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Juan Garcia de Paredes

Juan Garcia de Paredes is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Schweikert defeats Barnett and Norton in the Republican primary for Arizona’s 1st Congressional District

Incumbent David Schweikert defeated Josh Barnett and Elijah Norton in the Republican primary for Arizona’s 1st Congressional District on August 2, 2022. Schweikert and Norton led in fundraising and media attention throughout the race.

Schweikert was the incumbent in Arizona’s 6th Congressional District and ran in the 1st District due to redistricting. According to data from DailyKos, 75% of the redrawn 1st District, which covered parts of Phoenix and Scottsdale, came from areas Schweikert represented in the 6th District. U.S. Rep. Tom O’Halleran (D), the incumbent in the 1st District, ran in the 2nd District.

Schweikert served in the Arizona House of Representatives from 1991 to 1995 and as Maricopa County’s treasurer from 2004 to 2006 before being elected to represent the 6th District in 2010.

Schweikert highlighted his record on tax policy and economic issues, including voting for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. Schweikert’s website said, “As a member of the Ways and Means committee responsible for tax policy, David took the lead in ensuring the historic tax cuts in 2017 became law.” Schweikert also focused on his opposition to vaccine mandates and President Joe Biden’s (D) immigration policies. Former President Donald Trump (R) endorsed Schweikert.

Norton, a Missouri native, is the founder and owner of Veritas Global Protection Services, a Phoenix-based car insurance company. Norton highlighted his business credentials, saying that, as an entrepreneur, he would bring a unique perspective to Congress. Norton also cited immigration as a top issue, saying he supported investing in technology to monitor the border and “establish[ing] a criminal database sharing system with Mexico.” In his responses to Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey, Norton said he intended to serve no more than eight years in Congress and would donate his congressional salary to charity.

At the time of the primary, three election forecasters rated the general election Lean Republican. According to Inside Elections’ Nathan Gonzales, the redrawn 1st district was slightly more competitive than the old 6th district. “[The 1st district] got a little more Democratic by the presidential numbers. Trump won the old district by 4 points, but Biden would have won the newly drawn District by a single point,” Gonzales said.



Masters wins Republican primary for United States Senate in Arizona

Blake Masters defeated Jim Lamon, Mark Brnovich, and two other candidates in the Republican primary for United States Senate in Arizona on August 2, 2022. Incumbent Mark Kelly (D) is running for re-election.

Masters, a tech entrepreneur, co-authored Zero to One: Notes on a Startup, a business book based on a class tech investor Peter Thiel taught at Stanford. Masters joined Thiel Capital in 2014 and was named president of the Thiel foundation in 2015. Masters supported increased regulation of technology companies and privatizing Social Security. Thiel, former President Donald Trump (R), and TV show host Tucker Carlson endorsed Masters.

Lamon founded DEPCOM Power, a solar energy company he sold in 2021. Lamon largely self-funded his campaign. According to Open Secrets, Lamon contributed $14M to his campaign as of August 2, 2022, or 93% of all funds donated. Lamon cited U.S.-China trade relations as a top issue, saying, “Communist China is the biggest threat to our economic security and national sovereignty.” The Conservative Political Action Coalition, the National Border Patrol Council, and a number of state legislators endorsed Lamon.

Brnovich, a career prosecutor, was elected Arizona’s attorney general in 2014. Before that, Brnovich served as an assistant attorney general from 1998 to 2003 and as the director of Arizona’s Department of Gaming from 2009 to 2013. Brnovich highlighted the legal challenges his office brought against President Joe Biden’s (D) tax and immigration policies, among others. TV show host Sean Hannity and radio host Mark Levin endorsed Brnovich.

All three candidates cited border security as a top issue. Brnovich highlighted his record as attorney general, saying he challenged border measures such as the 100-day pause on deportations. Masters said he would increase the size of the border patrol and use hi-tech surveillance at the border. Lamon said he would end sanctuary cities and called the border a “breeding ground for trafficking of illegal drugs, sex trafficking (including children), and even some known terrorists.” All three candidates said they supported finishing the construction of a border wall.

Brnovich and Lamon criticized Masters for his relationship with Thiel. Brnovich said, “I know that the answer to Big Tech is not having someone that’s financed by Big Tech and made all their money in Big Tech.” Masters said that his understanding of tech companies would allow him to confront them better. “I know how it works,” Masters said.

