 to 218,000. The four-week moving average as of November 5 fell to 218,750 from a revised 219,000 as of the week ending October 29.

The number of continuing unemployment insurance claims, which refers to the number of unemployed workers who filed for benefits at least two weeks ago and are actively receiving unemployment benefits, rose 6,000 from the previous week’s revised number to a seasonally adjusted 1.493 million for the week ending October 29. Reporting for continuing claims lags one week.

Unemployment insurance is a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:

Unemployment insurance

Unemployment insurance fraud