Author

David Luchs

David Luchs is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

A look at this week’s battleground primary results

Welcome to the Thursday, May 19, Brew. 

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. A look at this week’s battleground primary results
  2. The latest on redistricting in Florida, Kansas, and New York
  3. Candidate Connections update—More from state legislative candidates in Georgia

A look at this week’s battleground primary results

Elections took place in at least eight states on Tuesday, including statewide primaries in Idaho, Kentucky, North Carolina, Oregon, and Pennsylvania. Here’s a look at some noteworthy results in battleground races:

U.S. Senate

  • Ted Budd wins GOP nomination in North Carolina: Ted Budd defeated 13 other candidates to win the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in North Carolina. Budd, a U.S. representative running with the endorsement of former President Donald Trump (R), had 59% of the vote. Pat McCrory (R), a former governor, had 25%. 
  • John Fetterman wins Democratic nomination in Pennsylvania: Lt. Gov. John Fetterman (D) beat three other candidates to win the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania. Fetterman had 59% of the vote to Conor Lamb’s (D) 26%. As of writing, the Republican primary remained too close to call, with Mehmet Oz (R) and David McCormick (R) each at 31% of the vote and within the threshold required to prompt an automatic recount. 

State executives

  • Brad Little wins re-nomination as governor of Idaho: Idaho Gov. Brad Little defeated Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin and six others to win the Republican nomination for a second term. Little had 61% of the vote to McGeachin’s 25%. On two occasions in 2021, McGeachin issued executive orders related to Idaho’s response to COVID-19 in her capacity as acting governor while Little was out of state. Both times, Little rescinded McGeachin’s order upon returning to the state.
  • Tina Kotek wins Democratic nomination for Oregon governor: Tina Kotek (D), a former speaker of the Oregon House of Representatives, defeated 14 other candidates to win the Democratic nomination for governor. She had 56% of the vote to Tobias Read’s 34%. 
  • Doug Mastriano wins Republican nomination for Pennsylvania governor: Doug Mastriano (R) defeated eight other candidates to win the Republican nomination for governor of Pennsylvania. Mastriano, a state senator running with former President Trump’s endorsement, had 42% of the vote. 

U.S. House

  • Madison Cawthorn loses re-nomination: Chuck Edwards (R) defeated seven other candidates, including incumbent Madison Cawthorn (R), to win the Republican nomination in North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District. Cawthorn, who was first elected in 2020, was endorsed by former President Donald Trump (R). Edwards had an endorsement from U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis (R). Cawthorn is the third member of the U.S. House to lose renomination this cycle, alongside Bob Gibbs (R) and David McKinley (R). As of writing, a fourth incumbent, Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.), appeared to be losing renomination to challenger Jamie McLeod-Skinner (D) 38% to 61%. At this point in the 2020 cycle, one U.S. House incumbent, Dan Lipinski (D), had lost renomination. 

State legislators

  • Eleven incumbents lose renomination: At least eleven incumbent state legislators lost primaries on Tuesday, with 92 more competing in races that are too close to call. Eight of the defeated incumbents were Republicans, including four members of the Kentucky House of Representatives, three members of the North Carolina House of Representatives, and one member of the North Carolina State Senate. The three defeated Democratic incumbents included two members of the North Carolina State Senate and one member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives.
  • This brings the total number of state legislative incumbents defeated this year to 25, with that number likely to grow. Across the nine states that have held primaries, 2.7% of incumbents running for re-election have lost.

Keep reading

The latest on redistricting in Florida, Kansas, and New York

Thirty-nine states have adopted new congressional district maps following the 2020 census. Three states’ maps have been overturned by court action and two states have yet to adopt new maps. The six remaining states were apportioned a single district, meaning no congressional redistricting was necessary. 

Here’s the latest on the court challenges to the Florida, Kansas, and New York maps: 

Florida

On May 12, Leon County Circuit Court Judge Layne Smith ruled that the congressional district boundaries that Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) signed into law on April 22 were unconstitutional. In his opinion, Smith wrote that the enacted plan “would diminish the ability of Black voters to elect their candidate of choice in North Florida,” specifically in the state’s current Fifth Congressional District.

Smith ordered Florida to use a revised congressional map for the 2022 elections that the legislature had previously proposed that restores a version of the Fifth Congressional District.

Florida was apportioned 28 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, one more than it was apportioned after the 2010 census. Candidates have until June 17 to file for Florida’s U.S. House primaries, which are scheduled to take place August 23.

Kansas

On May 18, the Kansas Supreme Court overturned a district court’s ruling that found that the state’s enacted congressional district boundaries were unconstitutional. Justice Caleb Stegall wrote for the court, “A majority of the court holds that, on the record before us, plaintiffs have not prevailed on their claims that Substitute for Senate Bill 355 violates the Kansas Constitution.”

Wyandotte County District Court Judge Bill Klapper had struck down Kansas’ enacted congressional map on April 25. 

Kansas enacted congressional district boundaries on Feb. 9 when both the state House and Senate overrode Gov. Laura Kelly’s (D) veto of a redistricting plan that the legislature passed. Across both chambers, all but one House Republican voted to override Kelly’s veto and all Democrats voted to sustain her veto.  

Kansas was apportioned four seats in the U.S. House of Representatives after the 2020 census, the same number it received after the 2010 census. The filing deadline for ballot-qualified parties in Kansas is June 1, and primaries are scheduled for Aug. 2.

New York

On May 16, court-appointed special master Jonathan Cervas released draft congressional district boundaries for New York. The New York Court of Appeals—the state’s highest court—ruled on April 27 that the state government had not followed proper constitutional procedure in enacting the maps. The court also found that the congressional plan was drawn with unconstitutional partisan intent. The special master was appointed by Steuben County Surrogate’s Court Judge Patrick McAllister, who must approve the final plan.

New York was apportioned 26 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, one less than it was apportioned after the 2010 census.

Bloomberg Government’s Keshia Clukey and Greg Giroux wrote that “Under the Cervas proposal, Democratic candidates would have an edge in 16 of 26 New York congressional districts, down from 22 Democratic-leaning seats in the version struck down as a gerrymander. Three congressional districts would be Republican leaning, and the map creates seven seats with smaller partisan divides.”

Keep reading 

Candidate Connections update—More from state legislative candidates in Georgia

Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey asks candidates for federal, state, and local office to share what motivates them on a personal and political level.

As of May 17, 2022, we’re covering 75 races with final candidate lists in which all candidates have completed the survey. Twelve races reached that milestone in the past week.

What’s new this week

Kevin Grindlay and Shawn Still are the two candidates on the ballot in the Republican primary for Georgia State Senate District 48, located northeast of Atlanta. Located northeast of Atlanta, the district’s current representative is Michelle Au (D), who is running for state House this year. In the 2020 election, Au defeated Matt Reeves (R) 56% to 44%.

Here’s how Grindlay and Still answered the question, “Who do you look up to? Whose example would you like to follow, and why?”

Grindlay: “Jesus. In terms of the political realm: Donald Trump, Steve Bannon, Marjorie Taylor Green, Matt Gaetz, etc. At the state level, Mark Finchem, Doug Mastriano, Wendy Rogers, etc.”

Still: “I look up to my uncle, Rick Still, Sen. Bruce Thompson, and GA GOP Chairman David Shafer. Throughout my life, my Mother was my hero.

A leader whose example I greatly admire is Dwight D. Eisenhower. He helped create the concept of ‘modern Republicanism’ that helped the party attract more swing voters and solidify our base. He expanded Social Security and prioritized a balanced budget over tax cuts. He put tens of thousands of soldiers returning home from war to work by creating the Interstate Highway System, the largest non-military job program in our history.”

About Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Some other details about the 75 races where all candidates have completed the survey:

  • They are located in 24 states.
  • Sixteen of the 75 races are taking place in Texas.
  • Eleven of the 75 races are general elections, including one runoff.
  • Of the 64 primaries and primary runoffs, 34 are for the Democratic nomination, 26 are for the Republican nomination, three are top-two primaries, and one is nonpartisan.
  • Twenty-five of the 75 races are for U.S. House.

Keep reading



More results from Tuesday’s primaries

Welcome to the Thursday, May 12, Brew. 

