Author

David Luchs

David Luchs is a staff writer at Ballotpedia and can be reached at david.luchs@ballotpedia.org

Frank Mrvan wins Democratic nomination in Indiana’s 1st District to succeed Pete Visclosky

Frank Mrvan (D) defeated 14 other candidates to win the Democratic nomination to succeed outgoing Rep. Pete Visclosky (D) in Indiana’s 1st Congressional District. As of 10:50 p.m. Central Time, Mrvan had received 33.6% of the vote to Thomas McDermott Jr.’s 29.3%. No other candidate had received more than 10% of the vote. This was the first open primary for the seat since 1932; Visclosky first won election by defeating Katie Hall (D) in the 1984 Democratic primary. Mrvan will face Mark Leyva (R) in the November general election. Election forecasters rate the seat Safe Democratic.



Yvette Herrell wins Republican nomination in New Mexico’s 2nd District, sets up rematch with Xochitl Torres Small

Yvette Herrell defeated Claire Chase and Chris Mathys to win the Republican nomination in New Mexico’s 2nd Congressional District. As of 11:05 p.m. Mountain Time, Herrell had received 45.6% of the vote with 83% of precincts reporting. Chase followed with 32.1%, while Mathys had 22.4%. Herrell, who had been the GOP’s 2018 nominee, will again face Rep. Xochitl Torres Small (D) in the general election. In 2018, Torres Small defeated Herrell 50.9% to 49.1%.


Steve King (R) becomes second member of Congress to lose a primary in 2020

State Sen. Randy Feenstra (R) defeated Rep. Steve King (R) in the Republican primary for Iowa’s 4th Congressional District. As of 10:30 p.m. Central Time, Feenstra had received 40.6% of the vote to King’s 38.7%. No other candidate had received more than 10% of the vote.
Feenstra will face Democratic nominee J.D. Scholten in the November general election. The last Democrat to win election from the 4th district was Neal Smith (D) in 1992.
King is the second member of the U.S. House to lose a primary this year. Marie Newman defeated Rep. Dan Lipinski in the Democratic primary in Illinois’ 3rd Congressional District in March.
In 2018, four members of the House were defeated in primaries: Michael Capuano (D-Mass.), Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.), Robert Pittenger (R-N.C.), and Mark Sanford (R-S.C.).


Theresa Greenfield wins Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in Iowa

Theresa Greenfield defeated Michael Franken, Kimberly Graham, and Eddie Mauro to win the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate in Iowa. As of 9:30 p.m. Central Time, Greenfield had received 44.9% of the vote with 6% of precincts reporting. Franken followed with 26.6%, while Graham had 15.6%, and Mauro had 11.7%. A fifth candidate, Cal Woods, withdrew on May 4 and endorsed Franken. Greenfield will face first-term Sen. Joni Ernst (R) in the general election.
Greenfield will face incumbent Joni Ernst (R) in the general election. Ernst was first elected in 2014, winning 52% of the vote.


Victoria Spartz wins Republican nomination in Indiana’s 5th Congressional District

First-term state Sen. Victoria Spartz (R) defeated 14 other candidates to win the Republican nomination to succeed outgoing Rep. Susan Brooks (R) in Indiana’s 5th Congressional District. As of 7:20 p.m. Central Time, Spartz had received 39.0% of the vote to Beth Henderson’s (R) 19.2% and Micah Beckwith’s (R) 11.6%. No other candidate had received more than 10% of the vote.
Over 90% of the satellite spending in the race took the form of mailers and advertisements from the Club for Growth in opposition to Henderson and Carl Brizzi (R).
Spartz will face the winner of the Democratic primary in the general election, which two forecasters rate “Leans Republican” and a third rates “Likely Republican”.


Oregon state legislative primaries see no incumbents defeated and an increase in competitiveness from 2018

May 19, 2020, was the ballot return due date for voters participating in Oregon’s 2020 primary elections. This year, 16 of the 30 seats in the state senate and all 60 seats in the state house are up for election. There were 33 contested state legislative primaries, six of which were for state senate seats and 27 of which were for state house seats. Twenty of the contested primaries were Democratic races and 13 were Republican. Oregon’s 33 contested primaries are a 32% increase from the 25 held in 2018 and are the most since at least 2010.

In all, 189 major-party candidates filed for state legislative seats in Oregon this year, including 104 Democrats and 85 Republicans. This is an 18% increase from the 160 candidates who filed in 2018.

Both chambers had an above-average number of open seats relative to recent elections. Between 2010 and 2018, an average of 2.2 state senate seats and 9.8 state house seats were open in Oregon each even-numbered year. This year, there were four open state senate seats and 12 open state house seats. This was more than in 2018—when there was one open senate seat and seven open house seats—but less than in 2016, when there were four open state senate seats and 14 open house seats.

Four incumbents faced primary challengers: state Sens. Ginny Burdick (D-18) and Bill Hansell (R-29) and state Reps. Paul Holvey (D-08) and Rob Nosse (D-42). All four advanced to the general election. An incumbent seeking re-election will appear on the general election ballot for 12 of the 16 senate districts and 48 of the 60 state house districts.

Oregon’s only state legislative district with both a contested Democratic primary and a contested Republican primary was House District 32. Located in Oregon’s northwestern corner, District 32 is currently represented by Tiffiny Mitchell, who is not running for re-election. Mitchell was the target of a recall campaign in 2019 that did not make the ballot.

Heading into the general election, Democrats hold an 18-12 supermajority in the state senate and a 37-22 supermajority in the state house. Because Gov. Kate Brown is also a Democrat, Oregon is one of 15 Democratic trifectas.

The winners of the general election will be responsible for drawing up new state legislative and congressional district boundaries after the 2020 census is completed.

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RNC outraises DNC by nearly two-to-one, Republican Hill committees outraise Democratic counterparts

The Republican National Committee (RNC) outraised the Democratic National Committee (DNC) by nearly two-to-one in April, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on May 20. The DNC had reported its best fundraising totals of the campaign cycle in March 2020, outraising the RNC for the first time since October 2018.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $11.5 million and spent $6.2 million last month, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $9.0 million and spent $5.0 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 8.8% more than the DSCC ($109.5 million to $100.3 million). The NRSC’s 8.8% fundraising advantage is up from 7.0% in April but down from 10.1% in March.

On the House side, the National Republican Campaign Committee (NRCC) raised $11.4 million and spent $8.0 million, while the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $11.3 million and spent $9.6 million. So far in the cycle, the DCCC has raised 27.8% more than the NRCC ($179.8 million to $135.9 million). The DCCC’s 27.8% fundraising advantage is down from 30.0% in April and 30.9% in March.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising, although their advantage in the House was smaller than in this cycle. The DSCC had raised 17.6% more than the NRSC ($76.3 million to $63.9 million), while the DCCC had raised 21.5% more than the NRCC ($150.9 million to $121.6 million).

Last month, the RNC raised $27.1 million and spent $27.0 million to the DNC’s $15.3 million in fundraising and $10.7 million in spending. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 72.4% more than the DNC ($345.7 million to $161.9 million). The RNC’s 72.4% fundraising advantage is down from 73.9% in April and 88.4% in March.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle), the RNC had a smaller 44.0% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($150.4 million to $96.2 million).

So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 28.9% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($591.1 million to $442.0 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is up from 28.4% in April but down from 35.0% in March.

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Biden outraised Trump in April, Trump continues to lead in overall fundraising and cash on hand

Joe Biden outraised Donald Trump by more than two-to-one last month, while Trump had a nearly two-to-one advantage in cash on hand, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on May 20.

