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David Luchs

David Luchs is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

RNC outraises DNC by nearly two-to-one, Republican Hill committees outraise Democratic counterparts

The Republican National Committee (RNC) outraised the Democratic National Committee (DNC) by nearly two-to-one in April, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on May 20. The DNC had reported its best fundraising totals of the campaign cycle in March 2020, outraising the RNC for the first time since October 2018.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $11.5 million and spent $6.2 million last month, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $9.0 million and spent $5.0 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 8.8% more than the DSCC ($109.5 million to $100.3 million). The NRSC’s 8.8% fundraising advantage is up from 7.0% in April but down from 10.1% in March.

On the House side, the National Republican Campaign Committee (NRCC) raised $11.4 million and spent $8.0 million, while the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $11.3 million and spent $9.6 million. So far in the cycle, the DCCC has raised 27.8% more than the NRCC ($179.8 million to $135.9 million). The DCCC’s 27.8% fundraising advantage is down from 30.0% in April and 30.9% in March.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising, although their advantage in the House was smaller than in this cycle. The DSCC had raised 17.6% more than the NRSC ($76.3 million to $63.9 million), while the DCCC had raised 21.5% more than the NRCC ($150.9 million to $121.6 million).

Last month, the RNC raised $27.1 million and spent $27.0 million to the DNC’s $15.3 million in fundraising and $10.7 million in spending. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 72.4% more than the DNC ($345.7 million to $161.9 million). The RNC’s 72.4% fundraising advantage is down from 73.9% in April and 88.4% in March.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle), the RNC had a smaller 44.0% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($150.4 million to $96.2 million).

So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 28.9% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($591.1 million to $442.0 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is up from 28.4% in April but down from 35.0% in March.

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Biden outraised Trump in April, Trump continues to lead in overall fundraising and cash on hand

Joe Biden outraised Donald Trump by more than two-to-one last month, while Trump had a nearly two-to-one advantage in cash on hand, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on May 20.

The Biden campaign raised $43.6 million in April, 88% more than the Trump campaign’s $16.9 million. Biden’s campaign spent 50% more than Trump’s ($12.9 million to $7.7 million). As of April 30, the Trump campaign had 61% more cash on hand than the Biden campaign ($107.7 million to $57.1 million). Trump continues to lead Biden in overall fundraising since the beginning of 2017, having raised 38% more ($262.5 million to $178.4 million).

Biden’s campaign raised 6.6% less in April than it did in March ($43.6 million versus $46.7 million), while Trump’s raised 24.3% more ($16.9 million versus $13.6 million).

Trump’s $262.5 million in overall fundraising is the second-highest figure for any presidential candidate at this point in the past three elections. The only candidate that outraised Trump was Barack Obama (D), who had raised an inflation-adjusted $345.7 million as of May 2008. Trump’s cash-on-hand total of $107.7 million is also the second-highest during this time, bested only by Obama’s inflation-adjusted $132.4 million at this point in his re-election campaign.

Biden and Trump’s combined $441.0 million in fundraising is the second-highest combined total when compared to the past three election cycles. At this point in the 2008 campaign, Obama and John McCain (R) had raised a combined inflation-adjusted $473.2 million.

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Joe Biden outraises Donald Trump in March while Trump retains cash on hand advantage

Joe Biden outraised Donald Trump by more than three-to-one last month, while Trump had a nearly four-to-one advantage in cash on hand, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission Monday.

The Biden campaign raised $46.7 million in March, 110% more than the Trump campaign’s $13.6 million. Biden’s campaign spent 109% more than Trump’s ($32.5 million to $9.6 million). As of March 31, the Trump campaign had 115% more cash on hand than the Biden campaign ($98.5 million to $26.4 million). Trump continues to lead Biden in overall fundraising since the beginning of 2017, having raised 58% more ($245.6 million to $134.8 million).

Trump’s $245.6 million in overall fundraising is the second-highest figure for any presidential candidate at this point in the past three elections. The only candidate to have out-raised Trump was Barack Obama (D), who had raised an inflation-adjusted $305.1 million as of April 2008. Trump’s cash-on-hand figure is also the second-highest during this time, bested only by Obama’s inflation-adjusted $119.7 million at this point in his re-election campaign.

Biden and Trump’s combined $380.4 million in fundraising is the second-highest combined total when compared to the past three election cycles. At this point in the 2008 campaign, Obama and John McCain (R) had raised a combined inflation-adjusted $409.1 million.



DNC outraises RNC for the first time in the 2020 election cycle

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) outraised the Republican National Committee (RNC) for the first time since October 2018 last month, according to April 2020 campaign finance reports filed with the FEC Monday.

