CategoryState

These 10 Ohio donors gave over $3.4 million

In Ohio politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $111.4 million in total donations between Jan. 1, 2021, and June 30, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $3.4 million, or 3 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Ohio state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to campaign finance reports submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State:

Top 10 Ohio Donors (1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022)

Rank Donor Name Total Donations
1 James B Renacci $1,080,649
2 Ellen Dolores Rakowski $441,442
3 Lisa Mennet $300,000
4 Susan B and James A Haslam III $282,601
5 Dina and Ronald Wilheim $257,000
6 Richard H Rosenthal $234,113
7 Albert B Ratner $214,722
8 Gayle and Donald A Oeters $204,600
9 Geraldine B Warner $193,718
10 Jason S Lucarelli $184,104

The list of Ohio donors in this time period includes more than 1,558 individuals identified by name in the Ohio Secretary of State’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2021 Annual 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary 4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary 6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual 7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General 10/27/2022
2022 Post-General 12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These 10 Pennsylvania donors gave over $35.3 million

In Pennsylvania politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $462.2 million in total donations between Jan. 1, 2021, and June 6, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $35.3 million, or 8 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Pennsylvania state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to campaign finance reports submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State:

Top 10 Pennsylvania Donors (1/1/2021 – 6/6/2022)

Rank Donor Name Total Donations
1 Jeffrey Yass $17,520,000
2 Debra Ann and David J White $5,105,833
3 Dick Uihlien $4,250,000
4 Jason Richey $1,531,243
5 Deborah Simon $1,361,000
6 Walter W Buckley Jr $1,300,000
7 Paul J Martino $1,245,719
8 Karla T Jurvetson $1,008,192
9 William Harris $1,000,000
10 Michael Karp $1,000,000

The list of Pennsylvania donors in this time period includes more than 5,341 individuals identified by name in the Pennsylvania Department of State’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Pennsylvania PACs submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2021 Annual (C7) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C1) 4/05/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C2) 5/9/2022
2022 Post-Primary (C3) 6/20/2022
2022 Pre-General (C4) 9/22/2022
2022 Pre-General (C5) 10/31/2022
2022 Post-General (C6) 12/12/2022
2022 Annual (C7) 2/1/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These 10 Minnesota donors gave over $9.4 million

In Minnesota politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $95.9 million in total donations between Jan. 1, 2021, and July 18, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $9.4 million, or 10 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Minnesota state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to campaign finance reports submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board:

Top 10 Minnesota Donors (1/1/2021 – 7/18/2022)

Rank Donor Name Total Donations
1 J B Pritzker $2,250,000
2 Alida R Messinger $1,911,500
3 Edward W Snowdon Jr $1,050,000
4 Gideon Friedman $1,000,000
5 Stephen J Cloobeck $645,000
6 Merle Chambers $603,000
7 Vance K Opperman $585,000
8 Garrett Moran $500,000
9 Pamela S and James D Deal $475,500
10 Quinn M Delaney $400,000

The list of Minnesota donors in this time period includes more than 505 individuals identified by name in the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Minnesota PACs submitted to the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Annual 1/31/2022
2022 Q1 4/14/2022
2022 Q2 6/14/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/25/2022
2022 Q3 9/27/2022
2022 Q4 10/31/2022
2022 Jan Annual 1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



New York judge dismisses petition to compel the state’s redistricting commission to submit new congressional, legislative maps for use in 2024

Albany County Supreme Court justice Peter Lynch dismissed on Sept. 12 a petition seeking to compel the New York State Independent Redistricting Commission (IRC) to submit a second set of redistricting plans for the legislature to consider as part of redistricting after the 2020 census. Several New York state residents filed the petition.

The plaintiffs argued that “the IRC did not complete its constitutionally required redistricting duties because it failed to submit a second set of plans” and “the Court of Appeals also made clear that the Legislature was powerless to enact a new redistricting plan once the IRC refused to submit a second set of plans.” The petition sought to have the IRC meet and submit new map proposals that would be used for the 2024 elections and beyond.

Justice Lynch wrote in his order that “In this Court’s view, the Congressional maps approved by the Court on May 20, 2022, corrected by Decision and Order dated June 2, 2022, are in full force and effect, until redistricting takes place again following the 2030 federal census…In turn, there is no authority for the IRC to issue a second redistricting plan after February 28, 2022, in advance of the federal census in 2030, in the first instance, let alone to mandate such plan be prepared.”

