Author

David Luchs

David Luchs is a staff writer at Ballotpedia and can be reached at david.luchs@ballotpedia.org

Tom Steyer leads in pageviews for the first time this year

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.
 
Tom Steyer’s campaign page on Ballotpedia received 4,081 views for the week of November 24-30. Steyer’s pageview figure represents 11.8% of the pageviews for the week. Pete Buttigieg had 9.9% of the pageviews for the week, followed by Andrew Yang with 8.6%. The previous week, Buttigieg had the most pageviews, followed by Tulsi Gabbard, then Steyer. This is Tom Steyer’s first week this year leading in pageviews.
 
Every Democratic candidate other than Steyer had fewer pageviews last week than the week before. Steyer’s pageviews increased by 22% while all other Democrats had a decrease between 11% and 37%.
 
Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews this year with 147,622. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg with 141,510 and Joe Biden with 131,910.
 


Pete Buttigieg leads in pageviews for the first time since June, Williamson is seventh Democratic candidate to reach 100,000 pageviews

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.
 
Pete Buttigieg’s campaign page on Ballotpedia received 4,382 views for the week of November 17-23. Buttigieg’s pageview figure represents 10.3% of the pageviews for the week. Tulsi Gabbard had 8.4% of the pageviews for the week, followed by Tom Steyer with 7.9%. None of the three were among the top three Democrats for pageviews the week before. This is Buttigieg’s first time leading in pageviews since the week of June 9-15.
 
Every Democratic candidate had at least 19% more pageviews last week than the week before. The three candidates with the largest increases in pageviews were Deval Patrick (293%), Tulsi Gabbard (194%), and Amy Klobuchar (121%).
 
Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews this year with 144,654. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg with 138,084 and Joe Biden with 129,749. Marianne Williamson had 1,786 pageviews last week, bringing her total for the year to 100,048. Williamson is the seventh Democratic candidate to reach 100,000 pageviews.
 
For more information on pageviews and detailed lifetime stats, click the linke below.


RNC outraises DNC by more than two-to-one for a sixth consecutive month, Democrats retain House committee fundraising lead

The Republican National Committee (RNC) has outraised its Democratic counterpart by more than two-to-one for a sixth consecutive month, while the Democratic House committee outraised its Republican counterpart, according to November 2019 campaign finance reports filed with the FEC Wednesday.
 
The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $6.7 million and spent $4.8 million last month, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $5.4 million and spent $5.6 million. In the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 8.8% more than the DSCC ($54.4 million to $49.8 million). The NRSC’s 8.8% fundraising advantage is up from 7.1% in October but down from 12.3% in September.
 
On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $12.2 million and spent $4.8 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $10.0 million and spent $5.6 million. In the 2020 cycle, the DCCC has raised 36.0% more than the NRCC ($101.3 million to $70.4 million). The DCCC’s 36.0% fundraising advantage is down from 38.4% in October and 36.6% in September.
 
At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising, although their advantage in the House was smaller than in this cycle. The DSCC had raised 19.7% more than the NRSC ($44.4 million to $36.5 million), while the DCCC had raised 14.3% more than the NRCC ($89.1 million to $77.2 million).
 
Republicans lead in national committee fundraising. The Republican National Committee (RNC) raised $25.3 million and spent $23.1 million while the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised $9.0 million and spent $8.9 million. In the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 89.1% more than the DNC ($194.0 million to $74.5 million). The RNC’s 89.1% fundraising advantage is up from 88.2% in October and 83.0% in September.
 
At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential election cycle) the RNC had a smaller 54.3% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($89.3 million to $51.2 million).
 
So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 34.2% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($318.8 million to $225.6 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is up from 32.7% in October and 31.5% in September.
 


171 noteworthy endorsements issued in the Democratic presidential primary

The 17 candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for president have received a combined 171 noteworthy endorsements, according to review of a list of endorsements compiled by FiveThirtyEight through Nov. 20.
 
Noteworthy endorsers include current and former presidents and vice presidents, current and former party leaders, governors and other state executives, members of Congress, mayors of large cities, state legislative majority and minority leaders, and Democratic National Committee members.
 
Joe Biden (D) leads with 40 noteworthy endorsements, followed by Kamala Harris (D) with 33 and Bernie Sanders (I) with 23. Six noteworthy candidates (Tulsi Gabbard, Deval Patrick, Joe Sestak, Tom Steyer, Marianne Williamson, and Andrew Yang) have not received any noteworthy endorsements.
 
Out of 23 Democratic governors nationwide, six have endorsed a presidential candidate and one (Steve Bullock of Montana) is running for president. Joe Biden, Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, and Amy Klobuchar have each been endorsed by their home state’s governors. Biden was also endorsed by Govs. Ned Lamont (D-Conn.) and Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.)
 
Of the 47 members of the U.S. Senate Democratic caucus, 10 have endorsed a presidential candidate and six are running for president. Five senators have endorsed Joe Biden, more than any other candidate. Cory Booker, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren were each endorsed by their fellow home-state senator. Kamala Harris’ fellow California senator Dianne Feinstein endorsed Joe Biden, while Michael Bennet’s colleague Cory Gardner is a Republican.
 
Out of the 233 Democratic members of the U.S. House, 69 have endorsed a presidential candidate and one (Tulsi Gabbard) is running for president. Joe Biden has the most U.S. House endorsements with 19, followed by Kamala Harris with 15 and Cory Booker with 11.
 
Three candidates have noteworthy endorsements from an early voting state. Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller and Democratic National Committee member Jan Bauer endorsed Steve Bullock. Julián Castro was endorsed by Nevada Democratic National Committee member Allison Stephens. Elizabeth Warren was endorsed by Nevada state Controller Catherine Byrne, Nevada Democratic National Committee member Alex Goff, and Iowa state Treasurer Michael Fitzgerald.
 
 


Joe Biden leads in Ballotpedia pageviews for fourth consecutive week; Tom Steyer has largest week-over-week increase

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.
 
Joe Biden’s campaign page on Ballotpedia received 2,448 views for the week of November 10-16. Biden’s pageview figure represents 9.4% of the pageviews for the week. Andrew Yang had 8.7% of the pageviews for the week, followed by Elizabeth Warren with 8.4%. This is Biden’s fourth week in a row with the most pageviews.
 
Every Democratic candidate other than Tom Steyer had fewer pageviews last week than the week before. Steyer’s pageviews increased by 11.2%.
 
Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews this year with 141,319. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg with 133,702 and Joe Biden with 126,819.


Tobacco age increased to 21 in New York

The tobacco age restriction increased to 21 in New York Wednesday, making it the sixteenth state to increase its tobacco age to 21 in the 21st century. Hawaii was the first state to do so, enacting its increase in June 2015.
 
The first tobacco age limit in U.S. history was imposed in 1883 in New Jersey and set a minimum age of 16. By 1920, 14 states had a minimum tobacco age of 21. However, over the course of the 1920s and 1930s, many states with age restrictions over 21 lowered their tobacco age limit, often to 18. At the turn of the 21st century, three states (Alabama, Alaska, and Utah) had a tobacco age of 19 and the remaining 47 had a tobacco age of 18.
 
The increase means that there are now 16 states where the minimum age to purchase or use tobacco is 21, comprising 49% of the U.S. population. Three states have a tobacco age of 19 and the remaining 31 have a tobacco age of 18. The next state where a tobacco age increase will take effect is Washington, whose tobacco age will increase from 18 to 21 on January 1, 2020.
 
New York’s tobacco age increase was sponsored by Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal (D-Manhattan) and passed the state Assembly by a 120-26 vote. It was merged with a Senate bill sponsored by state Sen. Diane Savino (D-Staten Island), and passed that chamber by a 52-9 vote. Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) signed the bill into law on July 16, 2019.
 
New York is among eight states with a Democratic trifecta to pass a tobacco age increase. Four states passed a tobacco age increase under a Republican trifecta, and six passed a tobacco age increase under divided government. Nine Democratic governors, including Cuomo, and eight Republican governors have signed tobacco age increases into law.
 


