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Amee LaTour

Amee LaTour is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

McGrath wins Democratic primary for U.S. Senate in Kentucky

Amy McGrath won the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate in Kentucky and will face Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R) in the Nov. 3 general election.

With 99% of precincts reporting, McGrath had 45% of the vote to state Rep. Charles Booker’s 43%. Eight other candidates were on the ballot. The race was called Tuesday, a week following the election, as counties finished counting absentee ballots.

McGrath had raised $41 million as of June 3—more than any other U.S. Senate candidate nationally. The Senate candidate with the second-highest total was McConnell with $33 million. Two other Senate candidates nationally had raised more than $20 million; Mark Kelly (D-Ariz.) with $31 million and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) with $21 million.

Among McGrath’s Democratic primary opponents, Charles Booker raised the second-highest amount of $793,000.

McGrath describes herself as progressive on some issues and conservative on others. She supports improving the Affordable Care Act and gradually increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Booker ran as a progressive, backing Medicare for All, an immediate minimum wage increase to $15 an hour, and a universal basic income.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, VoteVets, and more than a dozen unions were among McGrath’s endorsers. Booker’s endorsers included Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), the Working Families Party, and the Sunrise Movement.

McConnell was first elected in 1984. Kentucky last elected a Democrat to the Senate in 1992.

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3,019 major party candidates filed for 2020 Congress elections

As of June 29, 3,019 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 461 candidates are filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 369—187 Democrats and 182 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 3,019 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,650—1,247 Democrats and 1,403 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

Thirty-six members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans and nine Democrats. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 233 seats.

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Candidate Madison Cawthorn’s key policy messages from his campaign

Madison Cawthorn, who defeated Lynda Bennett in North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District Republican primary runoff Tuesday, filled out Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey.

Ballotpedia asks all federal, state, and local candidates to complete a survey so voters can discover what motivates them on political and personal levels.

Select responses from Cawthorn are below, with Ballotpedia’s questions in bold.

Who are you? Tell us about yourself.

“Madison Cawthorn is an 8th generation resident of North Carolina’s 11th district. His ancestors date back all the way to the Revolutionary war. Madison was nominated to the U.S. Naval Academy in 2014. Unfortunately, his plans were derailed after he nearly died in a tragic automobile accident that left him partially paralyzed and in a wheelchair. Madisons accident built his faith, made him a fighter, helped him appreciate everyday, and inspired him to help everyone he encounters overcome whatever adversity they face in their daily lives.”

What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

“Supporting our American values of faith, family, and freedom and combating the rise of socialist sentiment in our culture.”

Cawthorn heads to the general election for a chance to replace former incumbent Mark Meadows (R), who did not seek re-election and resigned in March to become White House chief of staff. Heading into the runoff, the race was rated Safe/Solid Republican.

In 2018, 1,957 candidates completed a Candidate Connection survey. This number represents 6.9% of all 28,315 candidates Ballotpedia covered during that cycle. Out of the 1,957 respondents, 477 (24.4%) won their elections. To read more about Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey or if you are a candidate who would like to submit a survey, click here.

Visit Cawthorn’s profile on Ballotpedia to read all of his responses.

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Cawthorn defeats Bennett in NC-11 Republican primary runoff

Madison Cawthorn defeated Lynda Bennett in North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District Republican primary runoff Tuesday. With 60% of precincts reporting, Cawthorn had received 66% of the vote to Bennett’s 34%.
Former incumbent Mark Meadows (R) did not seek re-election and left office early to serve as White House chief of staff. Meadows, along with President Donald Trump, endorsed Bennett in the race. Cawthorn was endorsed by several former primary candidates, local sheriffs, and the Protect Freedom PAC.
Cawthorn described Bennett as the candidate picked by Washington D.C. insiders and said he could bring young people into the Republican Party. Cawthorn is 24 years old. He owns a real estate investment company and is a motivational speaker. He was paralyzed in a car accident at age 19.
Bennett emphasized her decades of experience in business. She owns a real estate company and served as vice chairwoman of the Haywood County Republican Party.
Bennett received 22.7% of the March 3 primary vote to Cawthorn’s 20.4%. Twelve candidates ran. The Mountaineer’s Kyle Perotti reported that “much of the territory Cawthorn claimed was only brought into the district after a three-judge panel approved the new Congressional district in December of last year.”


2,989 major party candidates filed for 2020 Congress elections

As of June 22, 2,989 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 453 candidates are filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 362—185 Democrats and 177 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 2,974 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,627—1,238 Democrats and 1,389 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

Thirty-six members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans and nine Democrats. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 233 seats.

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2,972 major party candidates have filed for the 2020 Congress elections

As of June 15, 2,972 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 448 candidates are filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 360—184 Democrats and 176 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 2,952 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,612—1,232 Democrats and 1,380 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

Thirty-six members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans and nine Democrats. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 233 seats.

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Ossoff wins Senate primary in Georgia outright

Jon Ossoff won the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate in Georgia outright on June 9, having received more than 50% of the vote. The Associated Press called the race on June 10 as votes continued to be counted.

With 95% of precincts reporting, Ossoff received 51.1% of votes. Teresa Tomlinson was second with 15%, and Sarah Riggs Amico received 12.6%. Seven candidates ran in the primary.

Ossoff worked as an investigative journalist and ran in the 2017 special election for Georgia’s 6th Congressional District—the most expensive House race in history as of the 2020 primary. Ossoff says he has experience fighting corruption and that “we’re building a movement to mount an all-out attack on corruption in Washington.”

Tomlinson, former mayor of Columbus, Georgia, said she was the only candidate “who’s ever won an election, and I’m the only one who’s ever served in elected office,” saying that experience was needed to defeat incumbent David Perdue (R). Tomlinson said, “From the beginning, this battle has been Ossoff’s 2017 national fundraising network vs. our ‘For Georgians, by Georgians’ campaign.”

Perdue was elected in 2014 with 53% of the vote to Democrat Michelle Nunn’s 45%. Three election forecasters rate the general election Lean or Likely Republican.


2,946 major party candidates filed for 2020 Congress elections

As of June 8, 2,946 major party candidates have filed to run for the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 442 candidates are filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 355—180 Democrats and 175 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 240 Republicans and 137 Democrats.

For U.S. House, 2,923 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,591—1,369 Republicans and 1,222 Democrats—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

Thirty-six members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans and nine Democrats. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 233 seats.

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2,910 major party candidates filed for 2020 Congress elections

As of June 1, 2,910 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 441 candidates are filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 355—180 Democrats and 175 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 2,882 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,555—1,206 Democrats and 1,349 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

Thirty-six members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans and nine Democrats. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 233 seats.

Additional Reading:



2,898 major party candidates filed for 2020 Congress elections

As of May 25, 2,898 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 433 candidates are filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 351—177 Democrats and 174 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 2,866 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,547—1,201 Democrats and 1,346 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

Thirty-six members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans and nine Democrats. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 233 seats.

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