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Amee LaTour

Amee LaTour is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Former U.S. Sen. Kassebaum (R) endorses Bollier (D) in KS race

Former U.S. Sen. Nancy Kassebaum (R) endorsed Barbara Bollier (D) in the Senate race in Kansas. Kassebaum held the seat from 1978 until 1997. Pat Roberts (R), the retiring incumbent in 2020, succeeded her. Bollier, Roger Marshall (R), and Jason Buckley (L) are on the ballot.

Bollier, a state senator, served in the state House and Senate as a Republican until switching her affiliation to Democrat in December 2018. She cited school funding and Medicaid expansion among the issues influencing her switch. Bollier has endorsements from several current and former Republican state legislators.

Marshall has served in the U.S. House since 2017. Roberts and President Donald Trump (R) endorsed him. Sheila Frahm (R), who was appointed to the state’s other U.S. Senate seat in 1996 and lost that year’s primary to Sam Brownback, endorsed Marshall the same day Kassebaum endorsed Bollier.

The Wichita Eagle’s Jonathan Shorman wrote, “Both Frahm and Kassebaum hail from an era of moderate Republicanism in Kansas. … Both Frahm and Kassebaum endorsed Democrat Laura Kelly in the 2018 governor’s race.”

Kansas has not elected a Democratic senator since 1932. No Democrat appeared on the 2014 general election ballot, and Roberts won re-election with 53% of the vote to independent Greg Orman’s 43%. In the 2018 gubernatorial race, Kelly defeated Kris Kobach (R) 48% to 43%. Marshall defeated Kobach and nine others in the 2020 Republican primary.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan control of the U.S. Senate. Thirty-five of the 100 seats will be up for election, including two special elections. As of September 2020, the Republican Party has a 53-seat majority in the chamber. Democrats have 45 seats. Independents who caucus with the Democrats hold the two remaining seats. Republicans face greater partisan risk in the general election, as they are defending 23 seats while Democrats are defending 12. Both parties have two incumbents representing states the opposite party’s presidential nominee won in 2016.

Additional reading:
U.S. Senate delegation from Kansas



Major party candidates for Congress elections, 2016-2020

As of September 10, 2020, 3,169 major party candidates filed to run for U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives.

For U.S. Senate, 519 candidates filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC). Of those, 402—199 Democrats and 203 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties.

• In 2018, 529 candidates filed to run for Senate, including 138 Democrats and 241 Republicans.

• In 2016, 474 candidates ran, including 133 Democrats and 175 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 3,263 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,767—1,291 Democrats and 1,476 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties.

• In 2018, 3,242 candidates filed to run for House, including 1,576 Democrats and 1,149 Republicans.

• In 2016, 2,430 candidates ran, including 898 Democrats and 1,025 Republicans.

Thirty-seven members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans, nine Democrats, and one Libertarian. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election.

• In 2018, 55 members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

• In 2016, 45 members of Congress—19 Democrats and 26 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 232 seats.

Additional reading


Mowers wins Republican primary in New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District

Matt Mowers won the five-candidate Republican primary in New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District. With 38% of precincts reporting, Mowers had received 61% of the vote and Matt Mayberry was second with 27%.

Mowers has worked as the executive director of the New Hampshire Republican State Committee, an official in the 2016 Trump presidential campaign, and a senior White House advisor in the State Department. He received endorsements from President Donald Trump (R) and U.S. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.).

Mayberry is an Air Force veteran and businessman. He was endorsed by U.S. Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.) and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R).

Incumbent Chris Pappas (D) was first elected in 2018, defeating Eddie Edwards (R) 54% to 45%. Pappas is seeking re-election and was unopposed in the Democratic primary. The 1st District changed party hands five times between 2006 and 2016.



Messner wins Republican Senate primary in New Hampshire

Bryant “Corky” Messner won the Republican primary for U.S. Senate in New Hampshire. With 66% of precincts reporting, he had received 50% of the vote to Don Bolduc’s 43%. Two others ran.

President Donald Trump (R) and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) endorsed Messner in the primary. Bolduc had endorsements from Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Rep. Michael Waltz (R-Fla.).

Incumbent Jeanne Shaheen (D) is seeking re-election and won the Democratic primary. She was first elected in 2008 and won re-election in 2014 with 51.5% of the vote to Scott Brown’s (R) 48.2%.



3,169 major party candidates filed for 2020 Congress elections

As of September 7, 3,169 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 519 candidates are filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 402—199 Democrats and 203 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 3,263 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,767—1,291 Democrats and 1,476 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

Thirty-seven members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans, nine Democrats, and one Libertarian. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 232 seats.

Additional reading:


Congressional retirements by month, 2011-2020 — a Ballotpedia analysis

Between 2011 and July 2020, Ballotpedia tracked 243 retirement announcements from members of the U.S. House and Senate. January saw the highest number of retirement announcements of any month at 45—31 during even-number years and 14 during odd-number years, when no regular congressional elections are held.

February and November had the second-highest total announcements at 27 each. Sixteen February announcements occurred during an election year and 11 during an off year. Most November announcements—24—took place during off years. The three November election year announcements were for the following election cycle.

The fewest retirements—eight—were announced in June. Six of those occurred during odd-number years. August and October saw the second-fewest announcements at 11 each. All of those except for one announcement occurred during off years.

As of August 26, 41 members of Congress—four U.S. senators and 37 U.S. representatives—are not running for re-election in 2020 (not including incumbents who resigned or otherwise left office early). In 2018, 55 members didn’t seek re-election. Forty-five members retired in 2016. In 2014, 48 members retired. And in 2012, 50 members retired.

See our analysis for numbers of announcements by month and year, as well as a data table that includes each officeholder who announced a retirement, their party, the announcement date, and more.


3,160 major party candidates filed for 2020 Congress elections

As of August 24, 3,160 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 515 candidates are filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 402—200 Democrats and 202 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 3,242 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,758—1,287 Democrats and 1,471 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

Thirty-seven members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans, nine Democrats, and one Libertarian. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 232 seats.

Additional reading:


3,141 major party candidates filed for 2020 Congress elections

As of August 17, 3,141 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 505 candidates are filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 395—198 Democrats and 197 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 3,178 candidates have filed with the FEC to run. Of those, 2,746—1,280 Democrats and 1,466 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

Thirty-seven members of the U.S. House are not seeking re-election in 2020. That includes 27 Republicans, nine Democrats, and one Libertarian. Four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, Democrats currently hold a majority with 232 seats.

Additional reading:


Previewing Florida’s 15th Congressional District Republican primary

Incumbent Rep. Ross Spano faces Scott Franklin in Florida’s 15th Congressional District Republican primary on August 18.

Spano’s campaign website says he “continues to fight for families and small businesses in Washington, looking for ways to reduce burdensome regulations on small businesses and allowing them to invest, grow and create jobs.”  Franklin, who serves on the Lakeland City Commission, said he would advance the Trump agenda and “earn back the trust, respect and integrity the people of Central Florida deserve.”

Spano’s endorsers include Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), House Minority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.), and House Republican Conference Chair Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.). Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) recently endorsed Franklin.

The Federal Election Commission received complaints that Spano had loaned his 2018 campaign $167,000 that he borrowed from friends, in violation of contribution limits. In November 2019, the Justice Department and House Ethics Committee began federal probes into the alleged violation. On February 10, the Florida Bar announced it would also investigate. Spano said the loan likely violated campaign finance law but said it was a mistake.

Spano was first elected to the House in 2018, defeating Democrat Kristen Carlson 53% to 47%. Three election forecasters rate the general election Lean Republican.


Ilhan Omar wins MN-05 Democratic primary

Incumbent Rep. Ilhan Omar defeated four candidates in the Democratic primary for Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District. As of 9:25 p.m. Central Time, she had received 57% of the vote. Antone Melton-Meaux was second with 39%.

This was the first time in more than 85 years that an incumbent U.S. representative from Minnesota had more than three primary challengers.

Omar is among four congresswomen often referred to as the squad, along with Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.), and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.). She said her accomplishments in the House include passing more amendments than any other member of the Minnesota delegation, working to extend the Deferred Enforced Departure status for Liberians in the state, and introducing the Student Debt Cancellation Act.

Melton-Meaux, a lawyer and mediator, criticized Omar by saying she was more focused on arguments with the president and celebrity status than on the needs of the district. He said he would find common ground with others to achieve progressive goals.

As of July 22, Omar had raised $4.3 million to Melton-Meaux’s $4.2 million.

Omar won the 2018 general election by a margin of 56 percentage points. All 435 seats in the U.S. House will be up for election on November 3, 2020. As of August 2020, Democrats have a 232-198 advantage over Republicans. There is one Libertarian member, and there were four vacancies.



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