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Reviewing the results of Tuesday’s elections
  2. A look at Kentucky’s May 17 primaries
  3. Candidate Connection update—survey responses from U.S. House candidates in Pennsylvania

Reviewing the results of Tuesday’s elections

Elections for offices within Ballotpedia’s coverage scope took place in four states on Tuesday, including statewide primaries in Nebraska and West Virginia. Here’s a look at some of the noteworthy election results:

  • Nebraska State Senate primaries: Primaries were held for 24 of the 49 seats in Nebraska’s unicameral legislature. Seven of the 24 primaries remain too close to call. Of the 17 callable races, seven had an incumbent on the ballot, all of which saw the incumbent advance to the general election. State legislative elections in Nebraska are nonpartisan, meaning all candidates for a particular seat appear on the same primary ballot and the top two finishers advance to the general election.
  • West Virginia State Senate primaries: Primaries were held for 17 of the 34 seats in the West Virginia State Senate Tuesday. There were two contested Democratic primaries, including the District 1 primary, in which Randy Swartzmiller (D) defeated incumbent Owens Brown (D) 53% to 47%. Brown is the ninth incumbent state legislator to lose re-nomination in a primary this year. There were also 11 contested Republican primaries, four of which had an incumbent on the ballot. Three of those races resulted in a win for the incumbent and the fourth is too close to call.
  • West Virginia House of Delegates primaries: Primaries were held for all 100 seats in the West Virginia House of Delegates. There were 43 contested Republican primaries, 25 of which had an incumbent on the ballot. Of the 15 callable primaries with an incumbent on the ballot, one resulted in the incumbent’s defeat—the District 90 primary between incumbents George Miller and Ken Reed. Miller defeated Reed 58% to 42%. There were also 16 contested Democratic primaries, three of which had an incumbent on the ballot. The incumbent won two of those primaries, while the third, the District 27 primary between incumbents Ric Griffith and Chad Lovejoy, remains too close to call.
  • Nebraska gubernatorial Republican primary: Jim Pillen defeated Charles Herbster, Brett Lindstrom, and six other candidates to win the Republican nomination for governor of Nebraska. Pillen had 34% of the vote to Herbster’s 29% and Lindstrom’s 27%. No other candidate received more than 10% of the vote. Incumbent Pete Ricketts (R) is term-limited.
  • Nebraska Board of Education District 7 primary: Elizabeth Tegtmeier and incumbent Robin Stevens advanced from the nonpartisan primary for the District 7 seat on the Nebraska Board of Education with 62% and 20% of the vote, respectively. They will face one another in the nonpartisan general election in November.
  • West Virginia’s 2nd Congressional District Republican primary: Incumbent Alexander Mooney (R) defeated incumbent David McKinley (R) and three other candidates in the Republican primary for West Virginia’s 2nd Congressional District. Mooney had 54% of the vote to McKinley’s 36%.

Keep reading

A look at Kentucky’s May 17 primaries

Kentucky is one of five states holding statewide elections on May 17. Let’s take a look at what’s on the state’s ballot this year.

Congressional races

This year, Kentucky is holding elections for one of its two seats in the U.S. Senate and all six of its seats in the U.S. House. Six Republicans, including incumbent Rand Paul (R), and four Democrats are running for the seat. The fundraising leaders in each primary are Paul, with $20.4 million raised this cycle, and Charles Booker (D), with $3.4 million. No other candidate has reported raising more than $20,000.

All five Republicans representing Kentucky in the U.S. House are running for re-election, and all but District 1 incumbent James Comer Jr. face at least one primary challenger. The lone Democrat in the state’s congressional delegation, John Yarmuth (D), is not running for re-election. Two Democrats and seven Republicans are running to succeed Yarmuth in the 3rd district, which election forecasters rate Solid Democrat. The 3rd district is one of three in Kentucky with a contested Democratic primary this year.

State legislative races

Although Kentucky’s statewide executive offices are not up for election this year, elections are taking place for 19 of the 38 seats in the state Senate and all 100 seats in the state House. This year, 256 candidates filed for the 119 seats up; 168 Republicans and 88 Democrats. The 2.2 candidates per seat is an increase from 2.0 in 2020 but down from 2.4 in 2018. 

This year, there are 44 contested Republican primaries and 15 contested Democratic primaries between both of Kentucky’s legislative chambers. Of the 101 incumbents running for re-election, 34 face a contested primary, the largest number since at least 2014. In both 2016 and 2018, 18 incumbents faced primary challenges, while in 2020 that number was 13. 

The increased number of contested primaries is partially due to redistricting, which sometimes results in multiple incumbents being placed in the same district. This year, there are three primaries in Kentucky contested between two incumbents of the same party running in the same district, all for the state House. Two of those primaries are between two Republicans and one is between two Democrats.

Republicans have a 30-8 majority in the state Senate and a 75-25 majority in the House. Because the governor, Andy Beshear, is a Democrat, Kentucky has a divided government. The next election for governor will take place in 2023.

Keep reading 

Candidate Connection update—survey responses from U.S. House candidates in Pennsylvania

Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey asks candidates for federal, state, and local office to share what motivates them on a personal and political level.

As of May 10, 2022, we’re covering 63 races with final candidate lists in which all candidates have completed the survey. Thirteen of those races reached that milestone in the past week.

What’s new this week

This week, we’re featuring survey responses from two U.S. House primaries in Pennsylvania—one for the Democratic nomination and one for the Republican nomination.

Rick Coplen and Shamaine Daniels are the two candidates on the ballot in the Democratic primary for Pennsylvania’s 10th Congressional District. The Harrisburg-area district is currently represented by Scott Perry (R), who is unopposed in the Republican primary. Election forecasters rate this seat Safe Republican, meaning Perry is very likely to win in November. In 2020, he defeated Eugene DePasquale (D) 53% to 47%.

Here’s how Coplen and Daniels answered the question, “Who are you? Tell us about yourself.”

Rick Coplen:

“My mother and grandfather, Mexican immigrants who fought to integrate public facilities in their hometown, instilled in me the values of hard work, service, and treating everyone with dignity. My working-class upbringing took me to West Point and international duty as an active-duty military officer.

I’m a husband of nearly 35 years, father of two extraordinary adult daughters, West Point and Princeton graduate, US Army combat (82nd Airborne in Panama) and peacekeeping (Bosnia) veteran, teacher of economics and strategic leadership (Elizabethtown College, US Army War College, US Military Academy at West Point), Chair, Rotary Veterans Initiative (college scholarships for veterans), and Board member, Employment Skills Center (adult literacy and job training skills).

Additionally, I am a published author and lecturer, Past President of the Rotary Club of Carlisle (led the Central PA relief effort after Superstorm Sandy), and Team leader supporting the Secretary, Department of Homeland Security with daily briefings in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

I am running for Congress to help bring everyone the opportunity to pursue their unique American dream. We need collaborative leaders who stand up for our democracy and bring us together for the common good. I am such a leader.”

Daniels:

“Shamaine A. Daniels is a three-term Councilwoman for the City of Harrisburg where she reduced red-tape and lowered fees for opening small businesses, doubled penalties for slumlords and invested in youth programming. She has also been an educator and attorney for well over a decade. About half of her legal career was spent defending workers’ rights and civil rights and the second half of her legal career has been spent helping American citizens and immigrants navigate our complex immigration system. She has consistently served the most vulnerable populations in our Commonwealth: Victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, abandoned and neglected children, workers, seniors, individuals with disabilities.

Daniels migrated to the United States from Venezuela in her teens and received her B.A. in Political Science/International Relations and Sociology from West Chester University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. and M.A. in Women’s Studies from the University of Cincinnati and its College of Law.”

Three Republicans are on the ballot in Pennsylvania’s 17th Congressional District: Kathleen Coder, Jason Killmeyer, and Jeremy Shaffer. Located to the northwest of Pittsburgh, election forecasters rate this district a toss-up. Incumbent Conor Lamb (D) is running for U.S. Senate rather than seeking re-election, leaving the seat open.

Here’s how the three answered the question, “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”:

Kathleen Coder:

“My biggest goal is making sure the people of the 17th district are represented well in DC. I will advocate for policies that benefit the people, not the special interest groups & bureaucrats. I will fight to bring more jobs & economic growth to this district by limiting government overreach & regulation. We are a resource rich region that could be pivotal in our country’s energy independence. I am also dedicated to securing our borders, pursuing election integrity, curbing the national debt, & maintaining a strong national defense. I am pro-life & pro-2nd Amendment. I am committed to ensuring that we are governing by the Constitution & protecting our country from the socialist movement.

