CategoryState

Here are the top 10 places Ohio candidates and PACs are spending campaign money

In Ohio politics, state-level candidates and PACs spent $59.24 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 13, 2022. More than $10.65 million or 17.98 percent of all campaign finance expenditures went to the 10 payees at the top of the list. 

A payee is an entity or individual who has received money from a campaign account. Candidates and PACs must report campaign expenditures, including payments to vendors, donations to other campaign accounts, and bank transfers, to the Ohio Secretary of State.

Top 10 Ohio payees (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

Here are the top 10 recipients of Ohio campaign money in the 2022 election cycle, as of the most recent reports. 

RankPayee Name Total Received
1.SRCP Media Inc$2,352,953.88
2.Al Media$1,633,120.00
3.Sage Media$1,202,723.10
4.Ascent Media LLC$1,108,185.84
5.Advanced Micro Targeting Inc$1,050,000.00
6.Left Hook Communications$1,000,000.00
7.Paychex$715,733.82
8.National Payment Corporation$576,729.83
9.Minnesota Democratic Farm Labor Party$560,000.00
10.Red Brick Strategies$451,001.96

Total Expenditures in nine states during the 2022 election cycle

Campaign finance expenditures vary widely among state-level candidates and PACs. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how expenditure activity varies across states. Here is how total campaign finance expenditures in Ohio compared to eight other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total expenditures, by state

RankStateTotal ExpendituresReporting Period
1Texas$337,432,3511/1/2022 – 2/19/2022
2Pennsylvania$319,374,3891/1/2022 – 3/9/2022
3Florida$302,254,1341/1/2022 – 2/28/2022
4Michigan$71,971,7871/1/2022 – 4/20/2022
5Arizona63,716,6171/1/2022 – 3/31/2022
6Ohio$59,240,3971/1/2022 – 4/13/2022
7Wisconsin$34,706,0221/1/2022 – 3/21/2022
8Indiana$32,159,3981/1/2022 – 4/8/2022
9North Carolina$22,543,0371/1/2022 – 12/31/2021

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Here are the top 10 places Michigan candidates and PACs are spending campaign money

In Michigan politics, state-level candidates and PACs spent $71.97 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 20, 2022. More than $16.74 million or 23.26 percent of all campaign finance expenditures went to the 10 payees at the top of the list. 

A payee is an entity or individual who has received money from a campaign account. Candidates and PACs must report campaign expenditures, including payments to vendors, donations to other campaign accounts, and bank transfers, to the Michigan Secretary of State.

Top 10 Michigan payees (1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022)

Here are the top 10 recipients of Michigan campaign money in the 2022 election cycle, as of the most recent reports. 

RankPayee Name Total Received
1.Fieldworks LLC$4,973,008.06
2.National Petition Management Inc$2,597,849.75
3.K2K Consulting LLC$2,081,183.33
4.Run the World Digital$1,713,564.32
5.MRP Federal Account$1,440,436.60
6.Field Works LLC$1,054,436.37
7.Paychex Inc$1,037,992.86
8.Campaign Works LLC$776,387.86
9.Strategic Media Placement$537,040.00
10.Pinpoint Media LLC$530,864.00

Total Expenditures in nine states during the 2022 election cycle

Campaign finance expenditures vary widely among state-level candidates and PACs. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how expenditure activity varies across states. Here is how total campaign finance expenditures in Michigan compared to eight other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total expenditures, by state

RankStateTotal ExpendituresReporting Period
1Texas$337,432,3511/1/2022 – 2/19/2022
2Pennsylvania$319,374,3891/1/2022 – 3/9/2022
3Florida$302,254,1341/1/2022 – 2/28/2022
4Michigan$71,971,7871/1/2022 – 4/20/2022
5Arizona63,716,6171/1/2022 – 3/31/2022
6Ohio$59,240,3971/1/2022 – 4/13/2022
7Wisconsin$34,706,0221/1/2022 – 3/21/2022
8Indiana$32,159,3981/1/2022 – 4/8/2022
9North Carolina$22,543,0371/1/2022 – 12/31/2021

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
2022 Pre-General10/28/2023
2022 Post-General12/8/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Here are the top 10 places Wisconsin candidates and PACs are spending campaign money

In Wisconsin politics, state-level candidates and PACs spent $34.71 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Mar. 31, 2022. More than $6.01 million or 17.30 percent of all campaign finance expenditures went to the 10 payees at the top of the list. 