Here is a summary of the timeline of New York’s redistricting after the 2020 census:

  • Jan. 3, 2022 – The IRC deadlocked 5-5 on two different proposed redistricting maps and submitted both proposals to the legislature.
  • Jan. 10 – The New York legislature rejected both proposals, and under the provisions of the state’s 2014 constitutional amendment adopting new redistricting procedures, the IRC had until Jan. 25 to submit a second proposal.
  • Jan. 24 – The IRC announced that it would not submit a new set of proposed maps by the deadlines.
  • Feb. 3 – The state legislature enacted its own congressional and legislative district boundaries.
  • March 31 – In response to a lawsuit, Steuben County Surrogate Court justice Patrick McAllister struck down the enacted congressional and legislative maps and ordered the state legislature to draw new maps.
  • April 27 – The New York Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, upheld McAllister’s ruling overturning the congressional and state Senate maps.
  • May 20 – Justice McAllister ordered the adoption of a new congressional map drawn by a court-appointed special master.

Justice McAllister’s March 31 order said “Part of the problem is these maps were void ab initio for failure to follow the constitutional process of having bipartisan maps presented by the [Independent Redistricting Commission]. The second problem was the Congressional that was presented was determined to be gerrymandered.” McAllister ordered the legislature to pass new maps that “receive bipartisan support among both Democrats and Republicans in both the senate and assembly.” The New York Court of Appeals’ April 27 ruling stated that the maps were enacted in violation of the state’s constitutional redistricting process and found that the congressional plan was drawn with unconstitutional partisan intent.

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Incumbent Kildee, Junge, Canny, and Goodwin running for Michigan’s 8th Congressional District

Incumbent Dan Kildee (D), Paul Junge (R), David Canny (L), and Kathy Goodwin (Working Class Party) are running in the general election for Michigan’s 8th Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

Bloomberg Government’s Emily Wilkins said, “Kildee, first elected a decade ago, is one of a handful of lawmakers who became GOP targets thanks to redistricting. His once-safe district, which includes Flint and Saginaw, became more Republican with the addition of Midland. And as one of more than two dozen endangered incumbent Democrats, the House majority will be decided in his own backyard.”

Kildee represents Michigan’s 5th Congressional District, a position to which he was first elected in 2012. Kildee has campaigned on bringing jobs back to Michigan and raising worker wages, lowering insurance premiums and the price of prescription drugs, and clean water. Kildee has referenced his record in the U.S. House, saying, “I’m focused on fighting inflation and lowering the cost of gas, groceries and prescription drugs. I’ve worked to support our local law enforcement and pass bipartisan legislation, supported by Republicans and Democrats, to reduce crime. And I’ve helped pass new laws, like the bipartisan Infrastructure Law and the CHIPS and Science Act, to support Michigan jobs and grow our economy.” In the 2020 general election, Kildee defeated Tim Kelly (R) 54.5% to 41.7%.

Junge is a former prosecutor and news anchor who worked in U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services under President Donald Trump (R). Junge has campaigned on opposing tax increases, cutting spending, banning sanctuary cities, and securing elections. Junge said, “by stopping the failed Biden-Kildee agenda and returning to the successful policies of the Trump Administration, we will strengthen our economy, lower gas prices, secure the border, and expand opportunities for every American.” In 2020, Junge ran in the general election for Michigan’s 8th Congressional District and lost to incumbent Elissa Slotkin (D) 50.9% to 47.3%.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 50.3% of the vote in this district and Trump would have received 48.2%.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of September 13, 2022, Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacancies. 



These 10 Michigan donors gave over $29.9 million

In Michigan politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $229.5 million in total donations between Jan. 1, 2021, and Aug. 22, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $29.9 million, or 13 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Michigan state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to campaign finance reports submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State:

Top 10 Michigan Donors (1/1/2021 – 8/22/2022)

Rank Donor Name Total Donations
1 Kevin Rinke $10,007,150
2 Perry Johnson $7,902,600
3 Ronald Weiser $2,912,365
4 Betsy Devos $1,968,100
5 Maria and Doug Devos $1,918,350
6 Richard M Devos Sr $1,852,050
7 Lynn Schusterman $1,261,801
8 John Kennedy III $774,490
9 Suzanne Cheryl Devos $696,050
10 Daniel Devos $647,800

The list of Michigan donors in this time period includes more than 1,426 individuals identified by name in the Michigan Secretary of State’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Annual/January 1/31/2022
2022 April (PACs) 4/25/2022
2022 July (PACs) 7/25/2022
2022 Post-Primary 9/1/2022
2022 Pre-General 10/28/2023
2022 Post-General 12/8/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These 10 Arizona donors gave over $27.3 million