The DNC raised $32.7 million and spent $11.0 million to the RNC’s $24.0 million in fundraising and $23.8 million in spending. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 73.9% more than the DNC ($318.6 million to $146.7 million). The RNC’s 73.9% fundraising advantage is down from 88.4% in March and 89.8% in February.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle) the RNC had a smaller 44.5% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($137.9 million to $87.7 million).

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $11.0 million and spent $6.1 million last month, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $9.1 million and spent $6.9 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 7.0% more than the DSCC ($98.0 million to $91.3 million). The NRSC’s 7.0% fundraising advantage is down from 10.1% in March and 8.4% in February.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $14.3 million and spent $6.2 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $11.6 million and spent $7.9 million. So far in the cycle, the DCCC has raised 30.0% more than the NRCC ($168.4 million to $124.5 million). The DCCC’s 30.0% fundraising advantage is down from 30.9% in March and 33.4% in February.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising, although their advantage in the House was smaller than in this cycle. The DSCC had raised 20.8% more than the NRSC ($71.3 million to $57.9 million), while the DCCC had raised 18.4% more than the NRCC ($139.7 million to $116.2 million).

So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 28.4% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($541.0 million to $406.5 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is down from 35.0% in March and 35.3% in February.

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Wisconsin’s absentee ballot rejection rate averaged 1.14% for spring elections since 2012

Wisconsin voters went to the polls April 7 for the state’s annual spring election. This year, in addition to presidential primaries, a seat on the state Supreme Court and a ballot measure proposing an expansion of rights for victims of crime were on the ballot. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the deadline for voters to return absentee ballots was extended from April 7 to April 13. Reporting of results was also delayed to that date.

Voters requested 1.29 million absentee ballots, the most requests since at least 2012. Between 2012 and 2019, an average of 118,445 absentee ballots were sent out in each Wisconsin spring election. The year where the most ballots were sent was 2016 with 247,052. The year with the least was 2014 with 67,917. An average of 82% of ballots were received in time to be counted, ranging from 92.22% in 2016 to 74.10% in 2019.

Each year, less than 2% of absentee ballots were rejected. The year with the most rejections was 2016 with 1,629, while the year with the greatest percentage of rejections was 2012 with 1.81%. Across all eight spring elections, an average of 1.14% of those ballots completed on time were rejected.

For an absentee ballot to be valid, Wisconsin law requires that the voter sign a certificate enclosed in the ballot envelope. A witness must be present for completion of the ballot and is also required to provide their signature. A ballot which does not meet these requirements may be rejected. A ballot is not considered to have been rejected if it was not delivered to the voter on time or if it was not returned on time. An absentee ballot is considered to have been cancelled rather than rejected if a voter is ruled ineligible or votes in-person.



Trump has appointed second-most federal judges through April 1 of a president’s fourth year

Donald Trump has appointed and the Senate confirmed 193 Article III federal judges through April 1, 2020, his fourth year in office. This is the second-most Article III judicial appointments through this point in all presidencies since Jimmy Carter (D). The Senate had confirmed 207 of Carter’s appointees at this point in his term.

The average number of federal judges appointed by a president through April 1 of their fourth year in office is 168.

The median number of Supreme Court justices appointed is two. Along with President Trump, Presidents Barack Obama (D), Bill Clinton (D), and George H.W. Bush (R) had each appointed two Supreme Court justices at this point in their first terms. Ronald Reagan (R) had appointed one, while Carter and George W. Bush (R) had not appointed any.

The median number of United States Court of Appeals appointees is 30. Trump appointed the most with 51, while Reagan appointed the least with 25. Trump’s 51 appointments make up 28% of the total 179 judgeships across the courts of appeal.

The median number of United States District Court appointees is 138. Carter appointed the most with 157, and Reagan appointed the fewest with 103. Trump has appointed 138 district court judges so far. Those appointments make up 20% of the 677 judgeships across the district courts.

Article III federal judges are appointed for life terms by the president of the United States and confirmed by the U.S. Senate per Article III of the United States Constitution. Article III judges include judges on the: Supreme Court of the United States, U.S. courts of appeal, U.S. district courts, and the Court of International Trade.

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Four presidential candidates raised a combined $80 million in February

Bernie Sanders led presidential candidates in fundraising in February 2020, according to financial reports filed with the Federal Election Commission Friday. Sanders raised $47.7 million in February, while Joe Biden raised $18.1 million. On the Republican side, Donald Trump raised $14.2 million and Roque De La Fuente raised $50,000.

As of the February 29, 2020, reporting cutoff, Trump led the four presidential candidates in cash on hand with $94.4 million. Sanders followed with $18.7 million, while Biden had $12.1 million and De La Fuente $4.8 million.

President Trump’s $232 million in fundraising to date is 19.6% more than the inflation-adjusted $190 million President Barack Obama had raised at this point in his 2012 re-election campaign. According to Republican National Committee (RNC) finance reports filed Friday, Trump and the RNC have raised a combined $851 million. At this point in the 2012 election cycle, Obama and the Democratic National Committee had raised an inflation-adjusted $606 million.

Since the start of the election cycle, Biden and Sanders have raised a combined $270 million to Trump and De La Fuente’s combined $246 million. Biden and Sanders have a combined $30.8 million in cash on hand to Trump and De La Fuente’s $99.3 million. The four candidates have raised a cumulative $516 million since the beginning of the election.



RNC outraises DNC for tenth consecutive month, five other party committees report highest fundraising of the cycle

The Republican National Committee (RNC) outraised its Democratic counterpart by more than two-to-one for a tenth consecutive month. The RNC’s $26.2 million raised fell just short of the $27.3 million the group raised during September 2019.

Further, five of the six top party committees reported their largest per-month fundraising hauls of the cycle to date. Both updates come according to March 2020 campaign finance reports filed with the FEC Friday.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $11.2 million and spent $6.0 million last month, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $8.9 million and spent $8.7 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 10.1% more than the DSCC ($88.9 million to $80.4 million). The NRSC’s 10.1% fundraising advantage is up from 8.4% in February and 7.3% in January.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $17.1 million and spent $6.8 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $15.1 million and spent $6.8 million. So far in the cycle, the DCCC has raised 30.9% more than the NRCC ($154 million to $113 million). The DCCC’s 30.9% fundraising advantage is down from 33.4% in February and 37.8% in January.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising, although their advantage in the House was smaller than in this cycle. The DSCC had raised 23.0% more than the NRSC ($64.9 million to $51.5 million), while the DCCC had raised 17.1% more than the NRCC ($125 million to $106 million).

Republicans continue to lead in national committee fundraising, with the Republican National Committee (RNC) raising $26.2 million and spending $25.4 million while the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised $12.0 million and spent $7.8 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 88.4% more than the DNC ($295 million to $114 million). The RNC’s 88.4% fundraising advantage is down from 89.8% in February and 90.2% in January.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle), the RNC had a smaller 46.7% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($126 million to $78.5 million).

So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 35.0% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($496.3 million to $348.4 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is down from 35.3% in February but up from 34.1% in January.



Bernie Sanders wins Democrats Abroad primary

Sen. Bernie Sanders won the Democrats Abroad presidential primary, according to an official tally of results released Monday. Sanders received 57.9% of the vote to former Vice President Joe Biden’s 22.7%. The two were the only candidates to receive the 15% of the vote required to be allocated delegates at the Democratic National Convention. Sanders will receive nine of the group’s 13 delegates while Biden will receive the remaining four.

Democrats Abroad is the official international arm of the Democratic Party. Registered voters who live outside of the United States and did not participate in a state or territorial primary were eligible to cast a presidential vote with Democrats Abroad between March 3-10. The group does not cast electoral votes for president in the November general election.

Turnout was reported at 39,984 votes, the largest in Democrats Abroad history and a 15% increase from the turnout in 2016. Just under 15% of votes were cast from the United Kingdom (5,689), more than any other country. Germany followed with 5,268 votes, while Americans residing in Canada cast 4,691 votes. The primary reported votes from 180 countries.

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Biden, Trump outline coronavirus strategy in pair of addresses

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
March 24, 2020: Biden, Trump discuss coronavirus response. blank    blankblank   


Ballotpedia is monitoring changes made to election dates and procedures in response to the coronavirus pandemic.


Poll Spotlight


Notable Quote of the Day

“If you thought the battle over whether or not to impeach Trump would be the defining moment of the President’s first term in office (as we all did), well, things have changed.

This coronavirus fight is now the thing that very likely will make or break Trump’s chances at a second term this November. And it’s really a series of fights: There’s the obvious physical health one but there’s also a massive economic fight, a mental health battle and a leadership test all wrapped in there too.”

– Chris Cillizza, CNN editor-at-large

Democrats

  • Joe Biden delivered a televised address from his Delaware home in which he discussed Trump’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. Biden also said he would begin vetting at least six potential vice presidential nominees in the coming weeks. Also Monday, the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, the largest public-sector union nationwide, endorsed Biden.

  • Bernie Sanders won the Democrats Abroad primary, according to official vote totals released Monday. The primary was conducted March 3-10 and was open to all U.S. citizens living abroad who did not vote in a state or territorial primary. Sanders won 58% of the vote and nine of the group’s delegates. Biden won 22% and the remaining four delegates.

Republicans

  • In his daily press briefing, Donald Trump said that the coronavirus pandemic looked as if it would get worse before getting better. Trump said that the country was not built to sustain a prolonged shutdown and that he would soon consider whether it was time to lift restrictions on business.

Flashback: March 24, 2016

The Los Angeles Times published an interview with Bernie Sanders in which he stated that he planned on making the case to the party’s superdelegates that he was the stronger candidate than Hillary Clinton.blank

Click here to learn more.



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