Author

David Luchs

David Luchs is a staff writer at Ballotpedia and can be reached at david.luchs@ballotpedia.org

In the past decade, two lieutenant governors have challenged their state’s governor for re-election; two more could do so this year

Since 2010, two gubernatorial elections have featured an incumbent governor running against the state’s lieutenant governor. This year, gubernatorial elections in North Carolina and Vermont each have the potential to feature the incumbent and the state’s lieutenant governor.

Vermont Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman (Vermont Progressive Party/Democratic) announced Monday that he would run for governor this year. Incumbent Gov. Phil Scott (R) is eligible to run for re-election but has not announced whether he will do so. In North Carolina, Lt. Gov. Dan Forest (R) is challenging incumbent Gov. Roy Cooper (D). Both are running in contested primaries; Forest faces state Rep. Holly Grange (R) while Cooper faces businessman Ernest Reeves (D).

A Zuckerman-Scott or a Forest-Cooper matchup would be the first time a state’s governor faced the lieutenant governor in the general election since Ballotpedia began coverage of state executive elections in 2010. During that period, there have been two times when a state’s governor faced the lieutenant governor in a primary election.

In 2011, then-West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin’s (D) resignation prompted a special election for the remainder of Manchin’s term. Six candidates ran in the Democratic primary, including acting Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin (D) and acting Lt. Gov. Jeffrey Kessler (D). Tomblin won the primary with 40.4% of the vote and went on to win the special election in November and a full term the following year.

The other governor-lieutenant governor primary contest also involved a vacancy; after South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley (R) resigned to serve as U.S. ambassador to the U.N., Henry McMaster (R) succeeded to the governorship. In the 2018 gubernatorial election, McMaster and Lt. Gov. Kevin Bryant (R) were among the five candidates seeking the Republican nomination. McMaster won the Republican nomination after advancing to a runoff against businessman John Warren (R) and went on to win a full term in the November election.

The responsibilities and selection process for the office of lieutenant governor vary widely from state to state. In 26 states, the lieutenant governor runs on a ticket with the governor, while in 17 states the office is elected separately. Of the 17 that elect governors and lieutenant governors separately, three—Louisiana, North Carolina, and Vermont—currently have a lieutenant governor of a separate party from the governor.

Five states do not have a lieutenant governor at all. Two of them—Arizona and Oregon—currently have a governor and secretary of state (the office next in line to the governorship in both states) of different parties. The remaining two states give the title of lieutenant governor to the state senate president.

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Additional reading:
Vermont gubernatorial election, 2020
North Carolina gubernatorial election, 2020
South Carolina gubernatorial and lieutenant gubernatorial election, 2018 (June 12 Republican Primary)
West Virginia special gubernatorial election, 2011



RNC outraises DNC for seventh consecutive month; fundraising gap between major party House and Senate committees narrows

The Republican National Committee (RNC) outraised its Democratic counterpart by more than two-to-one for a seventh consecutive month, while the Democratic House committee outraised its Republican counterpart, according to December 2019 campaign finance reports filed with the FEC.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $6.2 million and spent $3.2 million last month, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $5.8 million and spent $5.8 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 8.7% more than the DSCC ($60.7 million to $55.6 million). The NRSC’s 8.7% fundraising advantage is down from 8.8% in November but up from 7.1% in October.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $9.0 million and spent $5.1 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $6.7 million and spent $5.6 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the DCCC has raised 35.5% more than the NRCC ($110.3 million to $77.1 million). The DCCC’s 35.5% fundraising advantage is down from 36.0% in November and 38.4% in October.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising, although their advantage in the House was smaller than in this cycle. The DSCC had raised 22.9% more than the NRSC ($48.5 million to $38.5 million), while the DCCC had raised 17.0% more than the NRCC ($96.0 million to $81.0 million).

Republicans continue to lead in national committee fundraising. The Republican National Committee (RNC) raised $20.6 million and spent $18.8 million while the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised $8.1 million and spent $8.4 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 88.9% more than the DNC ($214.6 million to $82.5 million). The RNC’s 88.9% fundraising advantage is down from 89.1% in November but up from 88.2% in October.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle) the RNC had a smaller 49.5% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($95.6 million to $57.9 million).

So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 34.6% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($352.4 million to $248.5 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is up from 34.2% in November and 32.7% in October.

Click here to learn more.

Additional reading:
Democratic National Committee
Republican National Committee
Fundraising in Congressional elections, 2018



Andrew Yang leads in pageviews for a second consecutive week

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.

Andrew Yang’s campaign page on Ballotpedia received 1,605 views for the week of December 22-28. Yang’s pageview figure represents 14.5% of the presidential campaign pageviews for the week. Bernie Sanders had 11.0% of the pageviews for the week, followed by Tom Steyer with 9.0%. This is Yang’s second consecutive week leading in pageviews.

Every Democratic candidate had fewer pageviews last week than the week before. The three candidates with the smallest week-over-week decreases in pageviews were Andrew Yang (-33.7%), Michael Bloomberg (-35.6%), and Bernie Sanders (-40.0%).

Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews this year with 156,561. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg with 148,465 and by Joe Biden with 139,937.

Click here for more information on pageviews and detailed lifetime stats.



Since 1776, 217 state governors have resigned their office

Since 1776, 217 state governors have resigned before completing their terms. Before serving as president, Andrew Johnson (D) resigned twice as governor of Tennessee (once in 1857 and once in 1865), so there have been 218 gubernatorial resignations.

Of the 218 resignations, more than three-quarters (166) happened because the governor was elected or appointed to another office. Thirty-seven took place for various personal reasons, such as illness or policy disputes with the state legislature. The remaining 15 resignations occurred following allegations of misconduct on the governor’s part.

Twelve governors of New Jersey have resigned, more than any other state. Governors of Maine and South Carolina follow with 10 resignations each, and then Virginia with nine. Florida, Hawaii, and Washington are the only states which have never had a governor resign.

The most recent gubernatorial resignation took place in Missouri on June 1, 2018, when Eric Greitens (R) resigned amid allegations of sexual misconduct and misuse of campaign information.

Click here to learn more about gubernatorial resignations in your state.

Additional reading:
Governor
How gubernatorial vacancies are filled
State executive offices



Andrew Yang leads in pageviews for the first time since October; Amy Klobuchar has highest week-over-week pageview jump

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.

Andrew Yang’s campaign page on Balloptedia received 2,421 views for the week of December 15-21. Yang’s pageview figure represents 11.7% of the pageviews for the week. Amy Klobuchar had 10.1% of the pageviews for the week, followed by Joe Biden with 10.0%. This is Yang’s first time leading in pageviews since the week of October 13-19.

Every Democratic candidate other than Julián Castro had more pageviews last week than the week before. The three candidates with the greatest week-over-week increases were Amy Klobuchar (81.1%), Andrew Yang (40.0%), and Tom Steyer (34.1%).

Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews this year with 154,956. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg with 147,578 and Joe Biden with 138,970.

For more information on pageviews and detailed lifetime stats, click here:
Presidential campaign pageviews on Ballotpedia, 2020



Tom Steyer leads in pageviews for a second consecutive week

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.
Tom Steyer’s campaign page on Ballotpedia received 3,282 views for the week of December 1-7. Steyer’s pageview figure represents 9.1% of the pageviews for the week. Andrew Yang had 8.8% of the pageviews for the week, followed by Pete Buttigieg with 8.5%. This is Steyer’s second consecutive week leading in pageviews.
Every Democratic candidate other than Steyer, Buttigieg, and Tulsi Gabbard had more pageviews last week than the week before. The three candidates with the greatest week-over-week increases were Julián Castro (52.8%), Bernie Sanders (40.5%), and Joe Biden (37.5%).
Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews this year with 150,806. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg with 144,572 and Joe Biden with 134,882.
For more information on pageviews and detailed lifetime stats, click here.


Previewing the 2020 gubernatorial elections: a look back at the most recent election by state

Eleven states are holding elections for governor in 2020, including seven of the 26 states with Republican governors and four of the 24 states with Democratic governors. New Hampshire and Vermont last elected a governor in 2018, while the other nine last held a gubernatorial election in 2016.
Here’s what happened in the most recent gubernatorial election in each state:
  • In Delaware’s 2016 election, Rep. John Carney Jr. (D) defeated state Sen. Colin Bonini (R) by a margin of 19.2 percentage points. Incumbent Jack Markell (D) was term-limited. Carney’s margin of victory was the smallest in Delaware gubernatorial elections since 2004.
  • In Indiana’s 2016 election, Lieutenant Governor Eric Holcomb (R) defeated former state House Speaker John Gregg (D) by a 6.0 percent margin. Holcomb replaced incumbent Mike Pence (R) on the ticket after he dropped out in July to serve as Donald Trump’s running mate. Holcomb expanded on Pence’s margin of 2.9 percentage points in 2012 when Pence also ran against Gregg.
  • In Missouri, nonprofit executive Eric Greitens (R) defeated state Attorney General Chris Koster (D) by a 5.9 percent margin. This was the widest margin of victory for a Republican governor of Missouri since 1988. Greitens’ win gave the Republican party control of the governorship—and a trifecta in Missouri—for the first time since 2008.
  • In Montana, incumbent Steve Bullock (D) defeated businessman Greg Gianforte (R) by a 3.9 percent margin. Bullock expanded on his margin from 2012 when he won by 1.6 percentage points. It was the fourth consecutive Democratic victory in a Montana gubernatorial election.
  • In the 2018 New Hampshire gubernatorial election, incumbent Chris Sununu defeated former state Sen. Molly Kelly (D) by a 7.0 percent margin. Sununu expanded on his 2.3 percent margin in 2016, when he became the first Republican to win election as governor of New Hampshire since 2002.
  • North Carolina’s 2016 gubernatorial election was the closest of the year. State Attorney General Roy Cooper (D) defeated incumbent Pat McCrory (R) by a margin of 0.2 percentage points. McCrory was the first governor in North Carolina history to lose re-election.
  • In North Dakota, businessman Doug Burgum (R) defeated state Rep. Marvin Nelson (D) by a 57.1 percent margin. Incumbent Jack Dalrymple (R) did not run for re-election. It was the seventh consecutive Republican win in a North Dakota gubernatorial election.
  • In Utah, incumbent Gary Herbert (R) defeated businessman Mike Weinholtz (D) by a 38.1 percent margin. This was Republicans’ tenth consecutive win in a Utah gubernatorial election. The longest current winning streak by a single party in gubernatorial elections is 11 elections, set by Oregon Democrats in 2018. Utah Republicans will match this streak if they win the 2020 election.
  • In Vermont’s 2018 gubernatorial election, incumbent Phil Scott (R) defeated businesswoman Christine Hallquist (D) by a 14.9 percent margin. Scott was first elected in 2016 by an 8.8 percent margin.
  • In Washington, incumbent Jay Inslee (D) defeated Seattle port commissioner Bill Bryant (R) by an 8.8 percent margin. This was the tenth consecutive win for a Democratic candidate for governor of Washington and the widest margin of victory there since 2000.
  • In West Virginia, businessman Jim Justice (D) defeated state Senate President Bill Cole (R) by a margin of 6.8 percent. Incumbent Earl Ray Tomblin (D) was term-limited. Justice, who joined the Republican Party in 2017, was the fifth consecutive Democrat to win a West Virginia gubernatorial election.