I, like many in our district, am sick & tired of the ineffectiveness of our current leaders in DC. They claim to represent us, but all they provide are a lot of promises & no results. That’s why, when the new congressional map encompassed the entire region I have lived & worked in for the last 15+ years, I felt called to get involved. In fact, I am the only candidate on either side of the ticket that has a proven track record of results & relationships in both Allegheny & Beaver Counties. Bottom line–I am running because I see a need, not because I want a position. Ultimately, it is my goal to represent the people of District 17 well, restore people’s trust in their public servants, & provide good leadership. Let’s get back to what matters most – pursuing common sense for the common good.”

Jason Killmeyer:

“Constitutional Conservativism.”

Jeremy Shaffer:

“Keeping our Communities Safe Defending our Freedoms Educational Opportunities World-Class Health Care Securing the Border Ensuring Election Integrity Energy Independence An Effective Foreign Policy Investing in our Infrastructure Creating Economic Opportunities”

About Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Some other details about the 63 races where all candidates have completed the survey:

  • They are located in 22 states.
  • Fourteen of the 63 races are taking place in Texas.
  • Nine of the 63 races are general elections.
  • Of the 54 primaries and runoffs, 29 are for the Democratic nomination, 22 are for the Republican nomination, two are top-two primaries, and one is nonpartisan.
  • Twenty-four of the 50 are races for U.S. House.

Keep reading



Looking back at the results of Tuesday’s battleground primaries

Welcome to the Thursday, May 5, Brew. 

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Reviewing the results of Tuesday’s battleground primaries
  2. Candidate Connection update—survey responses from state legislative candidates in Pennsylvania and Georgia
  3. President Joe Biden’s approval at 41%, congressional approval at 27%

Reviewing the results of Tuesday’s battleground primaries

Voters in seven states hit the polls on Tuesday for elections within Ballotpedia’s coverage scope. We followed nine battleground primaries in three states; here’s an update on how all nine turned out:

  1. J.D. Vance wins Ohio Senate nomination: J.D. Vance defeated six other candidates to win the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate seat in Ohio currently held by Rob Portman (R).  Vance had 31% of the vote to Josh Mandel’s 24%, Matt Dolan’s 22%, and Mike Gibbons’ 12%.  No other candidate had more than 10% of the vote.
  2. Tim Ryan wins Ohio Senate nomination: Tim Ryan defeated Morgan Harper and Traci Johnson to win the Democratic nomination for Ohio’s open U.S. Senate seat. Ryan had 73% of the vote to Harper’s 16% and Johnson’s 11%. Ryan will face J.D. Vance in the general election.
  3. Decade-high number of incumbent defeats in Indiana state legislative primaries: Six members of Indiana’s state legislature—one senator and five representatives—lost re-election to primary challengers Tuesday. This was the largest number of state legislators defeated in an Indiana primary since 2012. All six defeated incumbents were Republicans.
  4. Gov. Mike DeWine wins primary: Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) defeated three challengers in the Republican primary for governor. DeWine had 48% of the vote to Jim Renacci’s 28% and Joe Blystone’s 22%. DeWine will face former Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley (D) in the general election, which forecasters rate Likely Republican.
  5. Ohio Secretary of State wins primary: Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose (R) defeated challenger John Adams (R) 66% to 34%. LaRose will face Chelsea Clark (D) in the general election.
  6. Shontel Brown defeats primary challenger: U.S. Rep. Shontel Brown (D) defeated primary challenger Nina Turner (D). Brown had 63% of the vote to Turner’s 37%. The two were backed by different members of the national party, with Joe Biden (D) and Nancy Pelosi (D) backing Brown and Bernie Sanders (I) backing Turner. Brown and Turner both ran in a 2021 special election in the district. That year, Brown won with 50% of the vote to Turner’s 45%.
  7. Madison Gesiotto Gilbert wins U.S. House nomination: Madison Gesiotto Gilbert defeated six other candidates to win the Republican nomination for U.S. House in Ohio’s 13th Congressional District. Gilbert had 28% of the vote to Gregory Wheeler’s 24%, Janet Folger Porter’s 17%, and Shay Hawkins’ 11%. No other candidate had more than 10% of the vote. Gilbert will face Emilia Sykes (D) in the general election, which forecasters rate a toss-up.
  8. Erin Houchin wins U.S. House nomination: Erin Houchin defeated eight other candidates to win the Republican nomination for U.S. House in Indiana’s 9th Congressional District. Houchin had 37% of the vote to Mike Sodrel’s 26% and Stu Barnes-Israel’s 21%. Election forecasters rate the general election Solid Republican, meaning Houchin is likely to win.
  9. J.R. Majewski wins U.S. House nomination: J.R. Majewski defeated three other candidates to win the Republican nomination in Ohio’s 9th Congressional District. Majewski had 36% of the vote to Craig Riedel’s 31% and Theresa Gavarone’s 29%. Majewski will face incumbent Marcy Kaptur (D), first elected in 1982, in the general election, which forecasters rate a toss-up.
  10. Nashville District Attorney wins primary: Nashville District Attorney Glenn Funk (D) defeated two challengers to win re-nomination in the Democratic primary. Funk had 43% of the vote to Sara Beth Myers’ 40% and P. Danielle Nellis’ 17%. No Republican filed for the office, meaning Funk is likely to win re-election.

Keep reading

Candidate Connection update—survey responses from state legislative candidates in Pennsylvania and Georgia

Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey asks candidates for federal, state, and local office to share what motivates them on a personal and political level.

As of May 4, 2022, we’re covering 50 races with final candidate lists in which all candidates have completed the survey. Six of those races reached that milestone in the past week.

What’s new this week

This week, we’re featuring two state legislative primaries—a Republican primary in Pennsylvania and a Democratic primary in Georgia.

Eric Clancy and Thomas Kutz are the two candidates on the Republican primary ballot in Pennsylvania’s 87th state House District. Located to the west of Harrisburg, the 87th district shifted south and west following the 2020 round of redistricting. Incumbent Greg Rothman (R) is running for state senate, leaving the House seat open. In 2020, Rothman defeated Nicole Miller (D) 56% to 44% under the old district lines.

Here’s how Clancy and Kutz answered the question, “What is the first historical event that happened in your lifetime that you remember? How old were you at the time?”

Eric Clancy:

“Perhaps not the first historic event but I remember sitting in a junior high homeroom class. The teacher received the NY Times every day, he let me read it because I folded it properly when I returned it to him. I remember looking at the daily reports around the US withdrawal from Vietnam and casualty numbers. The turmoil on the front page, of domestic trouble around the US, and the ever shrinking circle of secure space in Saigon on the third page graphic was really very sad. The homeroom teacher was a veteran, a neighbor of a friend lost her son there, and my father had classmates from West Point that had been there. There was not shortage of insight and opinion but it just seemed wrong that our blood and treasure was being spent with, at that point, a feeble plan.

I grew up with complete respect for our country and this didn’t seem right, or consistent with the respect our Country was due. It was a time of real reflection. This was brought on by men, perhaps failed men, with a political focus not the spirited Country that I respected.”

Thomas Kutz:

“As a young school student, I vividly remember the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. These attacks shook America to its very core and threatened the foundation of freedom. The terrorist attacks had a profound effect on me, and it instilled in me a passion to serve my community and to ensure that the American ideal would live on despite the attacks it faces. I’m grateful for every first responder who ran towards the danger that day, and I’m grateful for every soldier who answered the call to serve in order to protect our freedoms and our way of life.”

Solomon Adesanya and Benjamin Stahl are the two candidates running in the Democratic primary for Georgia House of Representatives District 43. The district, located in between Marietta and Sandy Springs to the north of Atlanta, shifted slightly north and west following the 2020 round of redistricting.  Incumbent Sharon Cooper (R) is running for re-election in a different district, leaving this seat open. In 2020, Cooper defeated Luisa Wakeman (D) 51% to 49% under the old district lines.