A payee is an entity or individual who has received money from a campaign account. Candidates and PACs must report campaign expenditures, including payments to vendors, donations to other campaign accounts, and bank transfers, to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission.

Top 10 Wisconsin payees (1/1/2021 – 3/21/22)

Here are the top 10 recipients of Wisconsin campaign money in the 2022 election cycle, as of the most recent reports. 

RankPayee Name Total Received
1.Strother Nuckels Strategies$960,640.46
2.Democratic Party of Wisconsin (Federal Account)$915,363.01
3.DPW Federal Account$903,528.49
4.Targeted Media Platform LLC$780,210.00
5.Paychex of New York LLC$552,869.74
6.Cleansweep Campaigns$427,791.34
7.Pointer Marketing Inc$388,985
8.Scasey Communications$377,067.68
9.Gps Impact$369,167.88
10.Adp Inc$330,089.34

Total Expenditures in nine states during the 2022 election cycle

Campaign finance expenditures vary widely among state-level candidates and PACs. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how expenditure activity varies across states. Here is how total campaign finance expenditures in Wisconsin compared to eight other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total expenditures, by state

RankStateTotal ExpendituresReporting Period
1Texas$337,432,3511/1/2022 – 2/19/2022
2Pennsylvania$319,374,3891/1/2022 – 3/9/2022
3Florida$302,254,1341/1/2022 – 2/28/2022
4Michigan$71,971,7871/1/2022 – 4/20/2022
5Arizona63,716,6171/1/2022 – 3/31/2022
6Ohio$59,240,3971/1/2022 – 4/13/2022
7Wisconsin$34,706,0221/1/2022 – 3/21/2022
8Indiana$32,159,3981/1/2022 – 4/8/2022
9North Carolina$22,543,0371/1/2022 – 12/31/2021

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Here are the top 10 places North Carolina candidates and PACs are spending campaign money

In North Carolina politics, state-level candidates and PACs spent $22.5 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Dec. 31, 2021. More than $2.7 million or 12.0 percent of all campaign finance expenditures went to the 10 payees at the top of the list. 

A payee is an entity or individual who has received money from a campaign account. Candidates and PACs must report campaign expenditures, including payments to vendors, donations to other campaign accounts, and bank transfers, to the North Carolina State Board of Elections.

Top 10 North Carolina payees (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

Here are the top 10 recipients of North Carolina campaign money in the 2022 election cycle, as of the most recent reports. 

RankPayee Name Total Received
1.Nexus Strategies Inc$562,903.73
2.North Carolina Republican House Caucus$320,990.95
3.Conservative Connections$246,075.00
4.ADP as Depository for Payroll Taxes$240,385.45
5.Sinclair Public Affairs LLC$236,388.05
6.Whillier Group Inc$234,323.03
7.Stewart Group Inc$232,185.50
8.Baker Hostetler$215,000.00
9.Ngp Van Inc$211,196.21
10.Minnesota Democratic Farmer Labor Party$205,000.00

Total Expenditures in nine states during the 2022 election cycle

Campaign finance expenditures vary widely among state-level candidates and PACs. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how expenditure activity varies across states. Here is how total campaign finance expenditures in North Carolina compared to eight other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total expenditures, by state