Chesa Boudin wins San Francisco District Attorney election

Chesa Boudin defeated Suzy Loftus, Leif Dautch, and Nancy Tung in last Tuesday’s nonpartisan election for San Francisco District Attorney. Loftus conceded the race Saturday after mail-in ballots tallied over the course of the past week indicated Boudin would win.
 
Under San Francisco’s system of ranked-choice voting, voters select up to 10 candidates for each office on the ballot and rank their preferences. Votes are initially allocated to each voter’s first-place candidate. If no candidate wins a majority of the first-place vote, the candidate with the least votes is eliminated and their voters’ voters are reassigned to their next preferred candidate.
 
As of 7:30 a.m. PST on November 11, Boudin had won 35.7% of the first-place vote to Loftus’ 31.1%. A projection released by the city department of elections indicated that Dautch would be eliminated in the first round, followed by Tung in the second round. The report projected a Boudin victory over Loftus in the third round by a margin of 1.66 percentage points—2,825 votes.
 
This was the first open-seat election for San Francisco District Attorney since 1909. The race attracted national attention, with presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris issuing endorsements. Sanders endorsed Boudin while Harris, who held the office herself before winning election as California attorney general, endorsed Loftus.
 


Joe Biden leads in Ballotpedia pageviews for third consecutive week; Kamala Harris has largest week-over-week increase

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers show which candidates are getting our readers’ attention.
 
Joe Biden’s campaign page on Ballotpedia received 3,996 views for the week of November 3-9. Biden’s pageview figure represents 10.8% of the pageviews for the week. Elizabeth Warren had 9.7% of the pageviews for the week, followed by Bernie Sanders with 9.1%. This is Biden’s third week in a row with the most pageviews.
 
Every Democratic candidate had more pageviews last week than the week before. The three candidates with the largest week-over-week increases were Kamala Harris (61.7%), Joe Biden (51.4%), and Bernie Sanders (50.9%).
 
Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews this year with 139,064. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg with 131,612 and Joe Biden with 124,371.
 


San Francisco District Attorney election too close to call, Chesa Boudin leads in first-place selection

As of 7:45 a.m. PST Wednesday, the results of San Francisco’s district attorney election remained too close to call. With partial results reported from just under 100% of precincts, Chesa Boudin led with 32.9% of the first-choice vote, followed by Suzy Loftus with 30.8%, Nancy Tung with 20.7%, and Leif Dautch with 15.4%.
 
Under San Francisco’s system of ranked-choice voting, voters may select multiple candidates, ranking their preferences from among their options. If no candidate receives a majority of the vote, the last-place candidate is eliminated and their voters’ votes are allocated to their next preferred candidate. This process is repeated until one candidate has a majority. As of 6:00 a.m., second-, third-, and fourth-choice results were not available.
 
This was the first open-seat election for San Francisco District Attorney since 1909. The race attracted national attention, with presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris issuing endorsements. Sanders endorsed Boudin while Harris, who held the office herself before winning election as California attorney general, endorsed Loftus.


Working Families Party gains a seat on the Philadelphia City Council

The Working Families Party won an at-large seat on the Philadelphia City Council for the first time in city history, according to unofficial election returns early Wednesday morning.
 
All 17 seats on the Philadelphia city council were up for election Tuesday. Ten of those seats were elected by voters in the city’s 10 districts, while the remaining seven were elected by the entire city at-large. Each party may nominate only five candidates for the seven at-large seats, meaning that no one party can win every city council seat. Since Philadelphia’s charter was adopted in 1951, every city council election has resulted in Democrats winning five at-large seats and Republicans winning two.
 
The five Democratic candidates—incumbents Allan Domb, Derek Green, and Helen Gym and challengers Katherine Richardson and Isaiah Thomas—lead the at-large race with between 187,000 and 169,000 votes each. Working Families Party candidate Kendra Brooks followed with 55,600 votes, while incumbent Republican David Oh placed seventh with 49,700 votes.
 
Democrats led in nine of the 10 district races, with the closest margin being 20.5% in District 6. In District 10, incumbent Brian O’Neill (R) led by a margin of 9.6%. If all of these results hold, the Democratic Party will hold a 14-seat majority on the city council, with two seats held by Republicans and one by the Working Families Party.
 


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