Filing period ends for state executive, legislative, judicial candidates in five states

The filing deadlines to run for state-level offices in Alaska, Kansas, Wisconsin, Hawaii, and Minnesota have passed. Alaska’s, Kansas’, and Wisconsin’s filing deadlines were on June 1. The filing deadlines in Hawaii and Minnesota were on June 2.

In Alaska, prospective candidates filed for the following state offices:
• State Senate (10 seats)
• State House (40 seats)
• Additionally, Alaska will hold retention elections for one supreme court justice and one court of appeals justice.

In Kansas, prospective candidates filed for the following state offices:
• State Board of Education (5 seats)
• State Senate (40 seats)
• State House (125 seats)
• Additionally, Kansas will hold retention elections for two supreme court justices and six court of appeals justices.
• Ballotpedia is also covering local elections in Sedgwick County, Kansas.

In Wisconsin, prospective candidates filed for the following state legislative offices:
• State Senate (16 seats)
• State House (99 seats)

In Hawaii, prospective candidates filed for the following state offices:
• Office of Hawaiian Affairs (4 seats)
• State Senate (13 seats)
• State House (51 seats)
• Ballotpedia is also covering local elections in Honolulu, Hawaii.

In Minnesota, prospective candidates filed for the following state offices:
• State Senate (67 seats)
• State House (134 seats)
• Supreme Court (2 seats)
• Court of Appeals (6 seats)

Ballotpedia is also covering local elections in the following areas:
• Minneapolis Public Schools (4 seats)
• Minneapolis, Minnesota
• Hennepin County, Minnesota
• Ramsey County, Minnesota

Kansas’ primary is scheduled for August 4, and Hawaii’s primary is scheduled for August 8. Minnesota’s and Wisconsin’s primaries are scheduled for August 11. Alaska’s primary will be held on August 18. The general elections in all five states are scheduled for November 3, 2020.

The next statewide filing deadline is on June 11 in Connecticut.

Hawaii has a Democratic state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers. Alaska, Kansas, Wisconsin, and Minnesota have divided governments where no party holds a trifecta.

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About the author

Jaclyn Beran

Jackie Beran is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

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