In Arizona politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $162.1 million in total donations between Jan. 1, 2021, and June 30, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $27.3 million, or 17 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Arizona state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to campaign finance reports submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State:

Top 10 Arizona Donors (1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022)

Rank Donor Name Total Donations
1 Karrin Taylor Robson $15,200,440
2 Steve Gaynor $5,001,025
3 Deborah J Simon $1,507,500
4 Waseem Hamadeh $1,356,300
5 Katherine Leslie Rudin $1,000,000
6 Paola Tulliani Zen $686,675
7 David Tedesco $668,000
8 Ried G Hoffman $657,300
9 Daniel McCarthy $610,000
10 Karla T Jurvetson $577,800

The list of Arizona donors in this time period includes more than 1,062 individuals identified by name in the Arizona Secretary of State’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona PACs submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2021 1/15/2022
2022 Q1 4/15/2022
2022 Q2 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-Primary 7/23/2022
2022 Post-Primary and Q3 10/15/2022
2022 Pre-General 10/29/2022
2022 Post-General and Q4 1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These 10 California donors gave over $56.3 million

In California politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $1.5 billion in total donations between Jan. 1, 2021, and June 30, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $56.3 million, or 4 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to California state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to campaign finance reports submitted to the California Secretary of State:

Top 10 California Donors (1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022)

Rank Donor Name Total Donations
1 Joseph Sanberg $10,925,000
2 John Cox $9,620,906
3 Cari Tuna $9,500,000
4 Michael Bloomberg $8,264,662
5 Yvonne Yiu $5,623,945
6 Reed Hastings $5,557,500
7 Patty Quillin $1,797,400
8 Jim Walton $1,783,751
9 Geoffrey Palmer $1,742,600
10 Elizabeth Diane Simons $1,461,400

The list of California donors in this time period includes more than 4,125 individuals identified by name in the California Secretary of State’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active California PACs submitted to the California Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Due Date
Semiannual 1/31/2022
1st Pre-Election – Primary 4/28/2022
2nd Pre-Election – Primary 5/26/2022
Semiannual 8/1/2022
1st Pre-Election – General 9/29/2022
2nd Pre- Election – General 10/27/2022
Semiannual 1/31/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These 10 Indiana donors gave over $2.7 million

In Indiana politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $54.0 million in total donations between Jan. 1, 2021, and June 30, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $2.7 million, or 5 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Indiana state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to campaign finance reports submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State:

Top 10 Indiana Donors (1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022)

Rank Donor Name Total Donations
1 Reed Hastings $700,000
2 Jim Walton $425,000
3 Woodrow A Myers $398,143
4 Lawrence H Garatoni $260,500
5 Maci and Eric Doden $209,210
6 Deborah J Simon $152,500
7 Brenda Doden $150,500
8 Robert Lauter $150,000
9 Daryle L Doden $150,000
10 Payroll Deduction $140,101

The list of Indiana donors in this time period includes more than 456 individuals identified by name in the Indiana Secretary of State’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Indiana PACs submitted to the Indiana Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/19/2022
2022 Statewide Quarterly/Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-Election 10/17/2022
2022 Statewide Quarterly 11/1/2022
2022 Annual Report 1/18/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



54.07% of state legislatures are Republican, 44.33% Democratic in August 2022

Image of donkey and elephant to symbolize the Democratic and Republican parties.

At the end of August 2022, 54.07% of all state legislators in the United States are Republicans while 44.33% are Democrats. There are 7,383 state legislative seats in the country.

Republicans control 62 chambers, while Democrats hold 36. The Alaska House of Representatives is the only chamber organized under a multipartisan, power-sharing coalition.

Democrats hold 864 state Senate seats and 2,409 state House seats, gaining one Senate seat and losing two House seats since last month. Republicans hold 1,092 state Senate seats and 2,900 state House seats, losing one Senate seat and four House seats since last month.

Independent or third-party legislators hold 40 seats across 19 different states, including 33 state House seats and seven state Senate seats. There are 69 vacant state House seats and nine vacant state Senate seats across 32 different states.

Compared to August 2021, Democrats have gained one state Senate seat (863 v. 864) and lost 30 state House seats (2,439 v. 2,409). Republicans have gained one state Senate seat (1,091 v. 1,092) and lost 15 state House seats (2,915 v. 2,900). 

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