Here’s how Adesanya and Stahl answered the question, “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

Solomon Adesanya:

“We’ve had the same funding formula for our public schools in Georgia for over 30 years. Georgia is one of only eight states in the U.S. that does not provide additional funding specifically to educate students living in poverty. In other states, funding reforms of the last 30 years have increased opportunities for lower-income schools and improved student achievement. My passion for quality public education is a driving force. I will fight every day to ensure all kids have a space to blossom.”

Benjamin Stahl:

“THE PROBLEMS WE FACE MAY SEEM SMALL TO OTHERS, BUT ARE CRUCIAL TO ENSURING PERSONAL SUCCESS AND GROWTH. THE CONSTITUENTS OF HD43 BELIEVE THAT LEADERSHIP ROOTED IN PRINCIPLES AND VALUES IS PARAMOUNT TO EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT GOVERNMENT.”

About Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Some other details about the 50 races where all candidates have completed the survey:

  • They are located in 21 states.
  • Fourteen of the 50 races are taking place in Texas.
  • Four of the 50 races are general elections.
  • Of the 46 primaries and runoffs, 27 are for the Democratic nomination and 19 are for the Republican nomination.
  • Twenty-one of the 50 are races for U.S. House.

Keep reading 

President Joe Biden’s approval at 41%, congressional approval at 27%

Recent approval polling averages show President Joe Biden (D) steady at 41% and congressional approval up at 27%. 

Ballotpedia’s polling index showed Biden at 41% approval and 52% disapproval as of April 30. At this time last month, his approval rating was also at 41%. The highest approval rating Biden has received is 55%, last seen on May 26, 2021, and the lowest approval rating he has received is 40%, last seen on April 18, 2022. At this point in 2018, Donald Trump’s (R) approval rating was 42%.

Congress was at 27% approval and 59% disapproval. At this time last month, its approval rating was 23%. The highest approval rating Congress has received during the Biden Administration is 36%, last seen on July 16, 2021, and the lowest approval rating it has received is 14%, last seen on Jan. 26, 2022. At this point in 2018, the congressional approval rating was 16%.

Ballotpedia’s polling index takes the average of polls conducted over the last thirty days to calculate presidential and congressional approval ratings. We average the results and show all polling results side-by-side because we believe that paints a clearer picture of public opinion than any individual poll can provide. The data is updated daily as new polling results are published.

Keep reading



84 measures certified for statewide ballots, 11 fewer than even-year average

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. 84 measures certified for statewide ballots, 11 fewer than even-year average
  2. Candidate Connection update: More from U.S. House candidates in Mississippi and North Carolina
  3. Nevada’s U.S. House races to have the fewest candidates per seat this year since at least 2018


84 measures certified for statewide ballots, 11 fewer than even-year average

Eighty-four statewide ballot measures have been certified for the ballot in 32 states so far this year, 11 less than the average number certified at this point in other even-numbered years from 2010 to 2020. 

Here’s an update on the latest ballot measure activity:

One initiative was removed from the ballot following a court ruling:

  1. Arizona Reduce Number of Income Tax Brackets to Flat Rate of 2.50% Referendum (2022)

Signatures have been submitted and are pending verification for two initiatives in California and North Dakota:

  1. California Art and Music K-12 Education Funding Initiative (2022)
  2. North Dakota Single-Subject and 60% Supermajority Approval Requirements for Constitutional Amendments Initiative (2022)

Enough signatures were verified for five initiatives in Alaska, Massachusetts, and Ohio to certify them to the legislature: 

  1. Alaska State Recognition of American Indian Tribes Initiative (2022)
  2. Massachusetts App-Based Drivers as Contractors and Labor Policies Initiative (2022)
  3. Massachusetts Changes to Alcohol Retail Licensing Initiative (2022)
  4. Massachusetts Medical Loss Ratios for Dental Insurance Plans Initiative (2022)
  5. Ohio Marijuana Legalization Initiative (2022)

From 2010 to 2020, the average number of statewide ballot measures certified in an even-numbered year was 164. By this time during even-numbered years from 2010 through 2020, an average of 94 statewide measures had been certified for the ballot. 

Keep reading 


Candidate Connection update: More from U.S. House candidates in Mississippi and North Carolina

Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey asks candidates for federal, state, and local office to share what motivates them on a personal and political level. 

As of April 26, 2022, we’re covering 44 races with final candidate lists in which all candidates have completed our survey. Twelve of those races reached that milestone in the past week.

What’s new this week

This week, we’re featuring two primaries for U.S. House—a Democratic primary in Mississippi and a Republican primary in North Carolina. 

Hunter Avery and Dianne Black are the two candidates on the Democratic primary ballot in Mississippi’s 1st Congressional District. Located in the state’s northeast corner, the 1st District leans towards Republicans, with three racetracking outlets rating the general election as Solid Republican. In 2020, incumbent Trent Kelly (R) defeated Antonia Eliason (D) 69% to 31%.

Here’s how both candidates answered the question, “Please list below 3 key messages of your campaign. What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?”

Hunter Avery:

“Everyone should be treated fairly and equally.

I proudly support everyone defending our nation and believe that even a single homeless veteran is too many.

If I am elected, I will fight against corruption no matter what side of the aisle it is coming from.”

Dianne Black:

“The American people deserve to have their tax dollars spent on stimulating our economy.

Mississippians need to be paid a living wage and have access to affordable Healthcare.

I support extending the 2021 Child Tax Credit.”

Pat Harrigan and Jonathan Simpson are the two candidates on the ballot in the Republican primary in North Carolina’s 14th Congressional District. Encompassing the southern portion of Charlotte and areas to the west, this is a new congressional district created after North Carolina gained a seat in the 2020 round of apportionment. Two Democrats and two Republicans are running.

Here’s how both candidates answered the question, “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

Pat Harrigan:

“I’m passionate about ending inflation and getting our economy back on track. That includes an aggressive approach to an all-of-the-above energy strategy that makes America energy independent.

My background as a combat veteran Green Beret gives me a unique perspective on the importance of national security, especially as it relates to the disastrous withdrawal from Afghanistan, the weakness on display in the face of Russian aggression, and other conflicts across the world. When America fails to lead, the world burns.

I’m also passionate about securing the border, dealing with our illegal immigration problem, protecting the 2nd Amendment, and election integrity.”

Jonathan Simpson:

“I am particularly passionate about education reform. I believe every parent should have the right to choose where to send their child to school and that the government education monopoly should be busted up. Education should be publicly funded, but privately operated, giving parents more choice, students better learning outcomes, teachers better pay and working environments, and the taxpayer a better return on investment. I am also passionate about the modernization of our tax scheme, compassionate immigration reform, and market-based health care reform. I am a big believer in American ingenuity, and I care deeply about investing in science, be it research for the sake of our environment, like nuclear power, or research for the sake of mankind’s common progress, like space exploration. There are no challenges that Americans cannot overcome, only opportunities that poor leadership might cause us to miss.”

About Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Some other details about the 44 races where all candidates have completed the survey:

  • They are located in 17 states.
  • Fourteen of the 44 races are taking place in Texas.
  • Four of the 44 races are general elections.
  • Of the 40 primaries and runoffs, 25 are for the Democratic nomination and 15 are for the Republican nomination.
  • Twenty of the 44 are races for U.S. House.

Keep reading 


Nevada’s U.S. House races to have the fewest candidates per seat this year since at least 2018

The filing deadline for candidates running for state or federal office in Nevada was March 18, 2022. Thirty-eight candidates are running in Nevada’s four U.S. House districts, including 21 Republicans, 12 Democrats, and five independent or third party candidates. That’s 9.5 candidates per district, less than the 10.0 candidates per district in 2020 and 10.5 candidates per district in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Nevada was apportioned four congressional seats, the same number of seats it had after the 2010 census.
  • All four incumbent representatives are running for re-election in the district they currently represent.
  • Incumbent Rep. Steven Horsford (D) in Nevada’s 4th is the only incumbent not facing a primary challenger. Uncontested primaries in Nevada are canceled, so Horsford automatically advanced to the general election.
  • The last open seat elections in Nevada took place in 2018 in Nevada’s 3rd and 4th districts. 
  • In 2012, the last election year after redistricting, there were two open seat elections.
  • No districts are guaranteed to either party. Both Democratic and Republican candidates have filed to run in all four districts.
  • Fourteen candidates are running in the 2nd district, more than any other district. Five Republicans, including incumbent Rep. Mark Amodei, seven Democrats, and two third party candidates have filed to run.

Nevada’s U.S. House primaries are scheduled for June 14, 2022. Candidates who receive the most votes in the primary will advance to the general election.

Keep reading



# of contested primaries in Oregon at 10-year high

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. # of contested primaries in Oregon at 10-year high
  2. Candidate Connection spotlight: More updates from congressional candidates in Virginia
  3. Eight candidates running in Republican primary for North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District


# of contested primaries in Oregon at 10-year high

Voters in Oregon will have more decisions to make in their upcoming state legislative primaries than at any point since at least 2014. Of the 150 possible primaries, 38—or 25.4%—are being contested by more than one candidate. 

This is also the first time since 2014 with more contested Republican primaries than Democratic primaries. Similarly, for the first time since at least 2014, more Republicans filed to run for state legislative office than Democrats: 190 major party candidates filed, 90 Democrats (47%) and 100 Republicans (53%).

Here are some other key takeaways from Oregon’s primary filing deadline:

  1. Twenty-four districts were left open, meaning no incumbents filed to run. That’s the largest number of open districts since at least 2014. Fifteen of those districts have Democratic incumbents, and nine have Republican incumbents. With 75 districts up for election, that also means 32% of districts are guaranteed to be won by newcomers.
  2. Nine incumbents are facing primary challengers, or 18% of those who filed for re-election. That’s the largest percentage since at least 2014.
  3. Overall, 190 major party candidates filed, equaling 2.5 candidates per district, the same as in 2020 but higher than all previous cycles back to at least 2014.

The filing deadline for candidates running for state or federal office in Oregon this year was March 8. Candidates filed to run for all 100 state House districts and 15 of the state’s 30 Senate districts.

Oregon is a Democratic trifecta, with Democrats controlling the governorship and holding majorities in both chambers of the legislature: 18-11-1 in the Senate and 37-23 in the House.

Oregon’s state legislative primaries are scheduled for May 17, making them the sixth in the nation this election cycle.

Keep reading



Candidate Connection spotlight: More updates from congressional candidates in Virginia

Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey asks candidates for federal, state, and local office to share what motivates them on a personal and political level. We’ll be providing regular updates on races with a 100% survey completion rate in Thursday editions of the Brew this year.

As of April 19, 2022, we’re tracking 32 races with final candidate lists and a 100% Candidate Connection completion rate. Five of those races reached 100% completion in the past week.

What’s new this week

This week, we’re featuring two U.S. House primaries from Virginia—one Republican and one Democratic. Let’s start with the Republican primary in the 3rd Congressional District.

Ted Engquist (R) and Terry Namkung (R) are the two candidates on the Republican primary ballot in Virginia’s 3rd Congressional District. Located near Norfolk in southeastern Virginia, the 3rd District leans towards Democrats; incumbent Robert Scott (D), who is running for re-election this year, defeated John Collick (R) 68% to 31% in 2020.

Here’s how both candidates answered the question, “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

Ted Engquist:

“I feel we need to be fiscally responsible, protect the sanctity of human life, and improve education.”

Terry Namkung:

“Education: Virginians are rightfully worried about their children’s education. With schools spending more time teaching anti-conservative agendas, and less time teaching reading, math, and science, our educational outcomes are in rapid decline.

Medical: Your medical decisions should be between you and your doctor. You deserve the freedom to decide what is best for you and your family, and not for the federal government to decide on your behalf.

Immigration: A nation without borders is not a nation at all. In less than a year, the current Administration has created a historic economic and humanitarian crisis along the southern border. 1.7 million illegal immigrants have been apprehended attempting to enter the United States. And there are reports that over 1 million more may have entered the United States undetected.

Energy: Climate change is a real problem deserving of a real solution and conservatism for GOD’s green earth is the solution. We do not have to choose between economic growth and climate sustainability. In fact, sustainability is essential to long-term economic growth. But we must take an evidence-based approach to sustainability utilizing a capitalistic ideology from climate policy and technology integration.”

Next, let’s head north to the 8th Congressional District, located in the Washington, D.C. suburbs. Incumbent Don Beyer (D) and Victoria Virasingh (D) are the two Democrats running. Three election forecasters rate this seat Solid Democratic, meaning the winner of the Democratic primary is likely to win the general election. 

Here’s how the two answered the question, “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

Don Beyer:

“Don’s passions and key legislation are focused on climate change and the environment. In Congress, he is the leading voice on fusion energy and carbon pricing, leading the charge in working to take carbon out of the atmosphere.”

Victoria Virasingh:

“NEW LEADERSHIP FOR THE NEW ECONOMY New Leadership for the New Economy means investing in our workers, our small businesses, and our community. This means supporting small business owners and working families and making sure our district is building a bridge towards the future.

HOUSING Housing matters – a lot. Stable, affordable housing is critical for health and is tied to childhood academic performance. Home ownership often acts as a springboard for social mobility. And in an enduring legacy of the COVID-19 pandemic, the home has become much more than just a place of rest, a place of family, food, and friends. It has become an essential workplace and classroom. While the federal government is not in charge of local zoning decisions, policies at the federal level can facilitate and enable the creation of affordable and amenable living.

HEALTHCARE Healthcare is a human right. We need to expand Medicare to include dental and vision. We need lower prescription drug prices. The federal government should provide Medicare for all citizens and green card holders. This is a baseline service that people should expect to have in return for paying taxes, simple as that.”

About Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

We use the term race to describe a primary, runoff, or general election for a single office or seat or for a single set of seats that are elected as a batch. For example, a school board general election for three at-large seats where each voter selects three candidates would be one race, while a school board general election for three seats elected by district where each voter is voting for one candidate would be three separate races.

Some other details about the 32 races with a 100% response rate:

  • As of this week, there are 12 states with at least one race with a 100% response rate.
  • Thirteen of the 32 races are taking place in Texas.
  • Three of the 32 races are general elections.
  • Of the 29 primaries and runoffs, 17 are for the Democratic nomination and 12 are for the Republican nomination.
  • Sixteen of the 32 are races for U.S. House.

Keep reading 


Eight candidates running in Republican primary for North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District

Eight candidates are running in the Republican primary election for North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District on May 17, 2022. If no candidate receives more than 30% of the vote in the primary election, a runoff between the top two finishers will take place on July 26, 2022. The general election will take place on November 8, 2022. Incumbent Rep. Madison Cawthorn and Chuck Edwards have received the most media attention and endorsements.

Cawthorn was first elected to Congress in 2020. Cawthorn’s campaign website identified him as an America First candidate, a term often associated with the platform of former President Donald Trump (R) and candidates who say they support his agenda. Cawthorn has said that groups from across the political spectrum want to defeat him, saying, “the radical left, the establishment, and the media want to take me down . . . I won’t stop fighting. I won’t bow to the mob. They want to silence the America First movement. I’m not going anywhere.”

Edwards was first elected to the North Carolina State Senate in 2016. He told Jewish Insider that although he supported Cawthorn and wanted him to succeed, he “feel[s] that Western North Carolina can do better.” He has accused Cawthorn of increasing political tensions and criticized him for comments Cawthorn made suggesting supporters threaten House members to overturn the 2020 election results. Edwards has contrasted his legislative experience to Cawthorn’s, highlighting sponsorship of a bill that banned sanctuary cities in North Carolina and working on the state’s balanced budget.

Trump endorsed Cawthorn for re-election on March 31, 2021. U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis (R) endorsed Edwards, saying Cawthorn “has fallen well short of the most basic standards Western North Carolina expects from their representatives.”

The Republican nominee is expected to also win the general election. As of April 2022, three independent race forecasters rated the race as Safe Republican or Solid Republican, and Cook Political Report estimated that the district’s PVI was R+8. The 11th Congressional District contains all or parts of 15 counties in western North Carolina, including the city of Asheville.

Also running in the primary are Matthew Burril, Rod Honeycutt, Wendy Nevarez, Bruce O’Connell, Kristie Sluder, and Michele Woodhouse.

Keep reading



Certified ballot measures lags prior even years at this point in the cycle

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. So far this year, 84 measures have been certified for statewide ballots
  2. Candidate Connection spotlight: More from state legislative candidates in Illinois and Ohio
  3. Seventy candidates filed to run for 15 U.S. House districts in Ohio


Certified ballot measures lags prior even years at this point in the cycle

Eighty-four statewide measures have been certified for the ballot in 31 states so far this year, five less than the average number certified at this point in other even-numbered years from 2010 to 2020. 

Here’s an update on the latest ballot measure activity:

Three new measures were certified for the ballot last week:

  1. Alabama County and Municipality Economic and Industrial Development Financing Amendment (2022)
  2. Alabama Notice to Victim’s Family Required for Commutation or Reprieve of Death Sentences Amendment (2022)
  3. Maryland Requiring Howard County Circuit Court Judges to Serve on Orphan Court Amendment (2022)

Enough signatures were verified for five initiatives in Alaska, Massachusetts, and Ohio to certify them to the legislature: 

  1. Alaska State Recognition of American Indian Tribes Initiative (2022)
  2. Massachusetts App-Based Drivers as Contractors and Labor Policies Initiative (2022)
  3. Massachusetts Changes to Alcohol Retail Licensing Initiative (2022)
  4. Massachusetts Medical Loss Ratios for Dental Insurance Plans Initiative (2022)
  5. Ohio Marijuana Legalization Initiative (2022)

From 2010 to 2020, the average number of statewide ballot measures certified in an even-numbered year was 164. By this time during even-numbered years from 2010 through 2020, an average of 89 statewide measures had been certified for the ballot. 

Keep reading



Candidate Connection spotlight: More from state legislative candidates in Illinois and Ohio

Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey asks candidates for federal, state, and local office to share what motivates them on a personal and political level. We’ll be providing regular updates on races with a 100% survey completion rate in Thursday editions of the Brew this year.

As of April 12, 2022, we’re tracking 27 races with final candidate lists and a 100% Candidate Connection completion rate. Three of those races reached 100% completion in the past week.

What’s new this week

This week, we’re featuring new responses from candidates in two state legislative primaries—one Democratic primary and one Republican primary. Let’s start with the Democratic primary for a seat in the Ohio House.

Two candidates are running for the Democratic nomination for Ohio House of Representatives District 83: Melissa Kritzell (D) and Claire Osborne (D). Incumbent Jon Cross (R) is the only other candidate on the ballot. The last time the seat was up, in 2020, Cross defeated write-in candidate Mary Harshfield (D) 96% to 4%, although Ohio has not yet approved new state legislative district lines and the new District 83 may differ from the old district boundaries. All 99 seats in the Ohio House, currently under a 64-34 Republican majority with one vacant seat, are up for election this year.

Here’s how Kritzell and Osborne answered the question, “Who are you? Tell us about yourself.”

Kritzell:

“My name is Melissa Kritzell. In 1976, I was born in Shelbyville, Indiana. My parents raised five children: two brothers, two sisters, and me-the youngest. I grew up in a conservative-Christian household. My father worked full time and my mom stayed home to care for my grandparents.

Throughout my younger years, my family endured several struggles. When my father quit his job in 1989, we moved to Ohio where we survived on my mother’s social security, food stamps, and disability. We did not have running water. . I did not consider my parents very politically active, however, they did vote in Presidential elections. As I got older, I realized how close-minded my parents were. They did not agree with Democratic ideals. It was their treatment of President Bill Clinton and First Lady Hillary Clinton, in 1992, that helped form my politics. I married at the age of 17 and am still happily married to my husband, Larry, almost 27 years later. Because of my diagnosis of ovarian cancer in September 1995 (at 18 years old), I feel strongly about affordable and accessible women’s healthcare. I’ve served on the Caucus and am also an Advocate Leader with the Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance. Today, I am happy to say that I am still in remission. In 2000, I received my GED, and in 2005, I became a State Tested Nurse’s Aide. As Senator Warren says, “Dream big, fight hard.” This is a quote that I live by. MY MISSION: I am running to be your next Ohio State 83rd District Representative.”

Osborne:

“I am a Licensed Social Worker and have my master’s in community social work. I was raised in Upper Sandusky, Ohio but now live and work in Findlay, Ohio. My mother was the first in her family to go to college and is a public school teacher knowing first hand how important strong public education is. My father became the first in his family to go to college not by choice but because when the automotive factory he worked at shut down he knew he had to do something different to provide for his family. I know first hand how poor policy decisions at the local and state level hurt communities. Today I work as a Program Manager for a local peer Recovery Community Organization.”

Next, let’s turn to Illinois House of Representatives District 36, where two candidates are running for the Republican nomination: Robbie Segina (R) and David Sheppard (R). The only other candidate on the ballot is incumbent Kelly M. Burke (D). The last time there was a contested general election for this seat was in 2012; no Republicans ran for the seat between 2014 and 2018. That year, Burke defeated Bob Shelstrom (R) 68% to 32%. All 118 seats in the Illinois House, currently under a 73-45 Democratic majority, are up for election this year.

Here’s how Segina and Sheppard answered the question, “Who are you? Tell us about yourself.”

Segina:

“Patriotic American, mother of 3. Grew up on SW side of Chicago and have lived in Oak Lawn for last 27 years. Worked as a Workers Compensation Specialist supervising staff and managing Workers Compensation claims. Robbie did this for 3 0 years and retired. I’m retired and currently serve as an Independent Avon Representative. Robbie believes in Parents rights/school choice, Law and Order/More police in high crime areas/Violent criminals belong behind bars/stop No bail laws, Election Integrity/voter ID laws, Constitutional rights, fiscal responsibility, Lower Taxes and I’m Pro Life.”

Sheppard:

“Welcome, my name is David Sheppard. I’m a father, son, and husband. I love my family and I love this great state, Illinois. As a veteran, I served the United States in the Navy. In Illinois, I served my Community as a Police Officer for almost three decades. I now want to serve Illinois as your next State Representative in the 36th District. When I am elected, I will serve every Illinois resident, regardless of race, religion, or political party. We all love our children and family. Our neighbors and friends. We have seen too many of them flee this state after the governor shutdown this state, causing businesses to fail and residents to lose their jobs and homes. As a Police Officer, I have seen what crime has done to our families and communities. It’s time for leadership that will not criminalize Police work, but instead hold criminals accountable for their actions. I will create civil and criminal liabilities for those who release dangerous criminals, only for them to later commit murder and other hideous crimes. We need to combat the criminals and take back our streets.”

About Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

We use the term race to describe a primary, runoff, or general election for a single office or seat or for a single set of seats that are elected as a batch. For example, a school board general election for three at-large seats where each voter selects three candidates would be one race, while a school board general election for three seats elected by district where each voter is voting for one candidate would be three separate races.

Some other details about the 27 races with a 100% response rate:

  • As of this week, there are nine states with at least one race with a 100% response rate.
  • Thirteen of the 27 races are taking place in Texas.
  • Three of the 27 races are general elections.
  • Of the 24 primaries and runoffs, 15 are for the Democratic nomination and nine are for the Republican nomination.
  • Thirteen of the 27 are races for U.S. House.

Keep reading 


Seventy candidates filed to run for 15 U.S. House districts in Ohio

The filing deadline for candidates running for the U.S. House of Representatives in Ohio was March 4, 2022. This year, 70 candidates filed to run in Ohio’s 15 U.S. House districts, including 39 Republicans, 29 Democrats, and two independents. That’s 4.7 candidates per district, more than the 4.4 candidates per district in 2020 and fewer than the 5.5 in 2018.

So far, Ballotpedia staff have completed post-filing analysis on 15 states where U.S. House filing deadlines have passed. Across those 15 states, an average of 5.7 candidates have filed per seat, up from 5.3 in 2020 and 5.4 in 2018.

The Ohio Redistricting Commission approved a redrawn congressional map on March 2 in a 5-2 vote along party lines, meaning the map will last for four years. On March 18, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that it did not have jurisdiction to overturn the map as part of the legal challenge that overturned the initial congressional map. The revised map will be in effect for Ohio’s 2022 congressional elections unless a court rules otherwise in response to a legal challenge.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  1. This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Ohio was apportioned 15 seats in the House of Representatives, one less than it received after the 2010 census.
  2. Although Rep. Bob Gibbs (R) originally filed for re-election, he announced on April 6 that he was retiring. Early voting has already begun, and his name will still appear on the ballot.
  3. Ohio’s 13th Congressional District is also an open-seat race. Rep. Tim Ryan (D) is running for election to the U.S. Senate. Seven candidates are running for the Republican nomination to face state Rep. and former House minority leader Emilia Sykes (D), who is unopposed for her party’s nomination.
  4. There are 19 contested U.S. House primaries —10 Republican and nine Democratic —this year in Ohio.
  5. The two open U.S. House seats this year is the same number as in 2018. All U.S. House incumbents in Ohio ran for re-election in 2020.
  6. Six incumbents do not face primary challengers.
  7. All 15 U.S. House districts will be contested in the general election, as every district has both Democratic and Republican candidates.

Ohio’s primary for U.S. House districts is scheduled for May 3, 2022. The Ohio Supreme Court announced on March 29 that it will not decide challenges to the state’s congressional map until after that date.

Keep reading



Number of open U.S. House seats in Oregon reaches decade high

The filing deadline for candidates running for state or federal office in Oregon was March 8, 2022. This year, 46 candidates are running in Oregon’s six U.S. House districts, including 26 Democrats, 19 Republicans, and one independent. That’s 7.7 candidates per district, down from 9.2 candidates per district in 2020 and 8.4 in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Oregon was apportioned six seats following the 2020 census, up one from the five the state was apportioned after the 2010 census.
  • Two of Oregon’s six U.S. House seats are open this year; the new seat in the 6th District and the seat in the 4th District. 4th District incumbent Peter DeFazio (D) is retiring from politics.
  • Oregon’s two open seats this year is the most since at least 2012. The only other election year since 2012 with an open seat was 2020. That year, one seat was open.
  • All four incumbents running for re-election will face at least one primary challenger this year.
  • At least one Democrat and one Republican filed in all six districts, meaning there are no districts where one major party is all but guaranteed to win because no candidates from the other party filed.
  • Sixteen candidates filed to run in the new 6th District, more than any other. This number includes nine Democrats and seven Republicans.

Oregon’s U.S. House primaries will take place on May 17.

Additional reading:



Candidates for office in Nevada and North Carolina complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Candidate Connection survey update—Four races reached 100% completion last week; featured responses from Nevada State Assembly District 2 and North Carolina House of Representatives District 37
  2. Judge removes and then reinstates five members of a Pennsylvania school board
  3. North Carolina U.S. House filings reach decade high


Candidates for office in Nevada and North Carolina complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey asks candidates for federal, state, and local office to share what motivates them on a personal and political level. We’ll be providing regular updates on races with a 100% survey completion rate in Thursday editions of the Brew this year.

As of April 5, 2022, we’re tracking 24 races with final candidate lists and a 100% Candidate Connection completion rate. Four of those races reached 100% completion in the past week.

What’s new this week

Two candidates are running for the Republican nomination for Nevada State Assembly District 2: incumbent Heidi Kasama (R) and Erin Gomez (R). Nick Christenson (D) and Jason Bednarz (L) are also running for the seat. The last time the seat was up, in 2020, Kasama defeated Radhika Kunnel (D) 54% to 44%. All 42 seats in the Nevada State Assembly, currently under a 26-16 Democratic majority, are up for election this year.

Here’s how Kasama and Gomez answered two selected survey questions:

Heidi Kasama:

What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

“Expanding and diversifying our economy as well as improvements to our system of education and health care.”

Both sitting legislators and candidates for office hear many personal stories from the residents of their district. Is there a story that you’ve heard that you found particularly touching, memorable, or impactful?

“There are many but I hear consistently the impact of high health care costs on my constituents and this needs to be reigned in.”

Erin Gomez:

What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

“My key passion would be to restore our election so everyone feels confident.”

Both sitting legislators and candidates for office hear many personal stories from the residents of their district. Is there a story that you’ve heard that you found particularly touching, memorable, or impactful?

“I’ve heard a lot of things that people have said, that’s the reason I’m running is because peoples lives have been destroyed over the past two years due to governors and decisions people have made and that’s why am running.”

Three candidates are running for the Democratic nomination for North Carolina House of Representatives District 37: Mary Bethel (D), Christine Kelly (D), and Elizabeth Parent (D). Incumbent Erin Paré (R) and Christopher Robinson (L) are also running for the seat. The last time the seat was up, in 2020, Paré defeated then-incumbent Sydney Batch (D) 50% to 47%. All 120 seats in the North Carolina House of Representatives, currently under a 69-51 Republican majority, are up for election this year.

Here’s how Bethel, Kelly, and Parent answered the question, “Who are you? Tell us about yourself.”

Mary Bethel:

“After a career working as an advocate for older adult and persons with disabilities, which included 20+ years interacting with the NC General Assembly to seek legislation and state appropriations that would benefit these groups, I am throwing my hat in the ring for the House seat in my District. Over my career, I have used by people skills, my willingness to listen to broad perspectives, and my leadership abilities to craft common-sense solutions to many problems. As our state emerges from the impact of COVID, I want to be engaged in the process of helping to develop solutions to move us forward in North Carolina.”

Christine Kelly:

“Christine Kelly moved to Southern Wake County 30 years ago where she raised her family, made a home, and became a part of a diverse community. While she still lives in the same house, the community has seen a lot of change, and she is proud to say that she has been a key driver of that change by being active in serving her community. Christine proudly served for four years on the Holly Springs Town Council, and worked to implement policies to: protect her local environment, attract prestigious businesses, and honor the City’s history. She also fought for greater accountability and transparency from local government.

Christine earned a Bachelor of Math and a Masters of Wealth and Trust Management. Her love of numbers led her to SAS Institute, a company dedicated to empowering minds through data analytics, where she has worked for over 30 years. As a naturalized citizen, born and raised in Canada, Christine understands the importance of having a government that works for all people.

In the NC House, Christine will work to ensure: a community that is safe for all, health coverage for all, properly funded education, and a clean and healthy environment. Christine aims to represent District 37 so that all residents in Southern Wake County have the opportunity for a better quality-of-life.”

Elizabeth Parent:

“Elizabeth Parent was born in Littleton, Colorado and soon after, her family moved to Poulsbo, Washington where Elizabeth was raised on a small family farm. Elizabeth is a mother of three young children, wife to an Army Veteran, a childhood sexual abuse survivor, and a honey beekeeper. Elizabeth serves on the board of the Artist Aliance of the Triangle, and has been a leader for various chapters of MOMS Club – a non-profit serving moms in the community.”

About Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

We use the term race to describe a primary, runoff, or general election for a single office or seat or for a single set of seats that are elected as a batch. For example, a school board general election for three at-large seats where each voter selects three candidates would be one race, while a school board general election for three seats elected by district where each voter is voting for one candidate would be three separate races.

Some other details about the 24 races with a 100% response rate:

  • As of this week, there are eight states with at least one race with a 100% response rate.
  • Thirteen of the 24 races are taking place in Texas.
  • Three of the 24 races are general elections.
  • Of the 21 primaries and primary runoffs, 13 are for the Democratic nomination and eight are for the Republican nomination.
  • Twelve of the 24 are races for U.S. House.

Keep reading



Judge removes and then reinstates five members of a Pennsylvania school board

Subscribers to Ballotpedia’s Hall Pass saw this yesterday; Ballotpedia’s Hall Pass is a free newsletter tracking the conversations driving school board politics and education policy. Click here for more information and a link to subscribe.

On March 30, Chester County, Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas Judge William Mahon ordered the removal from office of five members of the West Chester Area School District School Board. The order was issued in response to a petition calling for the removal of school board members who had voted in favor of a mandatory mask policy. Beth Ann Rosica, a parent in the district and the executive director of Back to School PA, filed the petition on Feb. 13.

Mahon said his decision had been prompted by the school districts’ attorneys not responding to Rosica’s petition ahead of a March 15 deadline. The district’s attorneys asked that Mahon reconsider, saying the actual deadline for a formal response was April 4. On April 1, Mahon reversed his earlier decision, reinstating the board members and allowing the case to proceed.