RankStateTotal ExpendituresReporting Period
1Texas$337,432,3511/1/2022 – 2/19/2022
2Pennsylvania$319,374,3891/1/2022 – 3/9/2022
3Florida$302,254,1341/1/2022 – 2/28/2022
4Michigan$71,971,7871/1/2022 – 4/20/2022
5Arizona63,716,6171/1/2022 – 3/31/2022
6Ohio$59,240,3971/1/2022 – 4/13/2022
7Wisconsin$34,706,0221/1/2022 – 3/21/2022
8Indiana$32,159,3981/1/2022 – 4/8/2022
9North Carolina$22,543,0371/1/2022 – 12/31/2021

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Semiannual1/28/2022
2022 Q1 Plus5/10/2022
2022 Semiannual (only candidates not on 2022 ballot)7/29/2022
2022 Q3 Plus10/31/2022
2022 Q41/11/2023
2022 Year End Semiannual (only candidates not on 2022 ballot)1/27/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Here are the top 10 places Texas candidates and PACs are spending campaign money

In Texas politics, state-level candidates and PACs spent $337.43 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Feb. 19, 2022. More than $64.59 million or 19.14 percent of all campaign finance expenditures went to the 10 payees at the top of the list. 

A payee is an entity or individual who has received money from a campaign account. Candidates and PACs must report campaign expenditures, including payments to vendors, donations to other campaign accounts, and bank transfers, to the Texas Ethics Commission.

Top 10 Texas payees (1/1/2021 – 2/19/2022)

Here are the top 10 recipients of Texas campaign money in the 2022 election cycle, as of the most recent reports. 

RankPayee Name Total Received
1.Frost Bank$17,571,337.84
2.CrossRoads Media LLC$8,746,014.03
3.Political Communications Advertising$6,782,745.10
4.Murphy Nasica & Associates$6,683,970.78
5.Cross Screen Media$6,546,414.35
6.Department of US Treasury IRS$4,907,148.25
7.Strategic Media Services$4,150,587.33
8.Paychex Inc$3,183,144.04
9.Targeted Victory$3,106,898.35
10.FP1 Strategies LLC$2,916,529.18

Total Expenditures in nine states during the 2022 election cycle

Campaign finance expenditures vary widely among state-level candidates and PACs. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how expenditure activity varies across states. Here is how total campaign finance expenditures in Texas compared to eight other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total expenditures, by state

RankStateTotal ExpendituresReporting Period
1Texas$337,432,3511/1/2022 – 2/19/2022
2Pennsylvania$319,374,3891/1/2022 – 3/9/2022
3Florida$302,254,1341/1/2022 – 2/28/2022
4Michigan$71,971,7871/1/2022 – 4/20/2022
5Arizona63,716,6171/1/2022 – 3/31/2022
6Ohio$59,240,3971/1/2022 – 4/13/2022
7Wisconsin$34,706,0221/1/2022 – 3/21/2022
8Indiana$32,159,3981/1/2022 – 4/8/2022
9North Carolina$22,543,0371/1/2022 – 12/31/2021

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



One bill has passed during Missouri’s 2022 legislative session and one week remains

One week remains in the Missouri legislative session and there has been one bill passed by both the House and Senate and signed by Gov. Mike Parson (R). House Bill 3014 is an appropriations bill signed on Feb. 24, 2022. There have been a total of 11 resolutions adopted between the two chambers. The most recent resolutions were adopted on April 27.

According to PR Newswire, next to Alaska, the Missouri state legislature passed the fewest number of bills in 2021, passing 58 bills. By the first week of May in 2021, there had been four bills to pass both chambers of the Missouri General Assembly and be signed by Parson. Texas passed the highest number of bills in 2021, enacting 3,849 in total. 

The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. It is a bicameral legislature composed of a 34-member Senate and a 163-member House of Representatives. Senators are term limited to two terms and representatives are limited to four. The Missouri General Assembly is a part-time legislature. The 2022 session convened on Jan. 5 and will adjourn May 13. 

