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Ellen Morrissey

Ellen Morrissey is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Nine candidates running in Los Angeles’ mayoral primary election

Nine candidates are running in the June 7, 2022, primary for mayor of Los Angeles, California. Incumbent Mayor Eric Garcetti (D) could not run for re-election due to term limits.

Karen Bass (D) and Rick Caruso (D) have led the field in media coverage and fundraising. Though the election is officially nonpartisan, both candidates are registered Democrats. Caruso announced he changed his party registration from no party preference to Democrat in January 2022. Bass has held elected office as a Democrat since 2005.

Bass was first elected to public office in 2004 to serve in the California State Assembly. She served in the Assembly from 2005 to 2010 and was speaker from 2008 to 2010. Bass was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2012 and currently represents California’s 37th Congressional District. In a campaign ad, Bass said, “I’m running for mayor to meet today’s challenges: crime, homelessness, and the soaring cost of housing.”

Caruso is the founder and chief executive officer of a retail complex development company. He has also served on Los Angeles’ Department of Water and Power Commission, as the president of Los Angeles’ Police Commission, and on the USC Board of Trustees. In a campaign ad, Caruso said, “I’m running for mayor because the city we love is in a state of emergency: rampant homelessness, people living in fear for their safety, and politicians at city hall just in it for themselves.”

Public safety has been a top issue in the race. A Caruso campaign ad said, “As Police Commission president, [Caruso] took on city hall politicians and cut crime 30%. As mayor, Caruso won’t defund the police. He’ll invest in making L.A. safer with 1,500 new officers, increase youth crime prevention, and crack down on illegal guns and retail theft.” 

Bass said she would hire police officers and civilian workers in police departments to add at least 250 officers to patrol, invest in programs to address causes of crime, and establish an Office of Community Safety “to develop a neighborhood-specific strategy to re-envision public safety, and ensure that the needs of individual communities are met.”

Craig Greiwe, Alex Gruenenfelder, John Jackson, Andrew Kim, Gina Viola, Mel Wilson, and Kevin de León are also running in the primary. Joe Buscaino unofficially withdrew from the race on May 12 and endorsed Caruso, Mike Feuer unofficially withdrew on May 17 and endorsed Bass, and Ramit Varma unofficially withdrew on May 23 and endorsed Caruso. Buscaino, Feuer, and Varma will still appear on the primary ballot.

A candidate can win the election outright with more than 50% of the vote in the primary. If no candidate meets that threshold, the top two vote-getters will advance to a November 8 general election. Since 1933, every open election for Los Angeles mayor has advanced to a general election. Heading into the election, the last time a candidate won an open election for mayor outright in the primary was in 1929. 

This is the first even-year election for Los Angeles mayor since the 2015 passage of Charter Amendment 1, which shifted city elections to even-numbered years beginning in 2020.



Alabama Governor Kay Ivey (R) avoids runoff, defeating eight challengers in Republican primary

Alabama Governor Kay Ivey (R) avoids runoff, defeating eight challengers in Republican primary

Incumbent Kay Ivey (R) defeated eight candidates in Alabama’s Republican gubernatorial primary on May 24, 2022. She led the field with 55% of the vote, followed by Lynda Blanchard (R) at 19%, and Tim James (R) at 16%. No other candidate received more than 10% of the vote.

A candidate needed to win the primary with over 50% of the vote to advance to the general election.

Ivey was first elected governor in 2018, defeating Walt Maddox (D) 60% to 40%. Before becoming governor, Ivey served as lieutenant governor from 2011 to 2017, and as state treasurer from 2003 to 2011. In a campaign ad, Ivey highlighted her record, saying, “There’s no critical race theory in our schools, I signed the strongest pro-life law in America, I stood with Trump to ensure no election here can ever be stolen, and we created thousands of new jobs.”

Ivey, Blanchard, and James led the field in fundraising and media coverage. Lew Burdette (R), Stacy George (R), Donald Jones (R), Dean Odle (R), Dave Thomas (R), and Dean Young (R) also ran in the primary.

Gas prices in the state were a key issue in the race. Alabama approved a state gas tax increase of 10 cents per gallon in 2019, with the possibility of increases up to one cent every two years. Revenue from the tax was directed toward road and bridge construction. Blanchard said, “we have struggling families and business while our state sits on a surplus and spends enough money to make a drunken sailor blush,” and supported temporarily suspending state taxes on gas. James said, “every time I turn around, every day, I see an announcement about the governor handing out more money to these pet projects,” and said he supported repealing the 2019 increase. Ivey said there were other factors affecting gas prices, saying, “Let’s not lose sight of the main problem here, and that’s Joe Biden’s policies. He’s got inflation at a 40-year record high.”

Heading into the election, a Republican had held the Alabama governorship since the 2002 elections, which was also the last time an incumbent governor was defeated in the state.



Nine candidates running in Los Angeles’ mayoral primary election

Nine candidates are running in the June 7, 2022, primary for mayor of Los Angeles, California. Incumbent Mayor Eric Garcetti (D) could not run for re-election due to term limits.

Karen Bass (D) and Rick Caruso (D) have led the field in media coverage and fundraising. Though the election is officially nonpartisan, both candidates are registered Democrats. Caruso announced he changed his party registration from no party preference to Democrat in January 2022. Bass has held elected office as a Democrat since 2005.

Bass was first elected to public office in 2004 to serve in the California State Assembly. She served in the Assembly from 2005 to 2010 and was speaker from 2008 to 2010. Bass was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2012 and currently represents California’s 37th Congressional District. In a campaign ad, Bass said, “I’m running for mayor to meet today’s challenges: crime, homelessness, and the soaring cost of housing.”

Caruso is the founder and chief executive officer of a retail complex development company. He has also served on Los Angeles’ Department of Water and Power Commission, as the president of Los Angeles’ Police Commission, and on the USC Board of Trustees. In a campaign ad, Caruso said, “I’m running for mayor because the city we love is in a state of emergency: rampant homelessness, people living in fear for their safety, and politicians at city hall just in it for themselves.”

Public safety has been a top issue in the race. A Caruso campaign ad said, “As Police Commission president, [Caruso] took on city hall politicians and cut crime 30%. As mayor, Caruso won’t defund the police. He’ll invest in making L.A. safer with 1,500 new officers, increase youth crime prevention, and crack down on illegal guns and retail theft.” 

Bass said she would hire police officers and civilian workers in police departments to add at least 250 officers to patrol, invest in programs to address causes of crime, and establish an Office of Community Safety “to develop a neighborhood-specific strategy to re-envision public safety, and ensure that the needs of individual communities are met.”

Craig Greiwe, Alex Gruenenfelder, John Jackson, Andrew Kim, Gina Viola, Mel Wilson, and Kevin de León are also running in the primary. Joe Buscaino unofficially withdrew from the race on May 12 and endorsed Caruso, Mike Feuer unofficially withdrew on May 17 and endorsed Bass, and Ramit Varma unofficially withdrew on May 23 and endorsed Caruso. Buscaino, Feuer, and Varma will still appear on the primary ballot.

A candidate can win the election outright with more than 50% of the vote in the primary. If no candidate meets that threshold, the top two vote-getters will advance to a November 8 general election. Since 1933, every open election for Los Angeles mayor has advanced to a general election. Heading into the election, the last time a candidate won an open election for mayor outright in the primary was in 1929. 

This is the first even-year election for Los Angeles mayor since the 2015 passage of Charter Amendment 1, which shifted city elections to even-numbered years beginning in 2020.



Six party committees raised $60 million in April according to recent FEC reports

Six major political party committees raised a combined $1.1 billion in the first sixteen months of the 2022 election cycle. In April, the committees raised $60 million, according to recent filings with the Federal Election Commission. 

In April, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $8.3 million and spent $6.0 million, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $8.1 million and spent $7.2 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the NRSC has outraised the DSCC with $156.0 million in receipts to the DSCC’s $137.7 million. At this point in the 2020 election cycle, the NRSC led in cumulative fundraising with $109.5 million to the DSCC’s $100.3 million. 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $11.9 million and spent $10.2 million in April, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $8.7 million and spent $6.9 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DCCC leads in fundraising with $210.7 million to the NRCC’s $189.6 million. At this point in the 2020 cycle, the DCCC had raised $179.8 million and the NRCC had raised $112.9 million.

Between the national committees, the Republican National Committee (RNC) raised and spent more than the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in April. The RNC raised $14.2 million and spent $15.5 million, while the DNC raised $8.8 million and spent $11.1 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the RNC has raised $219.9 million to the DNC’s $195.5 million. At this time in the 2020 election cycle, the RNC led in fundraising by a larger margin, with $345.7 million in cumulative receipts to the DNC’s $161.9 million.

This election cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 3.9% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($565.5 million to $543.8 million). The Republican committees’ fundraising advantage was at 3.7% last month.

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New York court adopts new congressional, state senate maps

New York enacted new congressional and state senate districts on May 20, 2022, when Justice Patrick McAllister ordered the adoption of maps drawn by redistricting special master Jonathan Cervas. New York was apportioned 26 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives after the 2020 census, one fewer than it received after the 2010 census. These maps will take effect for New York’s 2022 congressional and state legislative elections.

McAllister overturned New York’s state senate and congressional maps on March 31, 2022. Gov. Kathy Hochul (D) signed the initial maps into law on February 3, 2022.

McAllister wrote in his May 20 order, “​​the court believes the maps remain almost perfectly neutral, meaning the maps do not favor or disfavor any political party.” 

Susan Lerner, the executive director of Common Cause New York, said, “It’s clear he listened to the extensive comments sent to the court, including ours and those of the Unity Maps, as the maps now reflect a deeper understanding of minority and other communities’ interests. Ultimately, as he indicates, he valued compactness above all else.”

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) criticized the congressional map, saying, “the court of appeals was wrong in the decision that they made both on the substance and in terms of turning over redistricting to an out of town, unelected special master and a judicial overseer in Steuben County, who was a Republican.” Rep. Jamaal Bowman (D-N.Y.) also criticized the map, saying “by splitting [Black] communities, the map further alienates them and perpetuates the opportunity for further historical neglect by the electoral system. […] Their voting power is directly tied to their lives and they deserve a fair chance at electing representatives that take their unique needs into full consideration.”

As of May 20, 2022, 41 states have adopted congressional district maps. One state’s maps have been overturned by court action and two states have not yet adopted congressional redistricting plans after the 2020 census. Six states were apportioned one U.S. House district, so no congressional redistricting is required. As of May 20, 2012, 42 states had enacted congressional redistricting plans after the 2010 census.

Forty-seven states have adopted legislative district maps for both chambers. A court in one state has overturned previously enacted maps, a court in one state has overturned a map for one chamber, and one state has not yet adopted legislative redistricting plans after the 2020 census. As of May 20, 2012, 46 states had enacted congressional redistricting plans.

Nationwide, legislative redistricting has been completed for 1,870 of 1,973 state Senate seats (94.8%) and 5,214 of 5,413 state House seats (96.3%). Congressional redistricting has been completed for 398 of the 435 seats (91.5%) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

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Wiley Nickel defeats four other candidates in North Carolina’s 13 District Democratic primary

Wiley Nickel defeats four other candidates in North Carolina’s 13th District Democratic primary

Wiley Nickel won the May 17 Democratic primary for North Carolina’s 13th Congressional District. Five candidates were on the ballot. Incumbent Rep. Ted Budd (R) announced on April 28, 2021, that he would not seek re-election and instead run for U.S. Senate.

Nickel had served in the North Carolina State Senate representing District 16 since 2019. He also worked as a criminal defense attorney. Before his election to public office, Nickel worked in several district attorney offices and in the White House as advance staff for former President Barack Obama (D). Nickel described his candidacy, saying, “I’ve seen the power of a nation’s hope. I’ve also seen the hard work it takes to make real change. I’m proud to be running on my strong record of work on climate solutions, wealth inequality, and human rights as a North Carolina State Senator.”

Jamie Campbell Bowles (D), Nathan Click (D), Denton Lee (D), Sam Searcy (D) also ran.

The district lines of North Carolina’s 13th changed substantially after redistricting, with the new district containing none of the old 13th district. According to FiveThirtyEight, the old 13th district had an R+38 lean, while the new district has an R+3 lean.

The News & Observer’s Danielle Battaglia described the new district, saying, “Only one district of North Carolina’s congressional map is a swing district, one that’s considered viable for either a Republican or Democrat to win. It’s the 13th Congressional District, and it encompasses all of Johnston County, the southern portion of Wake County, and parts of Harnett and Wayne counties.”

Nickel will face Bo Hines (R) in the November general election. As of May 2022, three independent outlets rated the 2022 general election as a Toss-up.



New Hampshire enacts new state senate map

New Hampshire enacted new state senate districts on May 6, 2022, when Gov. Chris Sununu (R) signed a proposal that both legislative chambers approved into law. The maps will take effect for New Hampshire’s 2022 state legislative elections.

On February 16, the New Hampshire Senate passed a map in a 14-10 vote, which the House then approved on April 21 in a 172-149 vote. The Senate Redistricting Committee initially advanced the proposal on January 5, 2022.

As of May 6, 46 states have adopted legislative district maps for both chambers. Legislative boundaries in Kansas are awaiting approval by that state’s supreme court. A court in Ohio has overturned previously enacted maps, a court in New York has overturned a map for one chamber, and Montana has not yet adopted legislative redistricting plans after the 2020 census.

As of May 6, 2012, 46 states had enacted legislative redistricting plans after the 2010 census.

Nationwide, states have completed legislative redistricting for 1,827 of 1,972 state Senate seats (92.6%) and 5,214 of 5,411 state House seats (96.3%).

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Five candidates running in the Georgia Republican gubernatorial primary

Five candidates are running in the Republican primary for governor of Georgia on May 24, 2022. Two candidates—incumbent Brian Kemp and David Perdue—have led the field in fundraising and media coverage. A candidate must receive more than 50% of the vote to advance to the general election. If no candidate wins the majority, a runoff election will take place on June 21 between the top two vote-getters.

Kemp was elected governor in 2018 when he defeated Stacey Abrams (D) 50% to 48%. Before that, he served as Georgia’s secretary of state from 2010 to 2018 and in the Georgia State Senate from 2003 to 2007. In a debate, Kemp said, “Every day that I’ve been in office, I’ve been putting hardworking Georgians first, ahead of the status quo and the politically correct. And I’m going to continue to do that the rest of my tenure.” 

Perdue served in the U.S. Senate from 2015 to 2021. He lost a 2021 runoff election to Jon Ossoff (D) 50% to 49%. He works as a founding partner of Perdue Partners, a global trading company. In a debate, Perdue said, “I think the decision in this race is very simple. Our governor failed us, he sold us out, and he’s divided us. I just don’t think he can win.” Former President Donald Trump (R) endorsed Perdue.

The 2020 election results have been a subject of debate among the candidates. During an April 24 debate, Perdue said Kemp did not do enough to investigate election fraud claims, saying, “[Kemp] would not stop the consent decree that was signed, he would not give us a special session. And this past year he’s not investigated anything. […] If he were a Democrat, even his strongest supporters would be calling this a gross corrupt cover-up.” Kemp responded, saying, “The investigative authority per the laws and the constitution of this state in 2020 lies with the secretary of state’s office and the state elections board. Now, we have had things that have been given to our office that we’ve looked into and when we thought they had merit we referred them to the proper authorities to investigate.”

Catherine Davis, Kandiss Taylor, and Tom Williams are also running in the primary.

A Republican has held Georgia’s governorship since the 2002 elections, which was also the last time an incumbent governor lost in the state. As of May 2022, The Cook Political Report and Larry J. Sabato’s Crystal Ball rated the 2022 general election as a toss-up. Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales rated the race as Tilt Republican.



Nine candidates, including incumbent, running in Republican primary for governor of Alabama

Nine candidates are running in the Republican primary election for governor of Alabama on May 24, 2022. Three candidates—incumbent Kay Ivey (R), Lynda Blanchard (R), and Tim James (R)—have led the field in fundraising and media coverage.

Ivey was first elected governor in 2018, defeating Walt Maddox (D) 60% to 40%. Before becoming governor, she served as lieutenant governor from 2011 to 2017 and as state treasurer from 2003 to 2011. In a campaign ad, Ivey highlighted her record, saying, “There’s no critical race theory in our schools, I signed the strongest pro-life law in America, I stood with Trump to ensure no election here can ever be stolen, and we created thousands of new jobs.”

Blanchard worked in real estate and founded an international nonprofit that aimed to address poverty. In 2019, Blanchard President Donald Trump (R) appointed Blanchard as the ambassador to Slovenia. In a campaign ad, Blanchard said, “I will use my business experience to create jobs, end vaccine and mask mandates, improve our schools, and restore election security.”

James is a businessman working as the president of Tim James Inc., a company that uses private investments to build bridges, roads, and other types of infrastructure. He has worked in the construction, transportation, and finance industries. In a campaign ad, James said, “[The left] think America is racist. They think our founding fathers were wrong. They think there are 50 genders, and they want to teach this to our children. […] It is time to fight back.”

Gas prices have been a subject of debate among the candidates. Alabama approved a state gas tax increase of 10 cents per gallon in 2019, with the possibility of increases up to one cent every two years. Revenue from the tax was directed toward road and bridge construction. Blanchard said, “we have struggling families and business while our state sits on a surplus and spends enough money to make a drunken sailor blush,” and supported temporarily suspending state taxes on gas. James said, “every time I turn around, every day, I see an announcement about the governor handing out more money to these pet projects,” and said he supported repealing the 2019 increase. Ivey said there were other factors behind high gas prices, saying, “Let’s not lose sight of the main problem here, and that’s Joe Biden’s policies. He’s got inflation at a 40-year record high.”

Lew Burdette (R), Stacy George (R), Donald Jones (R), Dean Odle (R), Dave Thomas (R), and Dean Young (R) are also running in the primary.

A Republican has held the Alabama governorship since the 2002 elections, which was also the last time an incumbent governor lost election in the state. 



Florida enacts new congressional map

Florida enacted new congressional districts on April 22, 2022, when Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) signed a proposal approved by the legislature into law. Florida was apportioned 28 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives after the 2020 census, one more than it received after the 2010 census. This map will take effect for Florida’s 2022 congressional elections.

On April 20, the Florida Senate passed a map in a 24-15 vote, which the House then approved on April 21 in a 68-34 vote. 

This was the second congressional map bill approved that the state legislature approved. DeSantis vetoed the first on March 29. Republican leaders in the legislature said on April 11 that they would wait to receive a map from DeSantis to support. DeSantis submitted a map to the legislature on April 13, which the legislature passed.

Florida Politics’s Jacob Ogles wrote of the enacted map, “The most controversial change DeSantis made in his map, this new CD 4 really stands in as the replacement to the Lawson seat. […] The Black population in Jacksonville gets cleaved in half by the St. Johns River after DeSantis vetoed a map drawn by the Florida House that created a Duval-only Black seat.” When DeSantis vetoed the initial map bill, he wrote in a memo, “Congressional District 5 [Lawson’s district] in both the primary and secondary maps enacted by the Legislature violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution because it assigns voters primarily on the basis of race but is not narrowly tailored to achieve a compelling state interest.”

State Rep. Tracie Davis (D) criticized the enacted map saying, “You hate when we use the word disenfranchisement. You turn your back. You look the other way. But you have to realize that is exactly what this is: Gutting, now-CD 4 … leaves us simply without representation. It simply means that the Black population in Florida that lives north of the I-4 corridor, their voices will be diluted. Their power in this process simply washed away.” 

Rep. Kaylee Tuck (R) supported the enacted map saying, “[DeSantis] publicly submitted maps, which is something that anybody can do. He’s allowed to do it. Every single member of the public was allowed to do it. And just because it’s different, doesn’t mean it’s bad. Just because it’s different, doesn’t mean it’s wrong. It’s just different. The process was thorough, it was transparent. It was open. It was complete. It was constitutional. And it was good.”

As of April 25, 40 states have adopted new congressional maps, one state’s maps have been overturned by court action, and three states have not yet adopted congressional redistricting plans after the 2020 census. Six states were apportioned one U.S. House district, so no congressional redistricting is required. As of April 25 in 2012, 42 states had enacted congressional redistricting plans.

States have completed congressional redistricting for 393 of the 435 seats (90.3%) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

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