Click here to learn more.

Additional reading:


Tom Steyer leads in pageviews for the first time this year

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.
 
Tom Steyer’s campaign page on Ballotpedia received 4,081 views for the week of November 24-30. Steyer’s pageview figure represents 11.8% of the pageviews for the week. Pete Buttigieg had 9.9% of the pageviews for the week, followed by Andrew Yang with 8.6%. The previous week, Buttigieg had the most pageviews, followed by Tulsi Gabbard, then Steyer. This is Tom Steyer’s first week this year leading in pageviews.
 
Every Democratic candidate other than Steyer had fewer pageviews last week than the week before. Steyer’s pageviews increased by 22% while all other Democrats had a decrease between 11% and 37%.
 
Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews this year with 147,622. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg with 141,510 and Joe Biden with 131,910.
 


Pete Buttigieg leads in pageviews for the first time since June, Williamson is seventh Democratic candidate to reach 100,000 pageviews

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.
 
Pete Buttigieg’s campaign page on Ballotpedia received 4,382 views for the week of November 17-23. Buttigieg’s pageview figure represents 10.3% of the pageviews for the week. Tulsi Gabbard had 8.4% of the pageviews for the week, followed by Tom Steyer with 7.9%. None of the three were among the top three Democrats for pageviews the week before. This is Buttigieg’s first time leading in pageviews since the week of June 9-15.
 
Every Democratic candidate had at least 19% more pageviews last week than the week before. The three candidates with the largest increases in pageviews were Deval Patrick (293%), Tulsi Gabbard (194%), and Amy Klobuchar (121%).
 
Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews this year with 144,654. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg with 138,084 and Joe Biden with 129,749. Marianne Williamson had 1,786 pageviews last week, bringing her total for the year to 100,048. Williamson is the seventh Democratic candidate to reach 100,000 pageviews.
 
For more information on pageviews and detailed lifetime stats, click the linke below.


RNC outraises DNC by more than two-to-one for a sixth consecutive month, Democrats retain House committee fundraising lead

The Republican National Committee (RNC) has outraised its Democratic counterpart by more than two-to-one for a sixth consecutive month, while the Democratic House committee outraised its Republican counterpart, according to November 2019 campaign finance reports filed with the FEC Wednesday.
 
The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $6.7 million and spent $4.8 million last month, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $5.4 million and spent $5.6 million. In the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 8.8% more than the DSCC ($54.4 million to $49.8 million). The NRSC’s 8.8% fundraising advantage is up from 7.1% in October but down from 12.3% in September.
 
On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $12.2 million and spent $4.8 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $10.0 million and spent $5.6 million. In the 2020 cycle, the DCCC has raised 36.0% more than the NRCC ($101.3 million to $70.4 million). The DCCC’s 36.0% fundraising advantage is down from 38.4% in October and 36.6% in September.
 
At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising, although their advantage in the House was smaller than in this cycle. The DSCC had raised 19.7% more than the NRSC ($44.4 million to $36.5 million), while the DCCC had raised 14.3% more than the NRCC ($89.1 million to $77.2 million).
 
Republicans lead in national committee fundraising. The Republican National Committee (RNC) raised $25.3 million and spent $23.1 million while the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised $9.0 million and spent $8.9 million. In the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 89.1% more than the DNC ($194.0 million to $74.5 million). The RNC’s 89.1% fundraising advantage is up from 88.2% in October and 83.0% in September.
 
At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential election cycle) the RNC had a smaller 54.3% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($89.3 million to $51.2 million).
 
So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 34.2% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($318.8 million to $225.6 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is up from 32.7% in October and 31.5% in September.
 


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