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. The Republicans have a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. In the event of a veto issued by Gov. Parson, the Republican majority is large enough to override the veto without any votes from members of the Democratic party. 

Additional reading:



Two months to voter registration deadline for Missouri’s primary

The voter registration deadline for Missouri’s 2022 primary election is two months away. Those who wish to vote in-person must be registered by July 6. Registration is possible online, in-person, or by mail. If registration forms are mailed, they must be postmarked on or before July 6. The primary is scheduled for Aug. 2.

A primary election is used to narrow the field of candidates for certain positions or to determine the political party nominees before a general election. Missouri has an open primary. Voters are not required to be affiliated with a political party in order to vote in that party’s primary. Voters are also able to declare any party at the polls regardless of previous party affiliation. 

In the Missouri primary, voters throughout the state will select one candidate to serve in the U.S. Senate, eight candidates to serve in the House of Representatives, a state auditor, 17 state senators, and 163 state representatives. Clay County, Jackson County, Platte County, and the city of St. Louis have several municipal positions that will be on the ballot. Using Ballotpedia’s sample ballot lookup tool, voters can find the candidates that will be on their ballot on Aug. 2. 

The state of Missouri does not have early voting. Those who qualify for an absentee ballot must have their request form received in the mail by July 20. 

Additional reading:



Idaho Republican gubernatorial primary includes sitting governor and lieutenant governor for first time since 1938

Eight candidates are running in the Republican primary for governor of Idaho on May 17. Incumbent Gov. Brad Little and Janice McGeachin, the state’s current lieutenant governor, lead in fundraising and media attention.

Idaho is one of 17 states where the lieutenant governor is nominated in a separate primary and elected in a separate general election from the governor. According to the Idaho Press‘s Betsy Russell, an incumbent Idaho governor has not been challenged in a primary by the lieutenant governor since 1938. 

The Idaho Statesman’s Ryan Suppe said of Little and McGeachin, “The two former allies … have had a tense relationship in recent years.” Much of that tension has revolved around responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. In two instances in 2021, McGeachin issued executive orders related to COVID-19 measures—the first, while Little was at a Republican Governors Association meeting, banning mask mandates, and the second, while Little was at the U.S.-Mexico border, expanding a prohibition against state entities requiring vaccination or testing. Little rescinded both orders the following day.

The Idaho Constitution says that if the governor is absent from the state, the duties of the office transfer to the lieutenant governor. McGeachin and Little disagreed on whether the Idaho Constitution transfers the duties of the governor’s office to the lieutenant governor in the event of the governor’s physical absence or effective absence.

Little is running on his record, saying that his first term was “marked by historic tax relief, unparalleled red tape reduction, extraordinary economic growth, and unprecedented investments in education.” He said, “During my first term, together, we achieved billions in historic tax relief, record investments in transportation, and continued our strong support for education in Idaho.” Little said, “I am committed to continuing to lead Idaho with my goal for Idaho in mind to make Idaho the place where we all can have the opportunity to thrive, where our children and grandchildren choose to stay, and for the ones who have left to choose to return.” The National Rifle Association Political Victory Fund and the Idaho Fraternal Order of Police endorsed Little.

McGeachin said she is “running for Governor to restore the principles that have Made Idaho Great — individual liberty, state sovereignty, and traditional conservative values.” She said she is a “proven conservative leader with an established track record of working with others to promote fiscal responsibility.” McGeachin said, “My campaign has been endorsed by President Trump because I stand for America First policies including individual liberty, election integrity, a strong and secure border, school choice, energy independence, reducing taxes and regulations, and supporting American businesses.” Former President Donald Trump (R) endorsed McGeachin in Nov. 2021.

Also running in the primary are Steven Bradshaw, Ben Cannady, Ed Humphreys, Ashley Jackson, Lisa Marie, and Cody Usabel. 