The Biden campaign raised $43.6 million in April, 88% more than the Trump campaign’s $16.9 million. Biden’s campaign spent 50% more than Trump’s ($12.9 million to $7.7 million). As of April 30, the Trump campaign had 61% more cash on hand than the Biden campaign ($107.7 million to $57.1 million). Trump continues to lead Biden in overall fundraising since the beginning of 2017, having raised 38% more ($262.5 million to $178.4 million).

Biden’s campaign raised 6.6% less in April than it did in March ($43.6 million versus $46.7 million), while Trump’s raised 24.3% more ($16.9 million versus $13.6 million).

Trump’s $262.5 million in overall fundraising is the second-highest figure for any presidential candidate at this point in the past three elections. The only candidate that outraised Trump was Barack Obama (D), who had raised an inflation-adjusted $345.7 million as of May 2008. Trump’s cash-on-hand total of $107.7 million is also the second-highest during this time, bested only by Obama’s inflation-adjusted $132.4 million at this point in his re-election campaign.

Biden and Trump’s combined $441.0 million in fundraising is the second-highest combined total when compared to the past three election cycles. At this point in the 2008 campaign, Obama and John McCain (R) had raised a combined inflation-adjusted $473.2 million.

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Joe Biden outraises Donald Trump in March while Trump retains cash on hand advantage

Joe Biden outraised Donald Trump by more than three-to-one last month, while Trump had a nearly four-to-one advantage in cash on hand, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission Monday.

The Biden campaign raised $46.7 million in March, 110% more than the Trump campaign’s $13.6 million. Biden’s campaign spent 109% more than Trump’s ($32.5 million to $9.6 million). As of March 31, the Trump campaign had 115% more cash on hand than the Biden campaign ($98.5 million to $26.4 million). Trump continues to lead Biden in overall fundraising since the beginning of 2017, having raised 58% more ($245.6 million to $134.8 million).

Trump’s $245.6 million in overall fundraising is the second-highest figure for any presidential candidate at this point in the past three elections. The only candidate to have out-raised Trump was Barack Obama (D), who had raised an inflation-adjusted $305.1 million as of April 2008. Trump’s cash-on-hand figure is also the second-highest during this time, bested only by Obama’s inflation-adjusted $119.7 million at this point in his re-election campaign.

Biden and Trump’s combined $380.4 million in fundraising is the second-highest combined total when compared to the past three election cycles. At this point in the 2008 campaign, Obama and John McCain (R) had raised a combined inflation-adjusted $409.1 million.



DNC outraises RNC for the first time in the 2020 election cycle

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) outraised the Republican National Committee (RNC) for the first time since October 2018 last month, according to April 2020 campaign finance reports filed with the FEC Monday.

The DNC raised $32.7 million and spent $11.0 million to the RNC’s $24.0 million in fundraising and $23.8 million in spending. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 73.9% more than the DNC ($318.6 million to $146.7 million). The RNC’s 73.9% fundraising advantage is down from 88.4% in March and 89.8% in February.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle) the RNC had a smaller 44.5% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($137.9 million to $87.7 million).

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $11.0 million and spent $6.1 million last month, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $9.1 million and spent $6.9 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 7.0% more than the DSCC ($98.0 million to $91.3 million). The NRSC’s 7.0% fundraising advantage is down from 10.1% in March and 8.4% in February.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $14.3 million and spent $6.2 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $11.6 million and spent $7.9 million. So far in the cycle, the DCCC has raised 30.0% more than the NRCC ($168.4 million to $124.5 million). The DCCC’s 30.0% fundraising advantage is down from 30.9% in March and 33.4% in February.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising, although their advantage in the House was smaller than in this cycle. The DSCC had raised 20.8% more than the NRSC ($71.3 million to $57.9 million), while the DCCC had raised 18.4% more than the NRCC ($139.7 million to $116.2 million).

So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 28.4% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($541.0 million to $406.5 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is down from 35.0% in March and 35.3% in February.

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