CategoryState

Campaign finance update: Top fundraisers in Virginia

Campaign finance requirements govern the raising and spending of money for political campaigns. While not the only factor in an election’s outcome, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages, such as the ability to boost name recognition and promote a message. In addition, fundraising can indicate enthusiasm for candidates and parties.

This article lists the top individual fundraisers in Virginia by their party affiliation as well as the top ten fundraisers overall. It is based on campaign finance reports that active Virginia candidate political action committees (candidate PACs) submitted to the Virginia Department of Elections. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2021, and June 30, 2021. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs.

Top Virginia Fundraisers

The top fundraisers in Virginia elections are shown below. For the purpose of this article, fundraisers may include individuals who are on the ballot this election cycle as well as those not currently running for office but who have received contributions during this reporting period. Individuals are listed with the office that they held at the time of publication, if applicable.

In the Democratic party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

In the Republican party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

Fundraising Totals

Overall, the top Virginia Democratic candidate PACs raised $23.43 million in this period. The top Republican candidate PACs raised $12.22 million. Virginia candidate PACs in the Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021, filing period raised a total of $67.51 million. Combined, these Virginia candidates account for 53% of total fundraising.

Contributions to the top five Democratic candidates made up 54% of the total amount reported by their party’s campaigns. Contributions to the top five Republican fundraisers comprised 59% of the total amount reported by Republican campaigns.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers. For more information on fundraising and spending for Virginia races on the 2022 ballot, click here.

NameParty AffiliationRaised this periodSpent this period
Terry McAuliffeDemocratic Party$14,533,842$10,861,811
Glenn YoungkinRepublican Party$7,559,517$16,651,994
Jennifer D. Carroll FoyDemocratic Party$3,165,715$4,038,851
Mark HerringDemocratic Party$2,470,520$2,240,487
Jennifer McClellanDemocratic Party$1,900,651$1,592,850
Pete SnyderRepublican Party$1,836,891$7,423,876
S. RasoulDemocratic Party$1,363,459$1,836,946
Jerrauld JonesDemocratic Party$1,303,124$1,942,452
Hala AyalaDemocratic Party$1,142,895$847,828
Kirk CoxRepublican Party$1,093,890$1,725,601

Campaign Finance Reporting Periods

The reports filed with the Virginia Department of Elections cover Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021. Candidate PACs in Virginia must file semiannual financial reports of their fundraising and campaign spending. During election years, candidate PACs also file additional financial reports before primary and general elections.

The next semiannual campaign finance reporting deadline for Virginia legislators and candidates will include activity between July 1, 2021, and Dec. 31, 2021.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Campaign finance update: Top fundraisers in Wisconsin

Campaign finance requirements govern the raising and spending of money for political campaigns. While not the only factor in an election’s outcome, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages, such as the ability to boost name recognition and promote a message. In addition, fundraising can indicate enthusiasm for candidates and parties.

This article lists the top individual fundraisers in Wisconsin by their party affiliation as well as the top ten fundraisers overall. It is based on campaign finance reports that active Wisconsin candidate political action committees (candidate PACs) submitted to the Wisconsin Ethics Commission. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2021, and June 30, 2021. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs.

Top Wisconsin Fundraisers

The top fundraisers in Wisconsin elections are shown below. For the purpose of this article, fundraisers may include individuals who are on the ballot this election cycle as well as those not currently running for office but who have received contributions during this reporting period. Individuals are listed with the office that they held at the time of publication, if applicable.

In the Democratic party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

In the Republican party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

Fundraising Totals

Overall, the top Wisconsin Democratic candidate PACs raised $5.72 million in this period. The top Republican candidate PACs raised $752,716. Wisconsin candidate PACs in the Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021, filing period raised a total of $12.04 million. Combined, these Wisconsin candidates account for 54% of total fundraising.

Contributions to the top five Democratic candidates made up 93% of the total amount reported by their party’s campaigns. Contributions to the top five Republican fundraisers comprised 45% of the total amount reported by Republican campaigns.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers. For more information on fundraising and spending for Wisconsin races on the 2022 ballot, click here.