Major independent observers rate the general election as Solid/Safe Republican. Republicans have had trifecta control of Idaho state government since 1995. The last time a Democrat was elected to statewide office in Idaho was for superintendent of public instruction in 2002.



Indiana primaries result in more defeated state legislative incumbents than at any point since 2012

Six state legislative incumbents—all Republicans—lost in Indiana’s May 3 primaries, the most since 2012. This represents 20% of the 30 incumbents who faced primary challengers and 5% of the 114 incumbents who filed for re-election.

The incumbents who lost are:

Only Republican incumbents have lost in state legislative primaries since 2012. The last Democratic incumbent defeated in a contested primary was Rep. Greg Simms, who lost in 2008.

Three of the six incumbent defeats were guaranteed heading into the primaries due to redistricting. In these races, two incumbents ran against each other after being drawn into the same district, meaning at least one would lose:

  • House District 22: Rep. Craig Snow defeated Nisly after Snow, who previously represented House District 18, was drawn into Nisly’s district. Nisly was first elected in 2014 after defeating incumbent Rep. Rebecca Kubacki in that year’s Republican primary.
  • House District 45: Rep. Bruce Borders defeated Ellington. Ellington previously represented House District 62 but was drawn into Borders’ district.
  • Senate District 47: Sen. Kevin Boehnlein defeated Byrne after Boehnlein, who previously represented Senate District 46, was drawn into Byrne’s district. 

Four of these primaries were among the top 10 races in terms of fundraising thus far this cycle. In three of those races, the candidate who raised the most money won. In House District 50, incumbent Leonard outraised his challenger, Lorissa Sweet, and lost.

The six incumbents defeated in Indiana’s primary elections bring the total number of incumbents defeated up to seven nationwide this cycle. One Democratic incumbent—Rep. Art Fierro—lost in an incumbent v. incumbent primary in Texas on March 1. Across Indiana and Texas, there were 74 incumbents in primary challenges with 9.5% resulting in incumbent defeats.

Additional reading:



Alabama U.S. House races to feature the fewest open seats since 2018

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in Alabama this year was Feb. 11, 2022. Twenty-two candidates are running for Alabama’s seven U.S. House districts, including 13 Republicans and eight Democrats. That’s 3.14 candidates per district, less than the 3.57 candidates per district in 2020 and 3.28 in 2018.  

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Alabama was apportioned seven districts, the same number it was apportioned after the 2010 census.
  • Six districts are currently represented by Republicans and one district—the 7th—is represented by a Democrat, Rep. Terri Sewell. This number has not changed since 2010, when Sewell was first elected. 
  • Sewell will face a general election challenger for the first time since 2012, making this year the first time in a decade that Democrats are not guaranteed to win a seat because no Republicans filed. 
  • Two districts — the 1st and the 6th — are guaranteed to Republicans since no Democrats filed for election, the highest number since 2016.
  • One district — the 5th — is open, with incumbent Rep. Mo Brooks (R) running for the U.S. Senate. Brooks was first elected in 2010, and eight candidates — two Democrats and six Republicans — are running to replace him. 
  • The eight candidates running in the 5th district are the most running for one seat this year. That’s one less than in 2020, when nine candidates — two Democrats and seven Republicans — ran for the 2nd district.
  • This year’s open seat is one more than in 2012, the previous post-redistricting election year. There were two open seats in 2020, no open seats in 2018 and 2016, and one open seat in 2014.
  • There are two contested Republican primaries this year, the lowest number since at least 2012. There are three contested Democratic primaries, one more than in 2020, but one less than in 2018. 
  • Five incumbents – four Republicans and one Democrat – will not face any primary challengers. 

Alabama and two other states — Arkansas and Georgia — are holding primary elections on May 24. A primary candidate must win a majority of the vote in order to be declared the winner in Alabama. If no candidate wins a majority of the vote, the top two finishers will advance to a June 21 runoff.

Additional reading: