Author

Ellen Morrissey

Ellen Morrissey is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Incumbent Yvette Herrell (R), Gabriel Vasquez (D), and write-in Eliseo Luna (D) running for New Mexico’s 2nd Congressional District

Incumbent Yvette Herrell (R), Gabriel Vasquez (D), and write-in Eliseo Luna (D) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New Mexico’s 2nd Congressional District.

The Las Cruces Sun News’ Michael McDevitt wrote, “While CD2 has traditionally been a red seat, it’s been marked as a likelier Democratic district by the Cook Political Report following redistricting last year. Under New Mexico’s redrawn district map, which follows the 2020 U.S. Census, the district dominates the southwestern corner of the state.”

Herrell was first elected to Congress in 2020, defeating then-incumbent Xochitl Torres Small (D) 54% to 46%. Before being elected to Congress, Herrell served in the New Mexico House of Representatives from 2011 to 2018. In a campaign ad, Herrell said, “Costs and crime are rising, so I’m fighting to stop Biden’s out-of-control inflation, secure our border, and make our neighborhoods safer.”

Vasquez currently works as director of strategy and partnerships at HECHO (Hispanics Enjoying Camping, Hunting, and the Outdoors), a program sponsored by the National Wildlife Federation. He previously served as a Las Cruces city councilor from 2017 to 2021. In a campaign ad, Vasquez said “To protect a woman’s right to choose, lower costs for families, and give New Mexico what it deserves, I’ll stand up to any party leader.”

Both the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) have selected their candidates in this race to be part of their respective Red to Blue and Patriot funding and support programs.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of September 20, 2022, Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of six districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 51.9% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 46.1%.



Five party committees report largest spending numbers of 2022 election cycle in August

Six party committees have raised a combined $1.4 billion thus far in the 2022 election cycle. In August, the committees raised $84 million, according to recent filings with the Federal Election Commission. 

The Republican National Committee (RNC), Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC), National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC), Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), and National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) all reported their highest disbursement numbers of the cycle in August.

In August, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $12.6 million and spent $20.9 million, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $12.6 million and spent $19.8 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the NRSC has outraised the DSCC with $194.1 million in receipts to the DSCC’s $184.8 million. At this point in the 2020 election cycle, the NRSC led in cumulative fundraising with $167.7 million to the DSCC’s $165.2 million. 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $15.5 million and spent $23.6 million in August. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $15.6 million and spent $12.5 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DCCC leads in fundraising with $268.4 million to the NRCC’s $240.5 million. At this point in the 2020 cycle, the DCCC had raised $248.8 million and the NRCC had raised $191.0 million.

Between the national committees, the Republican National Committee (RNC) raised and spent more than the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in August. The RNC raised $17.2 million and spent $26.6 million, while the DNC raised $10.9 million and spent $14.5 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the RNC has raised $276.4 million to the DNC’s $244.4 million. At this time in the 2020 election cycle, the RNC led in fundraising by a larger margin, with $532.7 million in cumulative receipts to the DNC’s $281.0 million.

This election cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 1.9% more than the  DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($711.1 million to $697.7 million). The Republican committees’ fundraising advantage is up from 1.1% last month.

Additional reading:



President Joe Biden’s approval rating rises to 42%, highest since May

Image of the south facade of the White House.

Polling averages at the end of August showed President Joe Biden (D) at 42% approval, the highest rating he’s received since May. Fifty-four percent of voters disapprove of his performance.

Biden last had a 42% approval rating on May 19, 2022. The lowest approval rating he’s received is 38%, last seen on July 27, 2022. The highest approval rating Biden has received is 55%, last seen on May 26, 2021.

Congress was at 21% approval and 56% disapproval at the end of August. The highest approval rating Congress has received is 36%, last seen on July 16, 2021, and the lowest approval rating it has received is 14%, last seen on January 26, 2022.

At the same time in 2018, President Donald Trump’s (R) approval was one percentage point higher at 43%, and congressional approval was three points lower at 19%.

Ballotpedia’s polling index takes the average of polls conducted over the last thirty days to calculate presidential and congressional approval ratings. We average the results and show all polling results side-by-side because we believe that paints a clearer picture of public opinion than any individual poll can provide. The data is updated daily as new polling results are published.



Tina Kotek (D), Christine Drazan (R), and Betsy Johnson (I) lead field in Oregon gubernatorial race

Tina Kotek (D), Christine Drazan (R), Betsy Johnson (I), and R. Leon Noble (L) are running in the Oregon gubernatorial election on November 8, 2022. Incumbent Governor Kate Brown (D) is term-limited and cannot run for re-election.

Kotek, Drazan, and Johnson have led the field in fundraising and media coverage. Kotek is the former speaker of the Oregon House of Representatives, Drazan is the former Oregon House minority leader, and Johnson is a former Oregon state senator. Johnson served in the state senate as a Democrat.

