CategoryState

The top fundraisers in the Texas State Senate

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Texas State Senate, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the State Senate submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2022, and June 30, 2022.

Top fundraisers in the Texas State Senate by party

The top fundraisers in Texas State Senate elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Morgan LaMantia (District 27) – $554,010
  • Sarah Eckhardt (District 14) – $182,226
  • Judith Zaffirini (District 21) – $167,361
  • Gwenn Burud (District 9) – $152,699
  • Sara Stapleton-Barrera (District 27) – $146,783

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Dawn Buckingham – $1,542,046
  • Peter P. Flores (District 24) – $1,320,797
  • Mayes Middleton (District 11) – $479,935
  • Donna Campbell (District 25) – $469,865
  • Kevin Sparks (District 31) – $437,011

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $2.3 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $8.4 million. Combined, all State Senate fundraisers in the Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022, filing period raised $10.7 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 52 percent of all Democratic State Senate fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 51 percent of all Republican State Senate fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top 10 fundraisers during this period.

TOP 10 FUNDRAISERS – TEXAS STATE SENATE (Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022)
Name Party Affiliation Raised Spent
Dawn Buckingham Republican Party $1,542,046 $3,065,708
Peter P. Flores Republican Party $1,320,797 $1,547,632
Morgan LaMantia Democratic Party $554,010 $3,580,439
Mayes Middleton Republican Party $479,935 $1,878,654
Donna Campbell Republican Party $469,865 $604,528
Kevin Sparks Republican Party $437,011 $981,882
Tan Parker Republican Party $400,941 $992,605
Ellen Troxclair Republican Party $392,776 $801,291
Raul Reyes Jr. Republican Party $384,644 $537,760
Phil King Republican Party $376,988 $1,194,633

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days) 2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff 5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days) 10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days) 10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data 1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



The top fundraisers in the Texas House

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Texas House of Representatives, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the House submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2022, and June 30, 2022.

Top fundraisers in the Texas House of Representatives by party

The top fundraisers in Texas House of Representatives elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Jolanda Jones (District 147) – $245,432
  • Ann Johnson (District 134) – $239,229
  • Richard Raymond (District 42) – $233,215
  • Danielle Keys Bess (District 147) – $176,028
  • Venton Jones (District 100) – $174,416

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Dade Phelan (District 21) – $3,600,356
  • Stephanie Klick (District 91) – $1,616,488
  • Glenn Rogers (District 60) – $1,245,624
  • Carl Tepper (District 84) – $1,191,540
  • Kyle Kacal (District 12) – $946,160

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $6.7 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $34.1 million. Combined, all House fundraisers in the Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022, filing period raised $40.8 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 16 percent of all Democratic House fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 25 percent of all Republican House fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top 10 fundraisers during this period.

TOP 10 FUNDRAISERS – TEXAS HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022)
Name Party Affiliation Raised Spent
Dade Phelan Republican Party $3,600,356 $3,670,185
Stephanie Klick Republican Party $1,616,488 $961,019
Glenn Rogers Republican Party $1,245,624 $907,617
Carl Tepper Republican Party $1,191,540 $133,503
Kyle Kacal Republican Party $946,160 $872,885
Ryan Guillen Republican Party $843,817 $978,092
Barron Casteel Republican Party $728,119 $669,260
Terri Leo-Wilson Republican Party $710,044 $255,610
Reggie Smith Republican Party $657,629 $395,370
Laura Hill Republican Party $637,531 $393,851

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days) 2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff 5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days) 10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days) 10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data 1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



The top fundraisers among Texas statewide elected offices

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers among Texas statewide officeholders and candidates, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for statewide elected offices submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2022, and June 30, 2022.

Statewide political positions are typically offices in the executive and judicial branches of government rather than the legislative, and they most often represent all citizens in the state, rather than those in a particular district.

Top Texas statewide fundraisers by party

The top fundraisers among Texas statewide officeholders and candidates are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable. If no office is indicated, the person was an incumbent and was not on the ballot in 2022.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Beto O’Rourke (Governor) – $31,844,328
  • Jay Kleberg (Land Commissioner) – $1,434,388
  • Mike Collier (Lieutenant Governor) – $1,358,190
  • Rochelle Garza (Attorney General) – $971,981
  • Joe Jaworski (Attorney General) – $593,236

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Greg Abbott (Governor) – $30,018,811
  • Dan Patrick (Lieutenant Governor) – $6,252,091
  • Eva Guzman (Attorney General) – $4,223,448
  • George P. Bush (Attorney General) – $4,189,399
  • Donald Huffines (Governor) – $4,110,817

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $37.2 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $60.6 million. Combined, all statewide officeholders and candidates in the Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022, filing period raised $97.9 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 97 percent of all Democratic statewide officeholder and candidate fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 81 percent of all Republican statewide officeholder and candidate fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top 10 fundraisers during this period.

TOP 10 FUNDRAISERS – Texas STATEWIDE OFFICEHOLDERS AND CANDIDATES (Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022)
Name Party Affiliation Office Sought Raised Spent
Beto O’Rourke Democratic Party Governor $31,844,328 $12,154,146
Governor Greg Abbott Republican Party Governor $30,018,811 $49,608,521
Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick Republican Party Lieutenant Governor $6,252,091 $4,500,420
Eva Guzman Republican Party Attorney General $4,223,448 $3,677,443
Natural Resources Commissioner George P. Bush Republican Party Attorney General $4,189,399 $7,355,794
Donald Huffines Republican Party Governor $4,110,817 $13,126,027
Attorney General Ken Paxton Republican Party Attorney General $3,580,265 $7,626,255
Sarah Stogner Republican Party Railroad Commission $2,000,124
Dawn Buckingham Republican Party Land Commissioner $1,542,046 $3,065,708
Jay Kleberg Democratic Party Land Commissioner $1,434,388 $1,436,124

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days) 2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff 5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days) 10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days) 10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data 1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



The top fundraisers in the Wisconsin State Senate

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Wisconsin State Senate, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the State Senate submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2022, and June 30, 2022.

Top fundraisers in the Wisconsin State Senate by party

The top fundraisers in Wisconsin State Senate elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Jeff Smith (District 31) – $131,774
  • Kelly Westlund (District 25) – $87,849
  • Kristin Alfheim (District 19) – $51,958
  • Mark Spreitzer (District 15) – $51,763
  • Dianne Hesselbein (District 27) – $46,389

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Roger Roth – $253,294
  • Brian Westrate (District 23) – $144,057
  • Patrick Testin – $135,668
  • Rachael Cabral-Guevara (District 19) – $125,802
  • Devin LeMahieu (District 9) – $73,804

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $485,289 in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $1.4 million. Combined, all State Senate fundraisers in the Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022, filing period raised $1.9 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 76 percent of all Democratic State Senate fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 53 percent of all Republican State Senate fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top 10 fundraisers during this period.

TOP 10 FUNDRAISERS – WISCONSIN STATE SENATE (Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022)
Name Party Affiliation Raised Spent
Roger Roth Republican Party $253,294 $99,242
Brian Westrate Republican Party $144,057 $20,068
Patrick Testin Republican Party $135,668 $165,280
Jeff Smith Democratic Party $131,774 $29,175
Rachael Cabral-Guevara Republican Party $125,802 $33,466
Kelly Westlund Democratic Party $87,849 $18,187
Devin LeMahieu Republican Party $73,804 $117,258
Howard Marklein Republican Party $71,641 $22,624
Brent Jacobson Republican Party $65,654 $60,158
Romaine Quinn Republican Party $59,657 $17,752

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary 2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election 3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary 8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data 9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General 10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual 1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



The top fundraisers in the Wisconsin House

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Wisconsin House of Representatives, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the House submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2022, and June 30, 2022.

Top fundraisers in the Wisconsin House of Representatives by party

The top fundraisers in Wisconsin House of Representatives elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Steve Doyle (District 94) – $547,972
  • Katrina Shankland (District 71) – $248,451
  • Sara Rodriguez – $231,208
  • Mark Spreitzer – $51,763
  • Dianne Hesselbein – $46,389

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Timothy Ramthun – $172,628
  • Rachael Cabral-Guevara – $125,802
  • Amy Loudenbeck – $98,012
  • Robin Vos (District 63) – $85,669
  • Tyler August (District 32) – $65,508

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $1.7 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $1.4 million. Combined, all House fundraisers in the Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022, filing period raised $3.2 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 64 percent of all Democratic House fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 39 percent of all Republican House fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top 10 fundraisers during this period.

TOP 10 FUNDRAISERS – WISCONSIN HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022)
Name Party Affiliation Raised Spent
Steve Doyle Democratic Party $547,972 $79,925
Katrina Shankland Democratic Party $248,451 $13,057
Sara Rodriguez Democratic Party $231,208 $103,867
Timothy Ramthun Republican Party $172,628 $91,176
Rachael Cabral-Guevara Republican Party $125,802 $33,466
Amy Loudenbeck Republican Party $98,012 $81,769
Robin Vos Republican Party $85,669 $54,469
Tyler August Republican Party $65,508 $14,464
Mark Born Republican Party $59,181 $31,863
Mark Spreitzer Democratic Party $51,763 $10,820

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary 2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election 3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary 8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data 9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General 10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual 1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



The top fundraisers among Wisconsin statewide elected offices

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers among Wisconsin statewide officeholders and candidates, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for statewide elected offices submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2022, and June 30, 2022.

Statewide political positions are typically offices in the executive and judicial branches of government rather than the legislative, and they most often represent all citizens in the state, rather than those in a particular district.

Top Wisconsin statewide fundraisers by party

The top fundraisers among Wisconsin statewide officeholders and candidates are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable. If no office is indicated, the person was an incumbent and was not on the ballot in 2022.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Tony Evers (Governor) – $10,129,841
  • Josh Kaul (Attorney General) – $1,195,694
  • Gillian Battino (Treasurer) – $259,931
  • Sara Rodriguez (Lieutenant Governor) – $231,208
  • Angelito Tenorio (Treasurer) – $36,716

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Tim Michels (Governor) – $7,976,022
  • Rebecca Kleefisch (Governor) – $3,677,425
  • Adam Jarchow (Attorney General) – $447,622
  • Kevin Nicholson (Governor) – $446,506
  • Roger Roth (Lieutenant Governor) – $253,294

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $11.9 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $13.6 million. Combined, all statewide officeholders and candidates in the Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022, filing period raised $25.5 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 99 percent of all Democratic statewide officeholder and candidate fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 94 percent of all Republican statewide officeholder and candidate fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top 10 fundraisers during this period.

TOP 10 FUNDRAISERS – Wisconsin STATEWIDE OFFICEHOLDERS AND CANDIDATES (Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022)
Name Party Affiliation Office Sought Raised Spent
Governor Tony Evers Democratic Party Governor $10,129,841 $12,949,791
Tim Michels Republican Party Governor $7,976,022 $7,654,260
Rebecca Kleefisch Republican Party Governor $3,677,425 $3,535,775
Attorney General Josh Kaul Democratic Party Attorney General $1,195,694 $356,464
Adam Jarchow Republican Party Attorney General $447,622 $243,533
Kevin Nicholson Republican Party Governor $446,506 $341,191
Gillian Battino Democratic Party Treasurer $259,931 $55,443
Roger Roth Republican Party Lieutenant Governor $253,294 $99,242
Sara Rodriguez Democratic Party Lieutenant Governor $231,208 $103,867
Timothy Ramthun Republican Party Governor $172,628 $91,176

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Primary 2/7/2022
2022 Spring Pre-Election 3/28/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Fall Pre-Primary 8/1/2022
2022 Sept Data 9/27/2022
2022 Fall Pre-General 10/31/2022
2023 Jan Semiannual 1/7/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Signature verification deadline for Missouri marijuana legalization initiative is August 9

In Missouri, there are two citizen-initiated measures pending signature verification. One would legalize marijuana in the state. The other proposal would enact an electoral system combining top-four primaries and ranked-choice voting for general elections. The state must verify whether enough signatures have been collected by August 9.

The marijuana initiative would legalize the purchase, sale, manufacturing,  possession, and consumption of marijuana for persons 21 years old or older; allow individuals convicted of non-violent marijuana-related offenses to petition to be released from incarceration or have their records expunged; and enact a 6% tax on the sale of marijuana.

Legal Missouri, the campaign behind the electoral system initiative, reported submitting about 385,000 signatures on May 8. In Missouri, there is no statewide signature requirement; rather, proponents of initiated constitutional amendments need to collect signatures equal to 8 percent of the votes cast in the previous gubernatorial election in six of the eight state congressional districts. The smallest possible number of signatures required for an initiated amendment is 171,592.

Source: Ballotpedia

According to the Missouri Independent, Legal Missouri had enough valid signatures in four congressional districts but not others. The campaign needed to collect enough valid signatures in at least six congressional districts. Campaign director John Payne said the unofficial counts were being double-checked for errors. “As we continue to see more signature counts submitted by counties, it’s become crystal clear that we have more than enough signatures to qualify our citizens’ initiative for the November general election ballot,” said Payne. 

Missouri is one of 16 states with a signature distribution requirement for citizen-initiated measures. Of those 16, Missouri is one of five states where the distribution requirement is based on congressional districts. The other 10 states with an initiative or referendum process do not have distribution requirements.

If neither of the two initiatives pending signature verification make the ballot, 2022 would be the first even-numbered year since 1986 to feature no citizen-initiated ballot measures.



FEC data shows Schmitt leading in fundraising, Hartzler in spending in Missouri’s Republican U.S. Senate primary

Based on figures released this month by the Federal Election Commission, five candidates in the Republican primary for U.S. Senate in Missouri have raised at least $1 million. Their fundraising totals were as follows:

Among these five candidates, four spent at least $1 million: Hartzler ($2.98 million), Schmitt ($2.62 million), Greitens ($1.85 million), and McCloskey ($1.07 million). Schatz spent $975,350.

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt (R), who was first elected in 2010, announced on March 8, 2021, that he would not seek election to a third term in 2022. Blunt has not made an endorsement in this race so far.

As of July 17, The Cook Political Report and Inside Elections both rated the general election as Solid Republican, while Larry J. Sabato’s Crystal Ball rated it Likely Republican. In the 2016 general election, Blunt defeated Jason Kander (D) 49%-46%. In the 2020 general election, former President Donald Trump won the state by 15 percentage points.



Signature verification deadline for Missouri top-four ranked-choice voting initiative is August 9

In Missouri, there are two citizen-initiated measures pending signature verification. One would enact an electoral system combining top-four primaries and ranked-choice voting for general elections. The other proposal would legalize marijuana in the state. The state must verify whether enough signatures have been collected by August 9.

The electoral system initiative would replace partisan primaries with open top-four primaries for state executive, state legislative, and congressional offices. The ballot initiative would establish ranked-choice voting, also known as instant-runoff voting, for general elections, in which voters can rank the four candidates that succeeded from the primaries. The system would be similar to Alaska’s, where voters approved an initiative in 2020. 

Better Elections, the campaign behind the electoral system initiative, reported submitting more than 300,000 signatures on May 8. In Missouri, there is no statewide signature requirement; rather, proponents of initiated constitutional amendments need to collect signatures equal to 8 percent of the votes cast in the previous gubernatorial election in six of the eight state congressional districts. The smallest possible number of signatures required for an initiated amendment is 171,592.

Source: Ballotpedia

In June, Better Elections spokesman Scott Charton said, “There may not be sufficient signatures under Missouri law to give voters a chance to say yes to the Better Elections Amendment. The final counts from counties are still coming in, and we’re watching them closely.” Sean Nicholson, the campaign manager, said the signature issue was “a catastrophic failure on the part of Fieldworks,” the firm that Better Elections hired to organize a signature drive. Nicholson said the COVID-19 pandemic and a large number of signatures from unregistered people were some of the biggest obstacles. Fieldworks also addressed the issue, saying, “We share our client’s frustration. Signature gathering campaigns have faced unprecedented challenges in the last two years everywhere in the country. Our industry is not immune from the current workforce conditions.”

Missouri is one of 16 states with a signature distribution requirement for citizen-initiated measures. Of those 16, Missouri is one of five states where the distribution requirement is based on congressional districts. The other 10 states with an initiative or referendum process do not have distribution requirements.

If neither of the two initiatives pending signature verification make the ballot, 2022 would be the first even-numbered year since 1986 to feature no citizen-initiated ballot measures.



Missouri’s average gas price falls to $3.90

As of July 29, Missouri’s average gas price according to AAA was $3.90 for regular gas, which was below the national average of $4.26. Gas prices fell from the previous week’s average of $4.10 and were below the June average of $4.58. On July 29, 2021, the state’s average price was $2.85.

Joplin was the metro area in the state with the lowest average price at $3.65. Jefferson City was the metro area in the state with the highest average price at $4.03.

Missouri has a gas tax of $0.1742 cents per gallon, making it the fourth-lowest in the United States. The lowest is Alaska ($0.0895) and the highest is Pennsylvania ($0.586). The average across the country is $0.2885.

The price of gasoline is affected by several factors. Gas prices are primarily driven by crude oil prices, which are in turn affected by supply and demand, financial markets, international politics, environmental regulation, taxes, weather, and other factors. When the supply of oil increases due to increased production, the price will likely decrease. When demand increases—either from individual consumers or oil-dependent industries—the price will likely increase. Production may increase or decrease depending on advances in technology, changes in industry regulation, policy changes, political forces, and more.