The petition calling for the members’ removal cited a 1949 Pennsylvania statute allowing any 10 taxpayers in a given school district to file a petition in county court to remove school board directors if any “(1) fail to organize as hereafter provided, or (2) refuse or neglect to perform any duty imposed upon it by the provisions of this act relating to school districts, or (3) being a party to a joint board agreement refuse or neglect to perform any duty imposed upon it by the provisions of this act relating to joint boards or by the joint board agreement.”

In a press release when she filed her petition, Rosica said, “Parents all over Chester County are exacerbated over the current masking policies of their school districts. Several parents have taken their frustrations to the next level by filing petitions with county court to recall those board members who voted to mask children.” Rosica added that the school board’s decision to continue a mask mandate after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court struck down the statewide school mask requirement on Dec. 10 was illegal.

All five members named in the petition, including the board president, are Democrats. Democrats control a 6-3 majority on the board after flipping two seats in the 2021 elections. We identified this election in our 2021 report on conflicts in school board elections.

Both sides will have 45 days to collect evidence and file for a hearing before Mahon.

Since the start of the pandemic, 35 states have required masks in schools at some point. Click here to learn more about school responses to the pandemic. 

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North Carolina U.S. House filings reach decade high

The filing deadline for candidates running for state or federal office in North Carolina was March 4. This year, 103 candidates are running for North Carolina’s 14 U.S. House districts, including 60 Republicans, 40 Democrats, two Libertarians, and one independent. That’s 7.4 candidates per district, up 42% from 5.3 in 2020 and 5.0 in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. North Carolina was apportioned 14 seats after the 2020 census, up from 13 seats in the last round of apportionment following the 2010 census.
  • Two members of North Carolina’s U.S. House delegation are running for re-election in a different district than the one they currently represent. Richard Hudson (R), who represents the 8th District, is running for re-election in the 9th District. Dan Bishop (R), who represents the 9th District, is running for re-election in the 8th District.
  • Four seats are open, meaning no incumbent is running. In addition to the newly-created 14th District, they are the 1st, 4th, and 13th District seats.
  • Ted Budd (R), who currently represents the 13th District, is running for U.S. Senate rather than seeking re-election. G.K. Butterfield (D) and David Price (D), who represent the 1st and 4th districts, respectively, are retiring from politics.
  • This year’s four open seats is the most since at least 2012. There were three open seats in 2020 and none in 2018.
  • There are three districts this year where incumbents do not face primary challenges.
  • Fifteen candidates filed to run in the 11th District, more than any other. This figure includes eight Republicans, six Democrats, and one Libertarian.

North Carolina’s U.S. House primaries will take place on May 17. A candidate must receive at least 30% of the vote plus one to win the primary outright. In the event no candidate reaches this threshold, the top two finishers will advance to a July 26 runoff.

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What’s on the ballot today

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Milwaukee mayoral race headlines today’s elections
  2. A look at upcoming Article III judicial vacancies
  3. Help us continue our coverage! Join the Ballotpedia Society today


What’s on the ballot today

Milwaukee’s mayoral election is in the spotlight as the city heads to the polls. Ballotpedia is tracking elections within our coverage scope in seven states today. The race to fill out the remainder of former mayor Tom Barrett’s unexpired term is the only battleground among them.

Acting Mayor Cavalier Johnson and Robert Donovan are the two candidates who advanced from a seven-candidate Feb. 15 primary, with 42% and 22% of the vote respectively. Although the race is officially nonpartisan, Johnson has said he is a Democrat. Donovan described himself as an independent in a 2016 run for the office.

Both candidates have served on the Milwaukee Common Council. The 15-member council is the city’s legislative body and is the equivalent of the city council in other U.S. cities. Johnson, who is serving as acting mayor in his capacity as council president, was elected to the council in 2016 and became council president in 2020. Donovan served on the council from 2000 to 2020.

Both candidates have campaigned on their public safety plans. Donovan says Milwaukee has never been less safe than during the two years Johnson served as council president and says he would increase police staffing levels and step up patrols. Johnson says he worked to establish funding for 200 new officers while council president and that Donovan’s public safety plan had not been updated since 2016.

Other elections within Ballotpedia’s coverage scope today include local and municipal elections throughout Wisconsin, Oklahoma, and Missouri, as well as in Anchorage, Alaska. There are also state legislative special elections ongoing in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania, as well as a special primary for the California U.S. House district last represented by Devin Nunes (R).

The special election to replace Nunes will be the eighth to take place since the start of the 117th Congress in January 2021. As of April 5, 2020, there had been three special elections for seats in the 116th Congress. As of April 5, 2018, there had been eight special elections for seats in the 115th Congress.

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Help us continue our coverage! Join the Ballotpedia Society today

As a Brew reader, we know that you care about having the information necessary to make decisions that match your values and allow you to vote with confidence. That’s why you and millions of Americans turn to Ballotpedia.

There are over 125,000 elections a year in the United States, some of which are happening today! It’s imperative that America’s voters have clear, concise, and unbiased information about the candidates and issues on their ballots, and with your monthly support, Ballotpedia can work to close the gap to cover every single electoral race in the USA!

But we can’t do it without you, and as a member of the Ballotpedia Society, your tax deductible contribution will help make that happen!

Become a Ballotpedia Society member today! 


A look at upcoming Article III judicial vacancies

According to the latest vacancy data from the U.S. Courts, there were 34 total announced upcoming vacancies for Article III judgeships. Article III judgeships refer to federal judges who serve on one of the 13 U.S. courts of appeal, 94 U.S. district courts, and on the Court of International Trade. These are lifetime appointments made by the president and confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

These positions are not yet vacant but will be at some point in the future with every judge having announced his or her intent to either leave the bench or assume senior status. In the meantime, these judges will continue to serve in their current positions.

The president and Senate do not need to wait for a position to become vacant before they can start the confirmation process for a successor. For example, the process has already begun for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, who was nominated to replace Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer when he vacates the seat at the beginning of the court’s summer recess. The Senate Judiciary Committee voted yesterday on whether to advance Jackson’s nomination to the full Senate. In all, there are six nominees pending for upcoming vacancies.

Twenty-two vacancy effective dates have not been determined because the judge has not announced the date he or she will leave the bench. The next upcoming scheduled vacancy will take place on April 17, 2022, when U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California Judge John Mendez assumes senior status.

In addition to these 34 upcoming vacancies, there are 73 current Article III vacancies in the federal judiciary out of the 870 total Article III judgeships. At roughly the same point in President Trump’s first term (March 30, 2018), there were 148 current Article III vacancies.

President Biden has nominated 83 individuals to federal judgeships on Article III courts. Fifty-eight of those nominees have been confirmed. Of the 25 nominees going through the confirmation process, 11 are awaiting a vote in the U.S. Senate, six are awaiting a committee vote, and eight are awaiting a committee hearing.

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North Carolina U.S. House filings reach decade high

The filing deadline for candidates running for state or federal office in North Carolina was March 4. This year, 103 candidates are running for North Carolina’s 14 U.S. House districts, including 60 Republicans, 40 Democrats, two Libertarians, and one independent. That’s 7.4 candidates per district, up from 5.3 in 2020 and 5.0 in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. North Carolina was apportioned 14 seats after the 2020 census, up from 13 seats in the last round of apportionment following the 2010 census.
  • Two members of North Carolina’s U.S. House delegation are running for re-election in a different district than the one they currently represent. Richard Hudson (R), who represents the 8th District, is running for re-election in the 9th District. Dan Bishop (R), who represents the 9th District, is running for re-election in the 8th District.
  • Four seats are open, meaning no incumbent is running. In addition to the newly-created 14th District, they are the 1st, 4th, and 13th District seats.
  • Ted Budd (R), who currently represents the 13th District, is running for U.S. Senate rather than seeking re-election. G.K. Butterfield (D) and David Price (D), who represent the 1st and 4th districts, respectively, are retiring from politics.
  • This year’s four open seats is the most since at least 2012. There were three open seats in 2020 and none in 2018.
  • There are three districts this year where incumbents do not face primary challenges.
  • Fifteen candidates filed to run in the 11th District, more than any other. This figure includes eight Republicans, six Democrats, and one Libertarian.

North Carolina’s U.S. House primaries will take place on May 17. A candidate must receive at least 30% of the vote plus one to win the primary outright. In the event no candidate reaches this threshold, the top two finishers will advance to a July 26 runoff.

Additional reading: