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The top 10 Wisconsin candidates raised 35.8% of all donations

In Wisconsin politics, state-level candidates and PACs raised $55.6 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 21, 2022. More than $19.9 million or 35.8 percent of all donations was raised by the 10 individuals at the top of the list.

Top 10 Wisconsin candidates (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

Here are the 10 Wisconsin candidates who have raised the most money so far in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. 

RankCandidate Name Total DonationsTotal Expenditures
1.Tony Evers$10,383,804.02$3,257,857.58
2.Rebecca Kleefisch$3,380,231.15$979,478.05
3.Jeff Davis$1,743,823.39$1,146,602.21
4.Jill Underly$1,503,583.08$1,510,685.35
5.Josh Kaul$1,093,446.17$257,083.56
6.Lori Kornblum$523,974.28$189,956.84
7.Ryan Owens$408,327.10$402,556.22
8.Shelley Grogan$381,617.24$364,577.71
9.Patrick Testin$249,413.74$117,388.60
10.Deborah Kerr$239,304.20$265,152.70

Donations to top candidates in 10 states during the 2022 election cycle

Among state-level candidates and officeholders, fundraising varies widely. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how donor activity varies across states. Here is how donations to the top 10 Wisconsin candidates compare to nine other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of donations to top 10 candidates, by state

RankStateDonations to Top 10 CandidatesTotal DonationsReporting Period
1Florida$110,704,048.67$532,230,957.551/1/2021 – 2/28/2022
2Texas$105,345,995.42$375,309,268.771/1/2021 – 2/19/2022
3Pennsylvania$34,501,470.61$343,783,026.521/1/2021 – 3/09/2022
4Michigan$25,358,422.95$89,192,492.111/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
5Ohio$24,752,903.97$79,210,717.621/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
6Arizona$22,291,313.55$72,806,908.751/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
7Wisconsin$19,907,524.3755,603,885.141/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
8North Carolina$8,927,365.01$39,859,339.461/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
9Indiana$7,661,472.0249,459,363.581/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
10Minnesota$5,201,704.60$36,935,152.761/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

In some states, officeholders may accept donations to their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Any reported donations by those officeholders are included in candidate donation numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin candidate PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



DPW Segregated Fund outraises every other Wisconsin PAC with $12.45 million

In Wisconsin, the Democratic Party of Wisconsin (DPW) Segregated Fund has raised more than any other non-candidate political action committee (PAC) in the 2022 election cycle so far. According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission, the DPW Segregated Fund raised $12.45 million and spent $XX million between Jan. 1, 2021 and Mar. 21, 2022. 

In Wisconsin politics, donations to the DPW Segregated Fund represent 42.97 percent of the $28.99 million all Wisconsin state-level PACs have raised. Here are the DPW Segregated Fund’s top donors and recipients, as reported to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission.

Donations to the DPW Segregated Fund

Of the $12,453,538 raised in the 2022 election cycle, 62.47 percent came from the DPW Segregated Fund’s top 10 donors.

Top Donations to the DPW Segregated Fund (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$2,381,020.22Karla T JurvetsonINDIVIDUAL
2.$1,480,000.00Sage WeilINDIVIDUAL
3.$960,000.00Elise LawsonINDIVIDUAL
4.$750,000.00George SorosINDIVIDUAL
5.$608,237.10Tony EversENTITY
6.$490,000.00Reid HoffmanINDIVIDUAL
7.$300,000.00Florida Democratic PartyENTITY
8.$290,000.00Lynde B UihleinINDIVIDUAL
9.$270,000.00Robert PriceINDIVIDUAL
10.$250,000.00JB PritzkerINDIVIDUAL

Expenditures by the DPW Segregated Fund

On the expenditures side, the DPW Segregated Fund reported $7,843,750, with 87.4 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping the list. Payees include both contribution recipients and vendors, as filed by the PAC.

Top DPW Segregated Fund Payees (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$2,931,481.29Tony EversENTITY
2.$951,000.46Jill UnderlyENTITY
3.$915,363.01Democratic Party of Wisconsin (Federal Account)ENTITY
4.$903,091.49DPW Federal AccountENTITY
5.$552,869.74Paychex of New York LLCENTITY
6.$204,758.49Davis for JudgeENTITY
7.$118,679.26Cavalier Johnson CampaignENTITY
8.$113,965.00Weymouth WatsonENTITY
9.$83,666.00Strategy Group for MediaENTITY
10.$80,934.60Scasey CommunicationsENTITY

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Wisconsin Speaker Vos raised $131,871 this election cycle

According to the most recent campaign finance reports made to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission, Wisconsin Assembly Speaker Robin Vos has raised $131,871 and spent $16,639 between Jan. 1, 2021 and Mar. 21, 2022.

The speaker of the Wisconsin General Assembly is the leader of the state’s lower chamber. Rep. Vos is a member of the Republican Party and has served as a state representative since 2005. His current term ends in 2023.

Rep. Vos’ reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2021)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Rep. Vos

Of the $131,871 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 53.8 percent came from the top 71 donors who each gave $1000.

Expenditures by Rep. Vos

On the expenditures side, Vos reported $16,639, with 83.2 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by Vos (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

RankPayee Name Total AmountType
1.$3,405.76Heinzen Printing & PromotionalEntity
2.$2,131.24Rep Assembly Campaign Com Racc – Seg FundEntity
3.$1,703.91Internal Revenue ServiceEntity
4.$1,432.10Knights Gourmet PopcornEntity
5.$1,000.00Elijah BehnkeEntity
6.$1,000.00William PentermanEntity
7.$1,000.00World Orphan FundEntity
8.$880.74Paige L GeorgeEntity
9.$735.44Robin Voss CampaignEntity
10.$545.58Village Graphics PrintingEntity

How Rep. Vos’ fundraising compares to other state speakers

Among members of the state legislature, fundraising varies widely. A number of factors, including whether an incumbent officeholder is running for re-election, influence donor activity. Here is how fundraising by Vos compares to the nine other state speakers with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Fundraising reported by 10 state speakers in the 2022 election cycle

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These PACs are the best fundraisers in Wisconsin

In Wisconsin politics, non-candidate political action committees (PACs) have received $22.6 million in total donations between January 1, 2021, and January 31, 2022. The top 10 PACs raised more than $15.6 million, or 69 percent of all donations made to state-level PACs.

These are the top 10 PACs in Wisconsin state-level politics in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission:

Top 10 Wisconsin PACs (1/1/2021 – 1/31/2022)

RankDonor NameTotal Donations
1Democratic Party of Wisconsin – Seg Fund$8,139,012
2Rep Assembly Campaign Com Racc – Seg Fund$1,685,843
3Republican Party of Wisconsin – Seg Fund$1,521,015
4Committee to Elect a Republican Senate – Seg Fund$1,005,628
5A Better Wisconsin Together Political Fund$860,228
6Assembly Democratic Camp Comm – Seg Fund$684,127
7Operating Engineers 139 PAC$525,100
8Weac PAC$504,279
9State Senate Democratic Comm – Seg Fund$413,277
10Rebecca PAC$282,680

A PAC is broadly defined as a group that spends money on elections. They may be established and administered by corporations, labor unions, membership organizations, or trade associations.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Wisconsin Gov. Evers receives $10.4 million, with the Democratic Party of Wisconsin as top donor

In Wisconsin, Gov. Tony Evers is the number one fundraiser in state politics in the 2022 election cycle so far. According to the most recent campaign finance reports made to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission, the governor received $10,383,804 in total contributions and spent $3,257,858 between January 1, 2021 and January 31, 2022. He is running for re-election in 2022.

Gov. Evers is a member of the Democratic Party and first assumed office in 2019.

Gov. Evers’ reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2021)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Gov. Evers

Of the $10.4 million already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 27.9 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Gov. Evers (1/1/2021 – 1/31/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$2,248,206Democratic Party of Wisconsin – Seg FundEntity
2.$86,000American Federation of Teachers Cope FederalEntity
3.$86,000Democratic Governors Association FederalEntity
4.$86,000Engineers Political Education CommitteeEntity
5.$86,000Liuna PACEntity
6.$86,000SEIU COPE – FederalEntity
7.$64,500Democrat Republican Independent Voter Education DRIVE FederalEntity
8.$56,000Wisconsin Carpenters PACEntity
9.$51,000Ibew FederalEntity
10.$48,500WI Laborers District CouncilEntity

Expenditures by Gov. Evers

On the expenditures side, Gov. Evers reported $3.3 million, with 63.5 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping the list. 

Top Expenditures by Gov. Evers (1/1/2021 – 1/31/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$427,791Cleansweep CampaignsEntity
2.$330,089ADP IncEntity
3.$288,206Democratic Party of Wisconsin – Seg FundEntity
4.$214,000Path to Victory LLCEntity
5.$202,184New Blue Interactive LLCEntity
6.$165,692Actblue WisconsinEntity
7.$142,040GbaoEntity
8.$114,177New TerriEntity
9.$101,034Cassi FeniliEntity
10.$84,204Mitchel WallaceEntity

How Gov. Evers’ fundraising compares to other governors

Among elected officials holding the same level of state office, fundraising varies widely. A number of factors, including whether an incumbent officeholder is running for reelection, influence donor activity. Here is how fundraising by Wisconsin Gov. Evers compares to the 10 other governors with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Fundraising reported by 11 U.S. governors in the 2022 election cycle

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



U.S. Supreme Court blocks Wisconsin state legislative maps

The U.S. Supreme Court reversed the Wisconsin Supreme Court’s decision on March 23 adopting Gov. Tony Evers’ (D) state house and senate redistricting maps and remanded the case for further proceedings. The Supreme Court found that the Wisconsin Supreme Court erred in its analysis of precedent on how the U.S. Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause should apply in race-based districting cases.

In its opinion, the Supreme Court wrote: “The question that our [Voting Rights Act of 1965] precedents ask and the court failed to answer is whether a race-neutral alternative that did not add a seventh majority-black district would deny black voters equal political opportunity. Answering that question requires an ‘intensely local appraisal’ of the challenged district.” The Supreme Court ruled the state supreme court did not conduct the appraisal correctly, writing, “When the Wisconsin Supreme Court endeavored to undertake a full strict-scrutiny analysis, it did not do so properly under our precedents, and its judgment cannot stand.”

Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote an opinion dissenting from the court’s judgment, joined by Justice Elena Kagan. In her dissent, Sotomayor wrote: “The Court’s action today is unprecedented…Despite the fact that summary reversals are generally reserved for decisions in violation of settled law, the Court today faults the State Supreme Court for its failure to comply with an obligation that, under existing precedent, is hazy at best.” Sotomayor said because the state court “rightly preserved the possibility that an appropriate plaintiff could bring an equal protection or [Voting Rights Act] challenge in the proper forum,” she “would allow that process to unfold, rather than further complicating these proceedings with legal confusion through a summary reversal.”

The Wisconsin Supreme Court must now reconsider the case and decide how to redraw the state’s legislative districts. According to the U.S. Supreme Court opinion, the state court “is free to take additional evidence if it prefers to reconsider the Governor’s maps rather than choose from among the other submissions. Any new analysis, however, must comply with our equal protection jurisprudence.”

The case is the fourth legal challenge to district maps to reach the U.S. Supreme Court in the 2020 redistricting cycle. In a 5-4 order on Feb. 7, the court allowed a proposed Alabama congressional redistricting map to be implemented while under challenge in federal court for illegal racial gerrymandering in the case Merrill v. Milligan. The court issued orders on March 7 in two redistricting cases, Moore v. Harper in North Carolina and Toth v. Chapman in Pennsylvania, upholding the enacted congressional maps in both states.

Additional reading:



These 10 Wisconsin donors gave over $5.2 million

In Wisconsin politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $48.5 million in total donations between January 1, 2021, and January 31, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $5.2 million, or 11 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Wisconsin state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission:

Top 10 Wisconsin Donors (1/1/2021 – 1/31/2022)

RankDonor NameTotal Donations
1Karla T Jurvetson$1,022,000
2Elise Lawson$1,000,000
3George Soros$750,000
4Elizabeth Uihlein$734,500
5Reid Hoffman$510,000
6Robert Price$270,000
7JB Pritzker$270,000
8Deborah S Kern$256,000
9Edward W Snowdon$220,000
10Lynde B Uihlein$183,240

The list of Wisconsin donors in this time period includes more than 652 individuals identified by name in the Wisconsin Ethics Commission’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Republicans outraise Democrats by 133% in Wisconsin Senate races

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Wisconsin State Senate, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the State Senate submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. It includes activity between January 1, 2021, and January 31, 2022.

Top fundraisers in the Wisconsin State Senate by party

The top fundraisers in Wisconsin State Senate elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Jeff Smith – $63,318
  • Janet Bewley – $44,438
  • Mark Scheffler (District 19) – $34,195
  • Tripp Stroud (District 17) – $26,400
  • Brad Pfaff – $23,297

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Patrick Testin – $249,414
  • John Jagler – $221,593
  • Howard Marklein (District 17) – $197,658
  • Roger Roth – $183,174
  • Devin LeMahieu – $178,627

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $329,593 in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $1.65 million. Combined, all State Senate fundraisers in the January 1, 2021, through January 31, 2022, filing period raised $1.98 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 58 percent of all Democratic State Senate fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 62 percent of all Republican State Senate fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers during this period.