NameParty AffiliationRaised this periodSpent this period
Tony EversDemocratic Party$5,015,693$1,081,156
Jill UnderlyNonpartisan$1,501,254$1,510,522
Jeffrey DavisNonpartisan$1,039,463$1,146,602
Josh KaulDemocratic Party$410,924$107,816
Shelley GroganNonpartisan$381,467$361,231
Ryan OwensRepublican Party$308,741$59,125
John JaglerRepublican Party$197,432$225,493
Deborah KerrNonpartisan$190,451$249,548
Melissa WinkerDemocratic Party$154,692$122,731
Andrew ChristensonNonpartisan$150,684$155,434

Campaign Finance Reporting Periods

The reports filed with the Wisconsin Ethics Commission cover Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021. Candidate PACs in Wisconsin must file semiannual financial reports of their fundraising and campaign spending. During election years, candidate PACs also file additional financial reports before primary and general elections.

The next semiannual campaign finance reporting deadline for Wisconsin legislators and candidates will include activity between July 1, 2021, and Dec. 31, 2021.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Campaign finance update: Top fundraisers in Florida

Campaign finance requirements govern the raising and spending of money for political campaigns. While not the only factor in an election’s outcome, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages, such as the ability to boost name recognition and promote a message. In addition, fundraising can indicate enthusiasm for candidates and parties.

This article lists the top individual fundraisers in Florida by their party affiliation as well as the top ten fundraisers overall. It is based on campaign finance reports that active Florida candidate political action committees (candidate PACs) submitted to the Florida Department of State. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2021, and June 30, 2021. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs.

Top Florida Fundraisers

The top fundraisers in Florida elections are shown below. For the purpose of this article, fundraisers may include individuals who are on the ballot this election cycle as well as those not currently running for office but who have received contributions during this reporting period. Individuals are listed with the office that they held at the time of publication, if applicable.

In the Democratic party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

In the Republican party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

Fundraising Totals

Overall, the top Florida Democratic candidate PACs raised $2.76 million in this period. The top Republican candidate PACs raised $39.02 million. Florida candidate PACs in the Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021, filing period raised a total of $50.26 million. Combined, these Florida candidates account for 83% of total fundraising.

Contributions to the top five Democratic candidates made up 71% of the total amount reported by their party’s campaigns. Contributions to the top five Republican fundraisers comprised 89% of the total amount reported by Republican campaigns.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers. For more information on fundraising and spending for Florida races on the 2022 ballot, click here.

NameParty AffiliationRaised this periodSpent this period
Ron DeSantisRepublican Party$36,189,181$574,541
Charlie CristDemocratic Party$1,951,182$243,704
Ashley B. MoodyRepublican Party$1,400,130$54,496
Jason FischerRepublican Party$933,759$76,716
Nikki FriedDemocratic Party$398,817$30,099
Colleen BurtonRepublican Party$279,575$83,435
Milton HirschNonpartisan$260,153$6,878
Joshua MizeNonpartisan$233,334$2,075
Ed HooperRepublican Party$221,350$39,016
Hillary CasselDemocratic Party$215,680$33,563

Campaign Finance Reporting Periods

The reports filed with the Florida Department of State cover Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021. Candidate PACs in Florida must file semiannual financial reports of their fundraising and campaign spending. During election years, candidate PACs also file additional financial reports before primary and general elections.

The next semiannual campaign finance reporting deadline for Florida legislators and candidates will include activity between July 1, 2021, and Dec. 31, 2021.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Campaign finance update: Top fundraisers in Arizona

Campaign finance requirements govern the raising and spending of money for political campaigns. While not the only factor in an election’s outcome, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages, such as the ability to boost name recognition and promote a message. In addition, fundraising can indicate enthusiasm for candidates and parties.

This article lists the top individual fundraisers in Arizona by their party affiliation. It is based on campaign finance reports that active Arizona candidate political action committees (candidate PACs) submitted to the Arizona Secretary of State. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2021, and June 30, 2021. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs.

Top Arizona Fundraisers

The top fundraisers in Arizona elections are shown below. For the purpose of this article, fundraisers may include individuals who are on the ballot this election cycle as well as those not currently running for office but who have received contributions during this reporting period. Individuals are listed with the office that they held at the time of publication, if applicable.

In the Democratic party, the only fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

In the Republican party, the only fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

Fundraising Totals

Overall, the top Arizona Democratic candidate PACs raised $81,413 in this period. The top Republican candidate PACs raised $272,505. Arizona candidate PACs in the Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021, filing period raised a total of $356,927. Combined, these Arizona candidates account for 99% of total fundraising.

Contributions to the top two Democratic candidates made up 100% of the total amount reported by their party’s campaigns. Contributions to the top four Republican fundraisers comprised 100% of the total amount reported by Republican campaigns.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top seven fundraisers. For more information on fundraising and spending for Arizona races on the 2022 ballot, click here.

NameParty AffiliationRaised this periodSpent this period
Karen FannRepublican Party$254,105$233,637
Katie HobbsDemocratic Party$76,888$0
Mark FinchemRepublican Party$9,550$10,845
Michelle Ugenti-RitaRepublican Party$5,450$1,238
Robert MezaDemocratic Party$4,525$0
John KavanaghRepublican Party$3,400$1,965
Steve RemusOther$3,009$3,009

Campaign Finance Reporting Periods

The reports filed with the Arizona Secretary of State cover Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021. Candidate PACs in Arizona must file semiannual financial reports of their fundraising and campaign spending. During election years, candidate PACs also file additional financial reports before primary and general elections.

The next semiannual campaign finance reporting deadline for Arizona legislators and candidates will include activity between July 1, 2021, and Dec. 31, 2021.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Roxane Prettyman (D) sworn in to Maryland House of Delegates

Roxane Prettyman (D) was sworn in to the Maryland House of Delegates to represent District 44A on Aug. 23. Governor Larry Hogan (R) appointed Prettyman on Aug. 17 to replace Keith Haynes (D).

Previously, Prettyman worked as a paralegal specialist for the U.S. Social Security Administration. She retired from that position in 2018. She also served as a member of the Baltimore City Democratic State Central Committee.

Prettyman will serve the remainder of Haynes’ term, which was set to expire in January 2023.

So far in 2021, there have been 88 state legislative vacancies in 37 states. Three of those vacancies occurred in Maryland.

Additional reading:



Three Kentucky state legislative special elections added

Three new state legislative special elections have been added to our list. The special elections are for the District 22 seat in the Kentucky State Senate and the District 51 and 89 seats in the Kentucky House of Representatives. There are no primaries, and candidates will be chosen by party county executive committees.

Additional reading:



Major party competition reaches a decade-high in the 2021 state legislative elections

The percentage of state legislative seats being contested by both major parties in 2021 is higher than at any point in the past decade, according to a Ballotpedia analysis of candidate filings. Of the 220 seats up for election in New Jersey and Virginia, 93% are set to feature a Democrat versus a Republican on the general election ballot this November. Of the remaining 15 seats, ten will likely be won by Democrats since they have no Republican competitors and five will likely be won by Republicans.

This is the first state legislative election cycle since at least 2010 where more than 90% of state legislative seats up for election nationwide were contested by both major parties. This increase in major party competition was largely driven by an increased level of competitiveness in the Virginia House of Delegates over the past decade. 

In 2011, less than half of the seats in the chamber were contested by both major parties. In 2021, 93% of seats featured major party competition, an increase of 52 percentage points over the decade. The chamber began trending more competitive in 2017 when Democrats contested 57% more seats than they had in 2015. Both parties continued to increase their numbers of contested seats in 2019 and 2021.

By comparison, state legislative elections in New Jersey have tended to feature higher levels of major party competition throughout the decade. At least 90% of seats have been contested by both major parties in each election cycle from 2011 to 2021 in both the Senate and General Assembly.

In the Senate, which saw its decade-high number of uncontested seats in 2021, the rate of major party competition remained above 92%.

In the General Assembly, Democrats have contested every seat since 2017. The highest number of uncontested seats in the chamber came in 2015 when eight seats, or 10%, were effectively guaranteed to one of the two major parties.

Major party competition refers to the percentage of state legislative seats where voters have the ability to choose between one of the two major parties: Democrats or Republicans. These figures are subject to change ahead of the November general elections as candidates of either party may still drop out. Ballotpedia will continue to provide updates throughout the election cycle.

