Tagwisconsin

Stories about Wisconsin

$13.9 million raised in the race for Wisconsin governor

The general election for Governor of Wisconsin will take place on Nov. 7, 2022. In total, candidates running for Wisconsin governor have raised $13.9 million and spent $4.4 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 21, 2022. The Democratic and Republican primaries are on Aug. 8, 2022.

Here’s the breakdown for the nine candidates who are still in the running:

Active Gubernatorial Candidates’ Campaign Finance, 1/1/2021- 3/21/2022

CandidatePartyContributionsExpendituresElection Stage
Tony Evers (Incumbent)Democratic$10,383,804.02$3,257,857.58Primary
Adam FIscherRepublican$28,369.78$955.94Primary
James KellenRepublican$0.00$0.00Primary
Rebecca KleefischRepublican$3,380,231.15$979,478.05Primary
Tim MichelsRepublican$0.00$0.00Primary
Kevin NicholsonRepublican$0.00$0.00Primary
Timothy RamthunRepublican$3,815.00$0.00Primary
Joan Ellis BeglingerIndependent$37,451.17$31,373.54General
Jess HiselIndependent$33,446.07$41,946.97General

The remaining $66,289 raised in the race for Wisconsin governor went to a candidate who has withdrawn.

Total fundraising in nine gubernatorial races in the 2022 election cycle

A number of factors, including whether an incumbent officeholder is running for re-election and number of candidates in a race, can influence donor activity. Here is how total fundraising by all candidates for Wisconsin governor compares to the eight other gubernatorial races with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

RankStateTotal DonationsTotal CandidatesActive CandidatesElection StageAvailable Reporting Period
1Florida$106,753,1151210Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
2Texas$72,717,055245General Election1/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
3Pennsylvania$55,727,674205General Election1/1/2021 – 6/16/2022
4Arizona$24,376,8841512Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
5Ohio$22,113,46895General Election1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022
6Michigan$20,716,429167Primary Election1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
7California$13,997,678322General Election1/1/2021 – 5/21/2022
8Wisconsin$13,933,407109Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/13/2022
9Minnesota$8,263,0721411Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/30/2022

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin candidate PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Contested state legislative primaries in Wisconsin increase compared to 2020

There are 38 contested state legislative primaries in Wisconsin this year, 16% of the total number of possible primaries, and a 15% increase compared to the 2020 election cycle.

A primary is contested when more candidates file to run than there are nominations available, meaning at least one candidate must lose.

Republican candidates drove the increase this cycle. Of the 38 contested primaries this year, there are nine for Democrats and 29 for Republicans. For Democrats, this is down from 18 in 2020, a 50% decrease. For Republicans, the number increased 93% from 15 in 2020 to 29 in 2022.

Of those 38 contested primaries, nine feature an incumbent, representing 11% of incumbents who filed for re-election. This is the highest rate of incumbents in contested primaries since 2014 when 12% of incumbents faced primary challenges.

All nine incumbents in contested primaries this year are Republicans. No Democratic incumbents who filed for re-election face a contested primary.

Overall, 258 major party candidates—110 Democrats and 148 Republicans—filed to run. All 99 Assembly districts are holding elections this year as are 17 of the 33 Senate districts.

Thirty of those districts are open, meaning no incumbents filed. This guarantees that at least 23% of the legislature will be represented by newcomers next year.

Wisconsin has had a divided government since voters elected Gov. Tony Evers (D) in 2018. Republicans currently hold a 59-38 majority in the Assembly with two vacancies and a 21-12 majority in the Senate.

Wisconsin’s state legislative primaries are scheduled for August 9, the 12th statewide primary date of the 2022 state legislative election cycle.

Additional reading:



Wisconsin attorney general raises $1.1 million this election cycle

According to campaign finance reports filed with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission, Wisconsin Attorney General Josh Kaul has raised $1.1 million and spent $257,084 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 21, 2022. Kaul is currently ranked fifth in state-level donations in the 2022 election cycle.

Kaul is a member of the Democratic Party and assumed office in 2019. In Wisconsin, the attorney general is an elected position. The primary job of a state attorney general is to serve as chief legal adviser to the agencies and legislative organs that make up his or her state’s government, in addition to the citizens residing within the state. Kaul is running for re-election in 2022.

Kaul’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2021)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Kaul

Of the $1.1 million already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 26.1 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Kaul (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$44,000.00Democrat Republican Independent Voter Education DRIVE FederalENTITY
2.$44,000.00Operating Engineers 139 PACENTITY
3.$44,000.00Wisconsin Education Association CouncilENTITY
4.$33,000.00WI Laborers District CouncilENTITY
5.$23,500.00IBEW Local 494 PACENTITY
6.$22,000.00WI Pipe Trades Assn PACENTITY
7.$20,000.00Elise LawsonINDIVIDUAL
8.$20,000.00John C MillerINDIVIDUAL
9.$20,000.00Ronald AbramsonINDIVIDUAL
10.$15,000.00Plumbers Local 75 PACENTITY

Expenditures by Kaul

Kaul reported $257,084 in expenditures, with 90.1 percent going to the 10 payees topping this list. “Payees” are entities or individuals listed as the recipients of campaign expenditures, and may include vendors, campaign accounts, and transfers.

Top Expenditures by Kaul (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$88,000.00Sondra MilkieINDIVIDUAL
2.$28,036.64Deepak JonnalageddaINDIVIDUAL
3.$23,636.37Ruth PosekanyINDIVIDUAL
4.$19,197.53Wells Print and Digital ServicesENTITY
5.$17,000.00Rising Tide Interactive LLCENTITY
6.$15,600.00Ngp Van IncENTITY
7.$13,413.60Actblue WisconsinENTITY
8.$10,964.69US TreasuryENTITY
9.$8,841.74Paragon Payment SolutionsENTITY
10.$6,900.70United States Postal ServiceENTITY

How donations to Kaul compare to the same office in other states

Contributions vary widely among officeholders in the same role. A number of factors, including whether the position is appointed or elected, can influence donor activity. Here is how Kaul’s donations compare to the 10 other attorney generals with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 27 attorney generals are members of the Republican Party and 23 are members of the Democratic Party. Voters elect the attorney general in 43 states, while they are chosen by a state government organ in the other seven. In 2022, 30 states are holding elections for the position.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Wisconsin Democratic candidates have raised $5.6 million more than Republicans

In Wisconsin, state-level candidates have raised $26.6 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 21, 2022. Democratic candidates have raised $12.9 million and Republican candidates have raised $7.3 million. 

Wisconsin Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 126 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have raised the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal Raised
1.Tony Evers$10,383,804.02
2.Josh Kaul$1,093,446.17
3.Melissa Winker$154,691.68
4.Mandela Barnes$107,813.05
5.Steve Doyle$99,607.03
6.Sara Rodriguez$95,183.40
7.Jeff Smith$63,317.53
8.Deb Andraca$63,289.54
9.Angelito Tenorio$51,178.00
10.Janet Bewley$44,438.00

Top 10 Republican candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

During the same time period, 146 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported donations for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal raised
1.Rebecca Kleefisch$3,380,231.15
2.Ryan Owens$408,327.10
3.Patrick Testin$249,413.74
4.John Jagler$221,593.33
5.Howard Marklein$197,658.21
6.Roger Roth$183,174.00
7.Devin Lemahieu$178,627.00
8.Dale Kooyenga$172,322.11
9.Robin Vos$131,870.62
10.Ben Voelkel$116,019.33

In some states, officeholders may accept donations to their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those donations are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin candidate PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



How COVID, race, and gender affected the April 5 school board races in Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

School board incumbents lost at nearly twice the historical average rate in a sample of April 2022 school board contests where candidates offered views on three conflict issues

Ballotpedia identified 141 school districts in Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin that held elections on April 5, where candidates took a stance on race in education, COVID responses, or sex and gender in schools. That is 9.7% of the 1,453 school districts in these states, not all of which held elections on April 5.

There were 334 seats up for election in these 141 districts.

We researched the winning candidates’ stances on these three issues following the elections using media reporting, op-eds, candidate websites, campaign ads, and more. After this, we labeled each candidate as either supporting or opposing. In cases where candidate stances were not readily apparent, we labeled them unclear.

  • Race in education: candidates supporting this issue tend to support expanding the use of curricula related to race and district-specific equity or diversity plans. Candidates opposing this issue tend to oppose these efforts.
  • Responses to the coronavirus pandemic: candidates supporting this issue tend to support or previously supported, mask or vaccine requirements and social distancing or distance learning relating to the pandemic. Candidates opposing this issue tend to oppose these measures their districts took or considered in response to the pandemic.
  • Sex and gender in schools: candidates supporting this issue tend to support expanding sexual education curricula or the use of gender-neutral facilities and learning materials. Candidates opposing this issue tend to oppose these efforts.

Incumbents running for re-election in these 141 districts lost to challengers at a rate nearly twice recent averages.

Over the past four election cycles, from 2018 to 2021, incumbents lost 18% of races where they filed for re-election among those districts within Ballotpedia’s coverage scope.

In the April 5 conflict races, 33% of incumbents lost re-election. This loss rate is higher than that found in our previous study, which examined a separate set of conflict races for school boards across 16 states that held elections on Nov. 2, 2021.

Of the 334 winners in the April 5 conflict races:

  • 120 opposed at least one of these three issues (36%);
  • 149 supported at least one and opposed none (45%); and,
  • 65 had unclear stances on all three (20%).

In our previous Nov. 2, 2021, study, there were 310 seats up for election. In that analysis, we found 30% of winners (94) opposing, 56% (173) supporting, and 14% (43) unclear.

In our April 2022 analysis, 54 candidates took identifiable stances on all three issues. The remaining 280 typically had a mixture of opposing or supporting stances and unclear viewpoints. This was expected: not every race showed signs of conflict on all three issues heading into the elections.

The most common conflict was responses to the coronavirus pandemic, which appeared in 135 districts accounting for 320 seats. Race in education followed, appearing in 108 districts with 258 seats. Sex and gender appeared in 69 districts accounting for 159 seats.

When looking at specific conflicts, in districts where we identified a conflict regarding responses to the coronavirus pandemic, a plurality of winners—124, or 39%—took stances supportive of things like mask requirements or social distancing. Ninety-nine winners (31%) took opposing stances and 97 winners (30%) had unclear stances.

In districts with conflicts regarding race in education, a plurality of winners—105, or 41%—took stances supportive of curricula that included topics regarding race or diversity, equity, and inclusion plans. Seventy-seven winners (30%) had opposing stances and 76 winners (30%) had unclear stances.

In districts where we identified conflicts regarding sex and gender in schools, a majority of winners—90, or 57%—had unclear stances regarding topics like sexual education curricula or the usage of gender-specific facilities. Forty winners (25%) took opposing stances and 29 (18%) had supportive stances.

In total, 233 incumbents filed for re-election, leaving 101 seats open, guaranteed to be won by newcomers. That represents 30% of the seats up for election. This is similar to what we see among school board districts within our coverage scope in the ten years we have been covering school board elections.

It also represents a decrease from the school board conflicts analysis Ballotpedia conducted following the November 2021 elections. In that sample, nearly half of the seats up for election were open.

This implies that incumbents were not retiring at an increased rate in these 141 school districts.

Using the link below, you can find a complete list of school districts where Ballotpedia has identified one of the three conflicts present in school board elections from 2021 to 2022.

Conflicts in school board elections, 2021-2022



Wisconsin Democratic candidates have spent $1.4 million more than Republicans

In Wisconsin, state-level candidates spent $13.3 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 21, 2022. Democratic candidates spent $4.7 million and Republican candidates spent $3.3 million. 

Wisconsin Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 126 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal Spent
1.Tony Evers$3,257,857.58
2.Josh Kaul$257,083.56
3.Mandela Barnes$191,618.56
4.Melissa Winker$122,730.75
5.Sarah Godlewski$61,703.04
6.Sara Rodriguez$40,318.69
7.Paul Czisny$40,132.00
8.Karl Jaeger$30,376.87
9.Brad Pfaff$26,502.49
10.Louis J Molepske Jr$26,311.32

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

During the same time period, 146 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal Spent
1.Rebecca Kleefisch$979,478.05
2.Ryan Owens$402,556.22
3.John Jagler$233,087.97
4.Patrick Testin$117,388.60
5.Don Pridemore$81,541.58
6.William Penterman$63,291.49
7.Jonathan Wichmann$60,350.96
8.Elijah Behnke$48,578.11
9.Alberta Darling$43,669.90
10.Eric Toney$43,323.63

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin candidate PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $101,978 from Wisconsin campaign accounts; other states reported millions

In Wisconsin, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $101,978 from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.29 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 21, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Wisconsin campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $101,978 spent with Facebook, 87.47 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 3/21/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$37,500.00Demand Justice PACNon-candidate PAC
2.$18,500.00Planned Parenthood Advocates of Wisconsin Political FundNon-candidate PAC
3.$12,485.95Jonathan WichmannCandidate PAC
4.$8,506.52Waukesha County Democratic PartyNon-candidate PAC
5.$2,482.93Karl JaegerCandidate PAC
6.$2,360.42Francesca HongCandidate PAC
7.$2,153.57David VarnamCandidate PAC
8.$1,869.89Wisconsin Conservation Voters Independent Expenditure CommitteeNon-candidate PAC
9.$1,736.77Mark SchefflerCandidate PAC
10.$1,600.00Wisconsin Muslim Civic Alliance IncNon-candidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Here is how spending with Facebook in Wisconsin compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Wisconsin Secretary of State raises no money this election cycle

According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission, Wisconsin Secretary of State Douglas La Follette has raised no money between Jan. 1, 2021 and Mar. 21, 2022. 

La Follette is a member of the Democratic Party and has served in his current office since 1983, with a previous term from 1975-1979. In Wisconsin, the secretary of state is an elected position. Duties vary by state but are generally administrative in nature and may include recordkeeping, certification of state documents, and serving as chief election official. La Follette is running for reelection in 2022.

How donations to La Follette compare to the same office in other states

Contributions vary widely among officeholders in the same role. A number of factors, including whether the position is appointed or elected, can influence donor activity. Here is how La Follette compares to the 10 other state and commonwealth secretaries with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 27 secretaries of state are members of the Republican Party and 20 are members of the Democratic Party. Voters elect the secretary of state in 35 states, while they are appointed by either the governor or state legislature in the other 12. Alaska, Hawaii, and Utah do not have secretaries of state. In 2022, 27 states are holding elections for the position.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Mellen School District votes to prohibit race from being discussed during American history lessons

The Mellon School Board in Wisconsin voted on April 20, 2022, to adopt a new policy to prohibit race from being discussed during American history lessons. This decision follows a vote in March that barred subjects such as critical race theory, religion, sexual orientation, privilege, empathy, and political orientation from being taught in classrooms. 

The school board’s new policy adopted its language following survey responses from parents. Besides barring discussions of race during history lessons, the new policy states that gender and sexual orientation can be discussed using only what is described as fact-based information rather than theory or discussion. Teachers are allowed to address topics such as privilege but cannot discuss race when doing so. Similarly, educators may talk about equity but are prohibited from mentioning race, sexual orientation, or gender identity.

According to the survey conducted by Mellen School District, 72% of responders opposed teaching sexual orientation; 73% opposed teaching gender identity; 66% opposed teaching critical race theory, and 68% opposed teaching white privilege. Conversely, 64% of responders support teaching empathy, 58% supported teaching inclusion, and 56% support teaching anti-racism.

Eight teachers submitted a letter to the board against the new policy. They argue the policy will deprive students of the opportunity to practice the reasoning and communication skills necessary to develop and defend their own opinion regarding these topics, according to the Ashland Daily Press



Here are the top 10 places Wisconsin candidates and PACs are spending campaign money

In Wisconsin politics, state-level candidates and PACs spent $34.71 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022. More than $6.01 million or 17.30 percent of all campaign finance expenditures went to the 10 payees at the top of the list. 

A payee is an entity or individual who has received money from a campaign account. Candidates and PACs must report campaign expenditures, including payments to vendors, donations to other campaign accounts, and bank transfers, to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission.

Top 10 Wisconsin payees (1/1/2021 – 3/21/22)

Here are the top 10 recipients of Wisconsin campaign money in the 2022 election cycle, as of the most recent reports. 

RankPayee Name Total Received
1.Strother Nuckels Strategies$960,640.46
2.Democratic Party of Wisconsin (Federal Account)$915,363.01
3.DPW Federal Account$903,528.49
4.Targeted Media Platform LLC$780,210.00
5.Paychex of New York LLC$552,869.74
6.Cleansweep Campaigns$427,791.34
7.Pointer Marketing Inc$388,985
8.Scasey Communications$377,067.68
9.Gps Impact$369,167.88
10.Adp Inc$330,089.34

Total Expenditures in nine states during the 2022 election cycle

Campaign finance expenditures vary widely among state-level candidates and PACs. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how expenditure activity varies across states. Here is how total campaign finance expenditures in Wisconsin compared to eight other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total expenditures, by state

RankStateTotal ExpendituresReporting Period
1Texas$337,432,3511/1/2022 – 2/19/2022
2Pennsylvania$319,374,3891/1/2022 – 3/9/2022
3Florida$302,254,1341/1/2022 – 2/28/2022
4Michigan$71,971,7871/1/2022 – 4/20/2022
5Arizona63,716,6171/1/2022 – 3/31/2022
6Ohio$59,240,3971/1/2022 – 4/13/2022
7Wisconsin$34,706,0221/1/2022 – 3/21/2022
8Indiana$32,159,3981/1/2022 – 4/8/2022
9North Carolina$22,543,0371/1/2022 – 12/31/2021

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.