TOP TEN FUNDRAISERS – WISCONSIN STATE SENATE (January 1, 2021, through January 31, 2022)

NameParty AffiliationRaisedSpent
Patrick TestinRepublican Party$249,414$117,389
John JaglerRepublican Party$221,593$233,088
Howard MarkleinRepublican Party$197,658$14,730
Roger RothRepublican Party$183,174$39,422
Devin LeMahieuRepublican Party$178,627$34,513
Dale KooyengaRepublican Party$172,322$22,948
Jeff SmithDemocratic Party$63,318$6,995
Mary FelzkowskiRepublican Party$62,319$27,357
Alberta DarlingRepublican Party$61,338$43,670
Chris KapengaRepublican Party$48,055$6,406

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. In 2022, Transparency USA will publish campaign finance data after the following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Republicans outraise Democrats by 75% in Wisconsin Assembly races

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Wisconsin State Assembly, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the Assembly submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. It includes activity between January 1, 2021, and January 31, 2022.

Top fundraisers in the Wisconsin State Assembly by party

The top fundraisers in Wisconsin State Assembly elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Steve Doyle – $99,607
  • Sara Rodriguez – $95,183
  • Deb Andraca – $63,290
  • Francesca Hong – $32,319
  • Beth Meyers – $27,603

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Robin Vos – $131,871
  • Amy Loudenbeck – $84,829
  • Mark Born – $69,406
  • Elijah Behnke – $66,695
  • William Penterman – $62,455

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $557,441 in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $1.22 million. Combined, all Assembly fundraisers in the January 1, 2021, through January 31, 2022, filing period raised $1.78 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 57 percent of all Democratic Assembly fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 34 percent of all Republican Assembly fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers during this period.

TOP TEN FUNDRAISERS – WISCONSIN STATE ASSEMBLY (January 1, 2021, through January 31, 2022)

NameParty AffiliationRaisedSpent
Robin VosRepublican Party$131,871$16,639
Steve DoyleDemocratic Party$99,607$19,373
Sara RodriguezDemocratic Party$95,183$40,319
Amy LoudenbeckRepublican Party$84,829$18,260
Mark BornRepublican Party$69,406$34,953
Elijah BehnkeRepublican Party$66,695$48,578
Deb AndracaDemocratic Party$63,290$24,214
William PentermanRepublican Party$62,455$63,291
Tony KurtzRepublican Party$61,975$25,768
Cindi DuchowRepublican Party$51,545$2,506

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. In 2022, Transparency USA will publish campaign finance data after the following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Wisconsin enacts new state legislative districts

Wisconsin enacted new state legislative districts on March 3, 2022, when the Wisconsin Supreme Court approved legislative proposals submitted by Gov. Tony Evers (D). The maps will take effect for Wisconsin’s 2022 state legislative elections.

Evers vetoed legislative district proposals from Senate Majority Leader Devin LeMahieu (R) and Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R) on Nov. 18. The Senate had approved the maps 21-12 along party lines on Oct. 20, with all Republicans in the chamber voting for the proposal and all Democrats voting against it. The House passed the maps on Nov. 11 by a 60-38 party-line vote.

After Evers’ veto, the Wisconsin Supreme Court assumed control of the drafting process, as the court had agreed in September to decide new districts if the legislature and governor failed to do so. The court announced on Nov. 30 it would seek to make as few changes as possible to the current legislative and congressional maps adopted in 2011. Evers submitted the now-approved legislative district maps to the supreme court on Dec. 15.

Evers’ office released a statement saying the enacted maps “are significantly less gerrymandered than the state’s current maps and the maps proposed by the Legislature. The governor’s maps have more competitive districts, with two competitive congressional districts, three Senate districts, and eight Assembly districts, which are all highly competitive. By contrast, the maps proposed by the Legislature have only one competitive congressional district, one competitive Senate district, and three competitive Assembly districts.”

LeMahieu said the maps were drawn without public input: “Bipartisan supermajorities rejected the governor’s People’s Maps Commission (PMC) maps, the PMC failed. Now Governor Evers has abandoned his campaign rhetoric promising for independently-drawn maps to rapidly and secretly draw his own rigged maps without public input. The hypocrisy of the governor is impossible to ignore.”

As of March 3, 39 states have adopted legislative district maps for both chambers, and one state has adopted maps that have not yet gone into effect. The state supreme court in one state has overturned previously enacted maps, and nine states have not yet adopted legislative redistricting plans after the 2020 census. As of March 3, 2012, 43 states had enacted legislative redistricting plans after the 2010 census.

Nationwide, states have completed legislative redistricting for 1,655 of 1,972 state Senate seats (83.9%) and 3,884 of 5,411 state House seats (71.8%).

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