Author

Amee LaTour

Amee LaTour is a staff writer at Ballotpedia and can be reached at amee.latour@ballotpedia.org

2,388 major party candidates filed for 2020 races, no new congressional retirements

As of January 27, 2020, 2,388 major party candidates have filed to run for the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 338 candidates are filed with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, there are 152 Democrats and 135 Republicans. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 2,292 candidates are filed with the FEC to run in 2020. Of those, there are 1,013 Democrats and 1,088 Republicans. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

No new congressional retirements were announced last week. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) and 35 representatives (26 Republicans and nine Democrats) are not running for re-election. A special election won’t be held to fill the seat vacated by Republican Duncan Hunter (CA-50) on January 13, bringing the total of open-seat House elections in 2020 to 36.

In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, where all seats are up for election, Democrats currently hold a majority with 232 seats.

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2,271 major party candidates have filed for 2020 congressional races, one more open-seat congressional race

As of January 13, 2020, 2,271 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 329 candidates are filed with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 281—148 Democrats and 133 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 2,165 candidates are filed with the FEC to run in 2020. Of those, 1,990—974 Democrats and 1,016 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

While no new congressional retirements were announced last week, Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter (CA-50) announced his resignation effective Jan. 13, and Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) announced he would not call a special election to fill the seat. This brings the total of open-seat congressional elections to 36.

Not including those who left office early, four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) and 35 representatives (26 Republicans and nine Democrats) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, where all seats are up for election, Democrats currently hold a majority with 232 seats.

Additional Reading:
United States House of Representatives elections, 2020
United States Senate elections, 2020
List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2020

 



One congressional retirement announced last week; 2,241 major party candidates have filed for 2020 races

On January 3, U.S. Rep. Phil Roe (R-Tenn.) announced he will not seek re-election. Roe has represented Tennessee’s 1st Congressional District since 2009. To date, four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) and 35 representatives (26 Republicans and nine Democrats) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—37 Republicans and 18 Democrats—did not seek re-election.

As of January 6, 2020, 2,241 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 327 candidates are filed with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 279—147 Democrats and 132 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 2,128 candidates are filed with the FEC to run in 2020. Of those, 1,962—959 Democrats and 1,003 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, where all seats are up for election, Democrats currently hold a majority with 232 seats.

Additional Reading:

United States Senate elections, 2020
United States House of Representatives elections, 2020
List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2020

 



Rep. Phil Roe (R-Tenn.) announces 2020 retirement from U.S. House

U.S. Rep. Phil Roe (R-Tenn.) announced on January 3, 2020, that he will not seek re-election to the U.S. House. He said in a statement, “As someone who practiced medicine for over 30 years, I said I would serve five or six terms because I never intended this job to be a second career.”

Roe was first elected to represent Tennessee’s 1st Congressional District in 2008. He was the 26th Republican member of the U.S. House to announce he would not seek re-election in 2020. Nine Democratic representatives have announced they will not seek re-election.

In the 2018 election cycle, 52 members of the U.S. House—34 Republicans and 18 Democrats—did not seek re-election.

Currently, Democrats hold a 232-198 majority in the U.S. House with one independent member of the chamber. In November 2020, all 435 seats will be up for election.

Click here to learn more.

Additional Reading:
List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2020
United States House of Representatives elections, 2020

 



2,164 major party candidates filed for 2020 races, no congressional retirements in last week

As of December 30, 2019, 2,164 major party candidates have filed with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) to run for the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 319 candidates are filed to run for Senate. Of those, 272—143 Democrats and 129 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 2,028 candidates are filed with the FEC to run in 2020. Of those, 1,892—935 Democrats and 957 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

There were no retirement announcements from members of Congress in the past week. To date, four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) and 34 representatives (25 Republicans and nine Democrats) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, where all seats are up for election, Democrats currently hold a majority with 233 seats.

Additional Reading:
United States Senate elections, 2020
United States House of Representatives election, 2020
List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2020



Two 2020 congressional retirements announced last week; 2,149 major party candidates filed for 2020 races

Two U.S. representatives announced last week they will not seek re-election to the U.S. House: Republican Reps. Mark Meadows (NC-11) and Mark Walker (NC-06). That brings the number of Republicans retiring from the House to 25. To date, four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) and 34 Representatives (25 Republicans and nine Democrats) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

 

As of December 23, 2019, 318 candidates are filed with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate in 2020. Of those, 271—143 Democrats and 128 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

 

For U.S. House, 2,010 candidates are filed with the FEC to run in 2020. Of those, 1,878—928 Democrats and 950 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

 

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, where all seats are up for election, Democrats currently hold a majority with 233 seats.