Kyle Kondik of Sabato’s Crystal Ball wrote, “the state is hosting an unusual 3-way race among a trio of women who are all recent members of the state legislature. […] The race sets up an unusual situation where the winner may not need to crack even 40%.”

Writing about the July 29 gubernatorial debate, Oregon Public Broadcasting’s Dirk VanderHart said the candidates, “attempted to stake out the political lanes they hope to ride to victory in November: Kotek as the accomplished progressive, Johnson as the centrist unifier, and Drazan as the change agent for a state that has […] one-party control.”

In 2018, Brown won re-election against Knute Buehler (R) 50% to 44%. President Joe Biden (D) won the 2020 presidential vote in Oregon with 57% to Donald Trump’s (R) 40%. In 2020, Oregon held three statewide executive elections for secretary of state, treasurer, and attorney general. Democratic candidates won each of these races by at least percentage 7 points.

Oregon has had a Democratic governor since 1987. Oregon’s most recent Republican governor was Victor G. Atiyeh, who served from 1979 to 1987. Since Oregon became a state in 1859, only one third-party or independent candidate has been elected governor: Julius L. Meier (I), who served from 1931 to 1935.

This is one of 36 gubernatorial elections taking place in 2022. The governor serves as a state’s top executive official and is the only executive office that is elected in all 50 states. There are currently 28 Republican governors and 22 Democratic governors.

Oregon has a Democratic trifecta. A state government trifecta refers to a situation where one party controls a state’s governorship and majorities in both chambers of the state legislature.

As of August 29, 2022, there are 23 Republican trifectas, 14 Democratic trifectas, and 13 divided governments where neither party holds trifecta control.



Langworthy defeats Paladino in New York’s 23rd Congressional District Republican primary

Nicholas Langworthy defeated Carl Paladino in New York’s 23rd Congressional District Republican primary on August 23, 2022. 

The Buffalo News’ Robert J. McCarthy said Langworthy and Paladino’s presence in the primary “[was] expected to result in a lively race, pitting against each other two well-known conservatives and allies of former President Donald Trump in an overwhelmingly Republican and pro-Trump district.”

Langworthy is the chairman of the New York Republican Party. He also worked as an executive committee member for Donald Trump’s (R) 2016 presidential transition. Langworthy received endorsements from the House Conservatives Fund and its chairman, Rep. Jim Banks (R-Ind.). Banks said, “Nick is a true conservative who will be on the front lines fighting back against the radical policies of Nancy Pelosi and Joe Biden. Nick will put American workers and families first and he is ready to hit the ground running on Day One.”

The Elmira Star-Gazette’s Chris Potter wrote that the district’s “new borders [after redistricting] include Allegany, Steuben, Chemung, Schuyler, Chautauqua and Cattaraugus counties, plus a large part of Erie County.” According to data from Daily Kos, 58% of New York’s new 23rd District population came from the old 23rd District, 36% came from the old 27th District, and 6% came from the old 26th District.



DCCC reports its highest spending numbers of the 2022 election cycle according to Federal Election Commission filings

DCCC reports its highest spending numbers of the 2022 election cycle according to Federal Election Commission filings.

Six party committees have raised a combined $1.3 billion thus far in the 2022 election cycle. In July, the committees raised $64 million, according to recent filings with the Federal Election Commission. 

In July, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $10.1 million and spent $9.5 million, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $8.1 million and spent $13.3 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the NRSC has outraised the DSCC with $181.5 million in receipts to the DSCC’s $172.2 million. At this point in the 2020 election cycle, the NRSC led in cumulative fundraising with $148.7 million to the DSCC’s $138.3 million. 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $13.5 million and spent $16.2 million in July, their highest spending numbers of the cycle. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $9.8 million and spent $8.6 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DCCC leads in fundraising with $252.9 million to the NRCC’s $224.9 million. At this point in the 2020 cycle, the DCCC had raised $226.1 million and the NRCC had raised $173.7 million.

Between the national committees, the Republican National Committee (RNC) raised and spent more than the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in July. The RNC raised $11.8 million and spent $15.7 million, while the DNC raised $10.7 million and spent $10.1 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the RNC has raised $259.2 million to the DNC’s $233.5 million. At this time in the 2020 election cycle, the RNC led in fundraising by a larger margin, with $465.1 million in cumulative receipts to the DNC’s $202.5 million.

This election cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 1.1% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($665.7 million to $658.7 million). The Republican committees’ fundraising advantage is down from 1.8% last month.

Additional reading:



Harris at 26 tie-breaking votes in the U.S. Senate, most ever cast in a single term

Vice President Kamala Harris (D) cast three tie-breaking votes in the U.S. Senate related to the Inflation Reduction Act. On August 6, she cast a vote to proceed with debate on the bill, and on August 7 she cast votes to approve an amendment and to pass the bill.

During her tenure, Harris has also cast 20 tie-breaking votes related to confirmations and three related to the American Rescue Plan, bringing her total to 26.

Harris has cast the most tie-breaking votes in the Senate during a single vice presidential term in American history. Harris is followed by John Adams, who cast 20 tie-breaking votes during his first vice presidential term, and George M. Dallas, who cast 19 tie-breaking votes during his one term in office.

Accounting for a vice president’s full tenure, Harris has cast the third most tie-breaking votes. The most were cast by John C. Calhoun (31), and the second most by John Adams (29).

Among vice presidents who have held office since 1981, Harris is followed by Mike Pence (R) at 13 tie-breaking votes, Dick Cheney (R) at 8, and George H.W. Bush (R) at 7. 

Under Article I, Section 3, Clause 4 of the U.S. Constitution, the vice president of the United States also serves as the president of the Senate. In this capacity, he or she may cast the deciding vote when there is a tie in the Senate. 



Both candidates in the election for Washington’s 3rd Congressional district complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Washington’s 3rd Congressional District —Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez (D) and Joe Kent (R)—completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of August 10, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Washington’s current congressional delegation consists of 7 Democrats and 3 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What do you perceive to be the United States’ greatest challenges as a nation over the next decade?

Gluesenkamp Pérez:

“Money in politics. Love of money is the root of all evil and we cannot address our biggest threats like climate change or a disappearing middle class without having political leaders who are honest dealers that put the interest of their constituents above high-dollar donors.”

Kent:

“We have to break away from the failed economic policies and national security strategies that have only benefited the ruling class and China. We must fully audit the 2020 Presidential Election to restore the American people’s faith in our democratic system. We have to return critical industries and manufacturing back to America, restore energy independence, and end our wasteful post 9/11 wars.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Want to see Candidate Connection continue to grow in future elections? Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



John Fetterman, Mehmet Oz, and six other candidates running for Senate in Pennsylvania

John Fetterman (R), Mehmet Oz (R), and six other candidates are running in Pennsylvania’s U.S. Senate election on November 8, 2022. Incumbent Senator Pat Toomey (R) is not seeking re-election.

CBS News‘ Sarah Ewall-Wice wrote, “The Senate race in Pennsylvania is a crucial battleground for both parties fighting over who will control the Senate after the November elections. Democrats see it as a possible pickup, with GOP Senator Pat Toomey retiring.” The Cook Political Report‘s Amy Gutman wrote, “Republicans will have the favorable political environment on their side.”

In Pennsylvania’s 2018 senate race, incumbent Bob Casey Jr. (D) defeated Lou Barletta (R) 55.7% to 42.6%. In 2016, Toomey won re-election against Katie McGinty (D) 48.8% to 47.3%. Top candidates in the two most recent presidential elections in Pennsylvania were separated by less than 2 percentage points. Pennsylvania is one of two states in 2022, along with Wisconsin, where Republicans are defending a seat in a state that Joe Biden (D) won in 2020.

Fetterman serves as Pennsylvania’s lieutenant governor. In 2018, he was elected 57.8% to 40.7% on a joint ticket with incumbent Governor Tom Wolf (D). This race marks Oz’s first run for political office. Oz is a retired surgeon and hosted The Dr. Oz Show from 2009 to 2022.

Minor party, independent, and write-in candidates include Ronald Johnson (Constitution Party), Richard Weiss (G), Daniel Wassmer (Keystone Party of Pennsylvania), Erik Gerhardt (L), Quincy Magee (Independent), and Everett Stern (Independent).

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. Senate. Thirty-five of 100 seats were up for election, including one special election. Democrats have an effective majority, with the chamber split 50-50 and Vice President Kamala Harris (D) having the tie-breaking vote. Fourteen seats held by Democrats and 21 seats held by Republicans are up for election in 2022. Republicans are defending two Senate seats in states Joe Biden (D) won in the 2020 presidential election: Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Democrats are not defending any Senate seats in states Donald Trump (R) won in 2020.



President Joe Biden’s approval rating remains at 39%, according to recent polling averages

Recent approval polling averages show President Joe Biden (D) at 39% approval, the same rating he received at the end of June. Fifty-six percent of voters disapprove of his performance.

Biden first received this rating on June 29. In July, approval for his presidency hit a new low of 38%, which he last received on July 27. The highest approval rating Biden has received is 55%, last seen on May 26, 2021.

Congress was at 16% approval and 71% disapproval at the end of July. At this time in June, its approval rating was 18%. The highest approval rating Congress has received is 36%, last seen on July 16, 2021, and the lowest approval rating it has received is 14%, last seen on January 26, 2022.

At the end of July 2018, President Donald Trump’s (R) approval was four percentage points higher than Biden’s at 43%, and congressional approval was two points lower at 16%.

Ballotpedia’s polling index takes the average of polls conducted over the last thirty days to calculate presidential and congressional approval ratings. We average the results and show all polling results side-by-side because we believe that paints a clearer picture of public opinion than any individual poll can provide. The data is updated daily as new polling results are published.