CategoryState

Campaign finance deadline today in California

Candidates and organizations involved in California’s statewide elections must file campaign finance information by September 29, 2022. The general election will take place in California on November 8, 2022.

What state-level offices are on the ballot this year in California?

Want to review the campaign finance data in California so far? Click here to explore the data on Transparency USA.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here. 



All candidates for Ohio House of Representatives District 24 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Ohio House of Representatives District 24 — Dani Isaacsohn (D) and Adam Koehler (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. Thesesurvey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Ohio’s state legislature. Ohio is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Isaacsohn:           

  1. “Economy and Careers: Free Community College and Apprenticeships.”
  2. “Gun Violence and Safety: Common Sense Solutions.” 
  3. “Universal Pre K.” 

Koehler:       

  1. “Education”
  2. “Affordable housing”
  3. “Safety”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

  1. Dani Isaacsohn
  2. Adam Koehler

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area tofill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Ohio House of Representatives election, 2022



All candidates for Missouri State Senate District 26 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Missouri State Senate District 26 — John Kiehne (D) and Ben Brown (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Missouri’s state legislature. Missouri is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Kiehne:       

“Education from childcare to post-secondary, General and Reproductive Healthcare, ensuring that there is Justice for ALL Missourians including women, minorities, and LGBTQ individuals, supporting and expanding Missouri’s small businesses, repairing, maintaining, and improving our state’s infrastructure, Worker’s Right including the right to organize and collectively bargain…”

Brown:               

“END ABUSIVE GOVERNMENT OVERREACH As a small business owner, Ben Brown saw first-hand how out of control government overreach destroyed our local economies during the COVID-19 shut downs. Ben Brown led the local fight to reopen our businesses and is now ready to fight for you in Jefferson City to make sure the unchecked power of government bureaucracies is finally reigned in.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

  1. John Kiehne
  2. Ben Brown

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Missouri State Senate election, 2022



Virginia education agency proposes policies to clarify approaches to transgender students in public schools

The Virginia Department of Education proposed new policies on September 16, 2022, that aim to provide guidance to the state’s public schools on the Youngkin administration’s preferred approaches to transgender students. 

The new policies depart from former Democratic Governor Ralph Northam’s administration guidelines, which encouraged schools to let students use names and pronouns aligning with their gender identity without formal documentation. Titled 2022 Model Policies On The Privacy, Dignity, And Respect For All Students And Parents In Virginia’s Public Schools, the new education policy mandate the following approaches:

  • Transgender students must use the bathrooms and locker rooms that align with their assigned sex at birth
  • The legal name and sex of a student cannot be changed even with written instruction from a parent or student unless official legal documentation or a court order is presented
  • Teachers and school officials are only allowed to refer to a student by the pronouns associated with their sex at birth
  • Teachers are not required to use a student’s preferred name regardless of written instruction if they believe doing so would violate their constitutionally protected rights

The Virginia Department of Education stated that the policy “reaffirms the rights of parents to determine how their children will be raised and educated. Empowering parents is not only a fundamental right, but it is essential to improving outcomes for all children in Virginia.”

In response to the policy proposal, Mike Mullin, a Democratic member of the Virginia House of Delegates, tweeted, “Trans kids deserve to learn and thrive in an environment free of bullying, intimidation, and fear. That means being addressed as who they are and supported for who they will be. Especially from their teachers and their administrators.”

The general public will be allowed to comment on the proposed policy using the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall website. 

Additional reading:



Federal judge rules in favor of experimental Georgia Medicaid program

U.S. District Judge Lisa Godbey Wood ruled August 19 in favor of Georgia after the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) rescinded a Medicaid waiver for the state’s Pathways to Coverage program. Georgia brought the lawsuit after CMS under the Trump administration approved the state’s Section 1115 application for the waiver in October 2020 and then rescinded the waiver in early 2021 under the Biden administration, formally denying the application in December 2021. Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) sent a letter notifying CMS that the state was filing a lawsuit on January 19, 2022.

Judge Wood said CMS’ 2021 decision to revoke the waiver authorizing Georgia’s experimental Pathways to Coverage program was arbitrary and capricious.

Georgia officials say the Pathway to Coverage program would extend Medicaid assistance to additional individuals below the federal poverty line. It would offer healthcare coverage to individuals who work at least 80 hours per month or spend at least 80 hours per month engaged in another qualifying activity (including college, community service, and vocational training) who would not otherwise qualify for assistance under traditional Medicaid programs. The program would also cover health premiums for qualifying individuals with insurance from their employers.

The program would not establish new qualifications for individuals currently eligible for Medicaid.

CMS has not yet filed to appeal the decision.

Additional reading:



Campaign finance deadline today in Wisconsin

Candidates and organizations involved in Wisconsin’s statewide elections must file campaign finance information by September 27, 2022. The general election will take place in Wisconsin on November 8, 2022.

What state-level offices are on the ballot this year in Wisconsin?

Want to review the campaign finance data in Wisconsin so far? Click here to explore the data on Transparency USA.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here. 



Campaign finance deadline today in Pennsylvania

Candidates and organizations involved in Pennsylvania’s statewide elections must file campaign finance information by September 27, 2022. The general election will take place in Pennsylvania on November 8, 2022.

What state-level offices are on the ballot this year in Pennsylvania?

Want to review the campaign finance data in Pennsylvania so far? Click here to explore the data on Transparency USA.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here. 



These 10 Texas donors gave over $36.8 million

In Texas politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $597.5 million in total donations between Jan. 1, 2021, and June 30, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $36.8 million, or 6 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Texas state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to campaign finance reports submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission:

Top 10 Texas Donors (1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022)

Rank Donor Name Total Donations
1 Janet L Duncan $6,438,606
2 Timothy M and Terri Dunn $5,617,500
3 Richard Weekley $4,843,834
4 H Ross Perot Jr $3,576,861
5 S Javaid Anwar $3,323,900
6 Kenny A and Lisa Troutt $3,079,651
7 John L and Barbara Nau III $2,576,629
8 Harlan R Crow $2,518,000
9 Michael & Mary Porter $2,445,000
10 Farris & JoAnn Wilks $2,402,500

The list of Texas donors in this time period includes more than 9,491 individuals identified by name in the Texas Ethics Commission’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days) 2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff 5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days) 10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days) 10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data 1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These 10 Virginia donors gave over $21.3 million

In Virginia politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $54.2 million in total donations between Jan. 1, 2022, and June 30, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $21.3 million, or 39 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Virginia state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2023 election cycle, according to campaign finance reports submitted to the Virginia Department of Elections:

Top 10 Virginia Donors (1/1/2022 – 6/30/2022)

Rank Donor Name Total Donations
1 Glenn Youngkin $20,000,000
2 Michael Bills $390,000
3 Sonjia S Smith $193,000
4 Ronald D Abramson $162,667
5 Charles Hobbs $100,125
6 Chris Perry $100,000
7 Tiffany Brooks $100,000
8 Paul B Manning $90,119
9 Leonard A Bennett $81,000
10 Timothy Chapman $75,000

The list of Virginia donors in this time period includes more than 622 individuals identified by name in the Virginia Department of Elections’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Virginia PACs submitted to the Virginia Department of Elections. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/15/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual (and Post-Primary) 7/15/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual 1/15/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These 10 Wisconsin donors gave over $17.7 million

In Wisconsin politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $118.0 million in total donations between Jan. 1, 2021, and July 25, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $17.7 million, or 15 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Wisconsin state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to campaign finance reports submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission:

Top 10 Wisconsin Donors (1/1/2021 – 7/25/2022)

Rank Donor Name Total Donations
1 Richard Uihlein $4,585,000
2 Karla T Jurvetson $3,555,020
3 Elizabeth Uihlein $2,712,500
4 Sage Weil $1,547,350
5 George Soros $1,500,000
6 Elise Lawson $1,000,600
7 Reid Hoffman $1,000,000
8 Diane M Hendricks $673,500
9 Edward W Snowdon $615,000
10 JB Pritzker $520,000

The list of Wisconsin donors in this time period includes more than 965 individuals identified by name in the Wisconsin Ethics Commission’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary 2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election 3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary 8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data 9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General 10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual 1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.