 

Additional Reading:

 



U.S. Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) won’t seek re-election in 2020

Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) announced on December 19, 2019, that he would not seek re-election to the U.S. House in 2020.

Meadows was first elected to the House representing North Carolina’s 11th District in 2012. He was the 25th Republican member of the U.S. House to announce he would not seek re-election in 2020. He is also the third representative from North Carolina to announce his retirement. Republican Reps. George Holding and Mark Walker announced retirements earlier this month. The state has 13 representatives in the House.

Nine Democratic representatives have announced they will not seek re-election.

In the 2018 election cycle, 52 members of the U.S. House—18 Democrats and 34 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

Currently, Democrats hold a 233-197 majority in the U.S. House with one independent member of the chamber. In November 2020, all 435 seats will be up for election.

Click here to learn more.

Additional Reading:

List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2020.

United States House of Representatives elections, 2020.



Four partisan changes in 31 big-city mayoral elections in 2019

Thirty-one mayoral elections in the 100 largest cities were held in 2019. Four partisan changes took place. Democrats gained three mayorships, two from Republicans and one from an independent. Republicans won one seat held by an unaffiliated mayor. In 20 of the 31 cities, the incumbent was

Democratic at the start of 2019. Six incumbents were Republican, three were independent, one was unaffiliated, and the affiliation of one was unknown.

The following shows the change from the pre-election incumbent’s affiliation to the 2019 winner’s affiliation for the four races in which a change occurred.
  • Phoenix, Arizona: Republican to Democratic
  • Raleigh, North Carolina: Independent to Democratic
  • Wichita, Kansas: Republican to Democratic
  • Aurora, Colorado: Unaffiliated to Republican

In most of the nation’s largest cities, mayoral elections are officially nonpartisan, though many officeholders and candidates are affiliated with political parties. We determine affiliation through direct communication with the officeholder, current or previous candidacy for partisan office, and/or identification of partisan affiliation by multiple media outlets.

Democratic mayors oversaw 67 of the 100 largest cities at the beginning of 2016, 64 at the beginning of 2017, 63 at the start of 2018, and 61 at the start of 2019. At the end of 2019, there are 63 Democratic mayors to 30 Republican mayors (Wichita’s 2019 Democratic winner won’t be sworn in until January). Three mayors are independent and four are nonpartisan.

Visit our page on municipal partisanship for more information on the 31 mayoral elections that took place in the 100 largest cities in 2019, details about the partisan changes that occurred, summaries of battleground mayoral elections, and a look at the history and debate surrounding local nonpartisan elections.

Click here to read more.

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U.S. Rep Ted Yoho (R-Fla.) won’t seek re-election in 2020

Rep. Ted Yoho (R-Fla.) announced on December 10, 2019, that he would not seek re-election to the U.S. House in 2020. Yoho said he had pledged to serve no more than four terms.
Yoho was first elected to the U.S. House representing Florida’s 3rd District in 2012. He was the 23rd Republican member of the U.S. House to announce he would not seek re-election in 2020. Nine Democratic representatives had announced they would not seek re-election. In the 2018 election cycle, 52 members of the U.S. House—18 Democrats and 34 Republicans—did not seek re-election.
Currently, Democrats hold a 233-197 majority in the U.S. House with one independent member of the chamber. In November 2020, all 435 seats will be up for election.
Click here to learn more.


Rep. George Holding (R-N.C.) announces 2020 retirement

Rep. George Holding (R-N.C.) announced that he would not seek re-election to the U.S. House in 2020. In a statement, Holding said that “the newly redrawn Congressional Districts were part of the reason I have decided not to seek reelection. But, in addition, this is also a good time for me to step back and reflect on all that I have learned.” Holding also said he hopes to return to public office someday.
On December 2, 2019, a three-judge panel of North Carolina’s superior court ruled that U.S. House elections in 2020 will take place under a remedial district map approved by state legislators in November. The court previously ruled that the original map constituted a partisan gerrymander. Following the December ruling, The Cook Political Report changed its 2020 race rating for North Carolina’s 2nd Congressional District from “Lean R” to “Likely D.”
Holding was first elected to the U.S. House representing the 2nd District in 2012. He was the 22nd Republican member of the U.S. House to announce he would not seek re-election in 2020. Nine Democratic representatives had announced they would not seek re-election. In the 2018 election cycle, 52 members of the U.S. House—18 Democrats and 34 Republicans—did not seek re-election.
Currently, Democrats hold a 233-197 majority in the U.S. House with one independent member of the chamber. In November 2020, all 435 seats will be up for election.
Click here to learn more.
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