Major party competition is one component of Ballotpedia’s annual state legislative competitiveness study, which also includes analyses of incumbents in contested primaries and open seats.

Additional reading:



Illinois Redistricting Update: Special session to be held on Aug. 31, motion for summary judgment filed

Photo of the Illinois State Capitol building

The Illinois House and Senate Redistricting Committees will hold special sessions on Aug. 31 to “amend the legislative map enacted in June to incorporate the latest Census data.” Lawmakers are holding public hearings ahead of the special session from Aug. 26-29.

The special session is coming after the release of 2020 census data on Aug. 12, and Illinois Senate and House minority leaders McConchie (R) and Durkin’s (R) motion filed Aug. 19 for summary judgment in the consolidated redistricting lawsuit, Contreras et. al. v. Illinois State Board of Elections. The motion argued that the maps signed by Gov. Pritzker (D) on June 4 are unconstitutional because they exceed the maximum 10% deviation permitted, with “29.88% [deviation] for House Districts and 20.25% for Senate Districts.”

Contreras et. al. v. Illinois Board of Elections was consolidated on July 14, from two separate lawsuits filed in June: one by minority leaders McConchie and Durkin on the 9th, and the other by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) on behalf of five registered voters (Contreras, Fuentes, Martinez, Padilla, and Torres).

Plaintiffs alleged that the new district maps did not have substantially equal populations because they relied on data from the American Community Survey.

The Illinois State Board of Elections and the offices of House Speaker Welch (D) and Senate President Harmon (D) filed a motion to dismiss on July 16, alleging the plaintiffs lacked standing and that until the Census Bureau released full data, there was no way to measure the validity of the plaintiffs’ equal protection arguments. On July 28, MALDEF attorneys filed an amended complaint, alleging that because Contreras, Fuentes, Martinez, Padilla, and Torres lived in the allegedly malapportioned districts, the maps would dilute their votes in future elections. As of Aug. 27, litigation on the case is ongoing. A trial was tentatively set for Sept. 27-29.

Additional reading:



Voter registration and write-in candidate deadlines approach in Newsom recall

August 30 is the deadline for California residents to register to vote in order to participate in the recall election of Gov. Gavin Newsom (D). Voters must postmark or deliver their ballot to a county elections office by that date. Newly registered voters may either participate in in-person early voting in specific counties or request a mail ballot.

Additionally, August 31 is the filing deadline for write-in candidates to run in the recall election. While voters may write in any person on the ballot, only write-in votes for candidates who have filed this paperwork will count in the final results. The secretary of state’s office is expected to publish a list of these write-in candidates on September 3.

The recall election will take place on September 14. The recall election will present voters with two questions. The first will ask whether Newsom should be recalled from the office of governor. The second will ask who should succeed Newsom if he is recalled. A majority vote is required on the first question for the governor to be recalled. The candidate with the most votes on the second question would win the election, no majority required.

Forty-six candidates, including nine Democrats and 24 Republicans, are running in the election. The candidates to receive the most media attention and perform best in polls so far are YouTuber Kevin Paffrath (D), 2018 gubernatorial candidate John Cox (R), radio host Larry Elder (R), former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer (R), California State Board of Equalization member Ted Gaines (R), former Olympian and television personality Caitlyn Jenner (R), and Assemblyman Kevin Kiley (R).

Since 1911, there have been 55 attempts to recall a California governor. The only successful recall campaign was in 2003 when voters recalled then-Gov. Gray Davis (D). Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) was elected as Davis’ replacement.

Additional reading:



Christine Goodwin assumes office as Oregon state Representative

Christine Goodwin (R) assumed office as the representative for District 2 in the Oregon State House on Aug. 25. Commissioners from Douglas, Josephine, and Jackson counties appointed Goodwin to the seat on Aug. 12. The seat became vacant in July when former state Rep. Gary Leif (R) died of cancer. Goodwin will serve the remainder of Leif’s term, which was set to expire in January 2023.

At the time she was appointed, Goodwin worked as an administrator of the private optometry practice owned by her and her husband. Goodwin served as interim Douglas County Commissioner in 2018 and is a former member of the South Umpqua School Board.

Oregon is one of seven states that fill state legislative vacancies through board of county commissioners appointments. 

Additional reading: