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Brittony Maag

Brittony Maag is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org

Five states to hold congressional primaries on August 4

On August 4, Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, and Washington are holding statewide primaries. Between these five states, 48 congressional seats—45 U.S. House seats and three U.S. Senate seats—are up for election.

Arizona is holding a special election to fill the Senate seat vacated by former Sen. John McCain’s (R) death on August 25, 2018. Martha McSally (R) is the current appointed incumbent, and she is running in the August 4 Republican primary. The winner of the November 3 general election will take office on January 3, 2021, and serve the remaining two years of McCain’s term. Arizona is also holding primary elections for all nine of its U.S. House seats on August 4.

Both Kansas and Michigan are holding congressional primaries for Senate and House seats. In Kansas, elections are being held for the state’s Class II Senate seat currently held by Pat Roberts (R) and all four of the state’s U.S. House seats. Michigan is holding elections for the Class II Senate seat held by Gary Peters (D) and all 14 of its House seats.

Neither Missouri nor Washington has a Senate seat up for election in 2020. Missouri is holding elections for its eight House seats, and Washington is holding elections for its 10 House seats.

The 45 House seats up for election on August 4 represent 10.3% of the 435 total seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, all of which are up for election in 2020. The three Senate seats up for election that day equal 3% of the Senate’s 100 total seats and approximately 8.6% of the 35 Senate seats up for election this year (33 are up for regular election; two are up for special election).

Candidates in all five states are competing to advance to their respective states’ general elections scheduled for November 3, 2020.

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Candidate filing deadline to run for congressional office passes in Louisiana

On July 24, 2020, the major-party filing deadline to run for elected office in Louisiana passed. The candidate filing period ran from July 22 to July 24; the Louisiana State Legislature moved the filing period from earlier in the month in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Prospective candidates filed for the following congressional offices:

U.S. Senate

Louisiana’s Class II Senate seat is up for election. Incumbent Sen. Bill Cassidy (R) filed for re-election to the seat. He was first elected in 2014.

U.S. House of Representatives
All six of Louisiana’s U.S. House seats are up for election. Republicans currently hold five of those seats and a Democrat holds the other. Five of the six incumbents filed for re-election:
  • District 1: Steve Scalise (R)
  • District 2: Cedric Richmond (D)
  • District 3: Clay Higgins (R)
  • District 4: Mike Johnson (R)
  • District 6: Garret Graves (R)

District 5 Rep. Ralph Abraham (R) is the one congressional incumbent not seeking re-election to his seat. He announced on February 26, 2020, that he would be retiring after his current term, in keeping with his decision upon his election in 2014 to serve only three terms.

Louisiana elections use the majority-vote system. All candidates compete in the same primary, and a candidate can win the election outright by receiving more than 50% of the vote. If no candidate does, the top two vote recipients from the primary advance to the general election, regardless of their partisan affiliation. The primary is scheduled for November 3, and the general election is scheduled for December 5, 2020.

Louisiana’s statewide filing deadline is the 50th and final major-party deadline to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The previous statewide filing deadline was on July 14 in Delaware.

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Filing deadline passes for state executive and legislative candidates in Delaware

On July 14, 2020, the candidate filing period ended to run for state executive and legislative offices in Delaware. Candidates filed for the following state executive offices:
• Governor
• Lieutenant Governor

• Insurance Commissioner

All three incumbents—Governor John Carney (D), Lieutenant Governor Bethany Hall-Long (D), and Insurance Commissioner Trinidad Navarro (D)—filed for re-election.

Candidates also filed for the following state legislative offices:
• Delaware State Senate (11 of 21 seats)

• Delaware House of Representatives (all 41 seats)

The primary is scheduled for September 15, 2020, and the general election will be held on November 3, 2020.

The next and final statewide filing deadline in the 2020 election cycle is on July 24 in Louisiana.

Delaware has a Democratic state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.

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Candidate filing period for congressional races to end in Delaware

The statewide filing deadline to run for elected office in Delaware is on July 14, 2020. Prospective candidates may file for the following congressional offices:

  • U.S. Senate: The Class II Senate seat held by Chris Coons (D) is up for election.
  • U.S. House: Delaware’s one at-large congressional district seat is also up for election. Lisa Blunt Rochester (D) is the incumbent.

The primary is scheduled for September 15, and the general election is scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Delaware’s statewide filing deadline is the 49th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The final statewide filing deadline is in Louisiana on July 24.

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Congressional filing period ends in Guam

On June 30, the filing deadline passed to run for U.S. Congress in Guam. The U.S. territory of Guam is represented in Congress by one at-large, non-voting member who is elected every two years. Guam’s current delegate is Michael F.Q. San Nicolas (D), who was first elected in 2018.
Rep. San Nicolas and two challengers filed for the seat. One, Robert Underwood, will be on the ballot with San Nicolas in the Democratic primary on August 29. William Castro is the other challenger, and as the only Republican in the race, he will automatically advance to the general election on November 3 and face the winner of the Democratic primary.
The origin of non-voting delegates in the U.S. House of Representatives dates back to the Continental Congress and the establishment of the Northwest Ordinance in 1787. Many territories would go on to become states, with Alaska and Hawaii being the most recent to do so in 1959. At that time, Puerto Rico was the only territory left with representation in Congress. Guam gained the right to elect a congressional delegate in 1972. Washington D.C., the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands also elect non-voting delegates to Congress.


Candidate filing period for congressional races ends in Rhode Island

On June 24, the statewide filing deadline passed to run for U.S. Congress in Rhode Island. One U.S. Senate seat and both of Rhode Island’s U.S. House seats are up for election in 2020.

U.S. Sen. Jack Reed (D) filed for re-election to his Class II Senate seat. He was first elected to the seat in 1996. On the U.S. House side, both incumbents—District 1 Rep. David Cicilline (D) and District 2 Rep. Jim Langevin (D)—filed for re-election. Cicilline was first elected to represent District 1 in 2010, and Langevin was elected to represent District 2 in 2000. The Rhode Island Secretary of State’s office is currently assessing the ballot qualifications of all filed candidates.

The primary is scheduled for September 8, and the general election is scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Rhode Island’s statewide filing deadline was the 48th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The final two statewide filing deadlines are in Delaware and Louisiana on July 14 and July 17, respectively.

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Two Massachusetts selectmen facing recall on June 27

In Kingston, Massachusetts, Selectmen Chairman Josh Warren and Selectman Elaine Fiore are facing a recall election on June 27. Both officials became the subject of a recall campaign stemming from their official response to an incident that occurred in January 2020 between another selectman and a town employee. Recall supporters, led by Kingston resident Peter Boncek, accused Warren and Fiore of nonfeasance and an inability to act in the best interests of their constituents. Warren responded that the board had launched a fact-finding inquiry into the January incident and hired an independent investigator who ultimately found both of the involved parties were at fault.

The recall effort was launched in January 2020 and petitioners successfully collected enough signatures to meet the required threshold of 20% of the town’s registered voters. On February 26, the Kingston Board of Registrars certified 2,053 signatures on Warren’s petition and 2,073 signatures on Fiore’s petition. After neither official resigned from their position, the Kingston Board of Selectman scheduled the recall election for June 27 to coincide with Kingston’s annual town elections.

In this case, the officials subject to a recall election are permitted to run in the replacement election for their seats in the event they are recalled. Both Warren and Fiore chose to run, so challenger Richard Arruda is facing Elaine Fiore in the replacement race for her seat, and challenger Kimberley Emberg is facing Joshua Warren in the replacement race for his seat.

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Candidate filing period for congressional races to end in Connecticut and New Hampshire

The statewide major-party filing deadlines to run for congressional offices in Connecticut and New Hampshire are approaching. Connecticut’s deadline is on June 11, and New Hampshire’s deadline is on June 12. Connecticut’s major-party deadline was originally scheduled for June 9, but Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont (D) issued an executive order extending it by two days in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prospective candidates in Connecticut may file for the following congressional offices:
• U.S. House (5 seats)

Prospective candidates in New Hampshire may file for the following congressional offices:
• U.S. Senate (1 seat)
• U.S. House (2 seats)

Connecticut’s primary is scheduled for August 11, and New Hampshire’s primary is scheduled for September 8. Both states’ general elections are scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Connecticut’s filing deadline is the 46th and New Hampshire’s deadline is the 47th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on June 24 in Rhode Island.

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Candidate filing period for state executive and legislative races ends in Vermont and Wyoming

The filing deadlines to run for state-level offices in Vermont and Wyoming have passed. Vermont’s deadline was on May 28, and Wyoming’s deadline was on May 29.

In Vermont, prospective candidates filed for the following state offices:
• Governor
• Lieutenant Governor
• Secretary of State
• Auditor
• Attorney General
• Treasurer
• Vermont State Senate (30 seats)
• Vermont House of Representatives (150 seats)

In Wyoming, prospective candidates filed for the following state legislative offices:
• Wyoming State Senate (15 seats)
• Wyoming House of Representatives (60 seats)

Wyoming is also holding retention elections for two state Supreme Court justices on November 3, 2020.

Vermont’s primary is scheduled for August 11, and Wyoming’s primary is scheduled for August 18. The general elections in both states are scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Vermont’s statewide filing deadline was the 39th and Wyoming’s deadline was the 40th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadlines are on June 1 in Alaska, Kansas, and Wisconsin.

Wyoming has a Republican state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers. Vermont has a divided government where no party holds a trifecta.

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Candidate filing period to run for state executive and legislative races to end in Vermont and Wyoming

 

The statewide filing deadlines to run for state-level offices in Vermont and Wyoming are approaching. Vermont’s deadline is on May 28 and Wyoming’s deadline is on May 29.

In Vermont, prospective candidates may file for the following offices:
• Governor
• Lieutenant Governor
• Secretary of State
• Auditor
• Attorney General
• Treasurer
• Vermont State Senate (30 seats)
• Vermont House of Representatives (150 seats)

In Wyoming, prospective candidates may file for the following offices:
• Wyoming State Senate (15 seats)
• Wyoming House of Representatives (60 seats)

Wyoming is also holding retention elections for two state Supreme Court justices on November 3, 2020.

Vermont’s primary is scheduled for August 11, and Wyoming’s primary is scheduled for August 18. The general elections in both states are scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Vermont’s statewide filing deadline is the 39th and Wyoming’s deadline is the 40th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadlines are on June 1 in Alaska, Kansas, and Wisconsin.

Wyoming has a Republican state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers. Vermont has a divided government where no party holds a trifecta.

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