In June, Saving Arizona PAC, a political action committee affiliated with Thiel, released an ad criticizing Lamon’s solar company for importing supplies from China and said the company was “associated with forced slave labor.” Lamon said everyone in the energy industry used Chinese parts and added, “This ad paid for by Blake Masters’ big tech super PAC is ridiculous and comically hypocritical given Masters’ extremely recent and proactive business dealings with China.”

The 2020 presidential election was a top issue in the race as well. Trump criticized Brnovich, saying he didn’t do enough as Arizona’s attorney general to investigate fraud in the election. Brnovich, who opened an ongoing civil investigation into the 2020 results in Arizona, said, “I understand [Trump’s] frustration, but as I’ve said previously, I will continue to follow the facts and evidence and do what the law requires.”

Masters and Lamon, who signed his name on a list of alternate Arizona presidential electors ahead of the 2021 Electoral College vote count, said they wouldn’t have voted to certify the election. Masters said he believed Trump won the election.

Michael McGuire and Justin Olson also ran in the primary.

Three election forecasters rate the general election a Toss-up, meaning the race is expected to be competitive.



Minnesota sees fewer U.S. House candidates this year than in 2020 and 2018

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in Minnesota was May 31, 2022. Thirty-two candidates are running for Minnesota’s eight U.S. House districts, including 18 Democrats and 14 Republicans. That’s four candidates per district, less than the 4.63 candidates per district in 2020 and the 4.75 in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Minnesota was apportioned eight districts, the same number it was apportioned after the 2010 census.
  • The 32 candidates running this year are five fewer than the 37 candidates who ran in 2020 and six fewer than the 38 who ran in 2018. Thirty candidates ran in 2016, 19 in 2014, and 28 in 2012. 
  • One district—the 1st—is open. That’s one more than in 2020 when there were no open seats and two fewer than in 2018 when there were three open seats. 
  • Former Rep. Jim Hagedorn (R)—the incumbent in the 1st district—passed away while in office on February 17, 2022. A special election to fill the seat is scheduled for August 9, 2022. 
  • Eight candidates—three Republicans and five Democrats, including incumbent Rep. Ilhan Omar (D)—are running in the 5th district, the most candidates running for a seat this year.
  • There are nine contested primaries this year, five Democratic and four Republican. That number is down from 10 contested primaries in 2020 and 2018.
  • Four incumbents — two Democrats and two Republicans — are not facing any primary challengers.
  • Democratic and Republican candidates filed to run in all eight districts, so no seats are guaranteed to either party this year. 

Minnesota and three other states — Connecticut, Vermont, and Wisconsin — are holding primary elections on August 9, 2022. In Minnesota, the winner of a primary election is the candidate who receives the greatest number of votes cast for that office, even if he or she does not win an outright majority.

Additional reading:

List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2022



Vermont’s only U.S. House seat is open for the first time since 2006

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in Vermont this year was May 26, 2022. Seven candidates filed to run for Vermont’s At-Large U.S. House district, a decade-high. That’s one more than the six candidates who ran in 2020 and two more than the five who ran in 2018. 

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  1. Because it has only one U.S. House seat, Vermont did not need to redistrict after the 2020 census.
  2. Vermont’s only U.S. House seat is open for the first time since 2006, when incumbent Rep. Peter Welch (D) was elected. Welch is retiring to run for the U.S. Senate. 
  3. Four Democrats and three Republicans are running to replace Welch, meaning both primaries are contested. Both primaries were contested in 2020 and 2018 as well. 

Vermont and three other states — Connecticut, Minnesota, and Wisconsin — are holding primary elections on August 9, 2022. Winners in Vermont primary elections are determined via plurality vote, meaning that the candidate with the highest number of votes wins even if he or she did not win an outright majority of votes cast. In the event of a tie, a runoff election is held.

Additional reading:

List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2022



Wisconsin sees the fewest U.S. House candidates since 2012

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in Wisconsin this year was June 1, 2022. Twenty-two candidates are running for Wisconsin’s eight U.S. House districts, including nine Democrats and 13 Republicans. That’s 2.75 candidates per district, less than the 2.88 candidates per district in 2020 and the 3.13 in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  1. This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Wisconsin was apportioned eight districts, the same number it was apportioned after the 2010 census.
  2. The 22 candidates running this year are the fewest candidates running for Wisconsin’s U.S. House seats since 2012, when 20 candidates ran. Twenty-three candidates ran in 2020, 25 in 2018, 23 in 2016, and 27 in 2014.
  1. One district — the 3rd — is open. That’s the same number of open seats as every other election cycle this past decade.
  2. Rep. Ron Kind (D), the incumbent in the 3rd district, is retiring. 
  3. Five candidates — four Democrats and one Republican — are running to replace Kind, the most candidates running for a seat this year.
  4. There are six contested primaries this year — one Democratic and five Republican. That’s the same number as in 2020 and 2018 and two fewer than in 2016 and 2014.
  5. Four incumbents — two Democrats and two Republicans — are not facing any primary challengers.
  6. Two districts — the 6th and the 8th — are guaranteed to Republicans because no Democrats made the ballot. 

Wisconsin and three other states — Connecticut, Minnesota, and Vermont — are holding primary elections on August 9, 2022. Winners in Wisconsin primary elections are determined via plurality vote, meaning that the candidate with the highest number of votes wins even if he or she did not win an outright majority of votes cast.

Additional reading:

List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2022



Nineteen candidates are running in the top-four primary for United States Senate in Alaska on August 16, 2022

Nineteen candidates are running in the top-four primary for United States Senate in Alaska on August 16, 2022. Incumbent Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R) is running for re-election.

This is the first use of the top-four primary system for a U.S. Senate seat in Alaska since voters approved its use in November 2020. All candidates run in a single primary regardless of party affiliation. The four candidates to receive the most votes advance to the general election, where the winner is decided using ranked-choice voting. 

The 19 candidates include eight Republicans, three Democrats, one Libertarian, five independents, and two Alaskan Independence Party candidates.

FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver wrote that it’s likely that at least two Republican candidates and a Democratic one will advance to the general election following the primary. Four total candidates will advance.

As of July 2022, the candidates who reported raising funds for the election or had been named in public polling were:

  1. Murkowski, who was endorsed by U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R), fellow Alaska U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan (R), and Sens. Joe Manchin (D) and Kyrsten Sinema (D);
  2. Kelly Tshibaka (R), a former commissioner at the Alaska Department of Administration who was endorsed by former President Donald Trump (R) and the Alaska Republican Party;
  3. Patricia Chesbro (D), an educator from Palmer;
  4. Huhnkie Lee (I), a computer programmer and attorney;
  5. Shoshana Gungurstein (I), a businesswoman;
  6. Sean Thorne (L), a U.S. Army veteran;
  7. and Dustin Darden (Alaskan Independence Party), a maintenance worker and 2018 candidate for the Alaska House of Representatives.

Three election forecasters rate the general election Solid or Safe Republican.

Murkowski’s father, Frank Murkowski (R), held the Senate seat from 1980 to 2002, when he resigned to become governor of Alaska. After taking office, the elder Murkowski appointed his daughter to the U.S. Senate seat. In 2010, after losing the Republican nomination, Lisa Murkowski successfully ran for re-election as a write-in candidate. She is one of two U.S. Senators, alongside South Carolina’s Strom Thurmond in 1954, to have been elected as a write-in candidate.



All Connecticut U.S. House incumbents file to run for re-election

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in Connecticut this year was June 7, 2022. Eleven candidates are running for Connecticut’s five U.S. House districts, including five Democrats and six Republicans. That’s 2.2 candidates per district, down from 2.6 in 2020 and 2018. 

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  1. This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Connecticut was apportioned five districts, the same number it was apportioned after the 2010 census.
  2. The 11 candidates running this year are the fewest since 2014, when 10 candidates ran, and down from 13 in 2020 and 2018. 
  1. All incumbents are running for re-election, meaning there are no open seats this year. The 5th District is the only Connecticut U.S. House seat to have opened up this past decade. It was open in 2012 after incumbent Rep. Chris Murphy (D) decided to run for the U.S. Senate, and again in 2018 when incumbent Rep. Elizabeth Esty (D) did not file for re-election. 
  2. The Republican primary in the 4th District is the only contested primary this year. That’s down from two in 2020 and 2018. 
  3. No incumbents are facing primary challengers. 
  4. Republican and Democratic candidates filed to run in all five districts, so no seats are guaranteed to either party this year.

Connecticut and three other states—Minnesota, Vermont, and Wisconsin—are holding primary elections on August 9, 2022. Winners in primary elections in Connecticut are determined via plurality vote, meaning that the candidate with the greatest number of votes wins the election even if he or she did not win an outright majority of votes cast.



Pat Ryan and Marc Molinaro are running in the special election for New York’s 19th Congressional District

Pat Ryan (D) and Marc Molinaro (R) are running in the special election to fill the seat representing New York’s 19th Congressional District in the U.S. House on August 23, 2022. Former incumbent Antonio Delgado (D) resigned after Gov. Kathy Hochul (D) selected him as lieutenant governor. The winner of the special election will serve the rest of Delgado’s term that ends on January 3, 2023.

The special election is one of two elections for New York’s 19th District in 2022. The other is the regularly scheduled election on November 8.

The boundaries of the 19th District changed in 2022 due to redistricting. The special election will be held under the old district lines, while the November election will be held in the newly redrawn district. The old district has a partisan lean of R+4, according to FiveThirtyEight, while the redrawn district has a partisan lean of R+1. 

“The current 19th is a swing district, and the special election has outsized national implications, as it will determine the size of the Democratic majority in the House of Representatives for the remainder of the 117th Congress,” said The Times Union’s Timmy Facciola. “The victor will also gain incumbent status before the November midterm elections, for which both Molinaro and Ryan have declared their candidacies in New York’s newly drawn districts,” Facciola added.

Molinaro is running to represent the 19th District in both the special and November general elections. Ryan is running for the 19th District in the special election and for the redrawn 18th District in the November general election.

Ryan has served as Ulster County executive since 2019. A tech entrepreneur and former Army intelligence officer, Ryan has highlighted his military service and business experience. Ryan has also focused on abortion, saying, “I fought to defend the freedoms of this country and access to abortion is a fundamental freedom.” Ryan ran in the 2018 Democratic primary for the 19th District, finishing in second place with 18% of the vote to Delgado’s 22%.

Molinaro has served as Dutchess County executive since 2012 and was the Republican nominee for governor of New York in 2018, losing to incumbent Andrew Cuomo (D) 57% to 36%. Molinaro has highlighted his support for measures that encourage investment in digital assets. Molinaro’s website says, “Blockchain technology […] has the potential to provide a system of online banking to those who have never before had access.”

Both candidates have focused on opioid addiction and mental health issues. Ryan said he directed investments from the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 to local mental health programs. “We saw suicides in Ulster County during the pandemic double. We saw fatal opioid overdoses up 93 percent,” Ryan said. “So a lot of what we’re doing with the Rescue Plan funds at the local level is reinvesting in mental health,” he added.

Molinaro said he supports expanding access to mental healthcare and addressing “the country’s mental and behavioral health crisis through local community needs.” On opioid addiction, Molinaro said he supports opening crisis stabilization centers, creating a local opioid response grant program, and addressing the trafficking of illegal drugs such as fentanyl. “We can end this epidemic, but we must do so by treating it as [a] public health crisis and the people suffering from it with dignity and care,” Molinaro said.

As of July 16, 2022, 16 special elections have been called during the 117th Congress. From the 113th Congress to the 116th Congress, 50 special elections were held.



There are no open U.S. House seats in Washington for the first time in a decade

The filing deadline for candidates running for the U.S. House in Washington was May 20, 2022. This year, 68 candidates are running in Washington’s 10 U.S. House districts, including 37 Republicans, 19 Democrats, seven independents, and five third-party candidates. That’s 6.8 candidates per district, fewer than the 7.3 candidates in 2020, and more than the 4.9 candidates per district in 2018. 

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Washington was apportioned ten districts, the same number it was apportioned after the 2010 census.
  • All ten incumbents are running for re-election, meaning there are no open U.S. House seats for the first time in a decade. 
  • There are ten contested primaries this year, the same number as in 2020 and two fewer than in 2018, when there were eight contested primaries. 
  • All ten incumbents running for re-election are facing primary challengers this year. In 2020, all nine incumbents who filed for re-election faced primary challengers. In 2018, seven of the nine who filed did. 
  • In Washington’s top-two primary system, all candidates are listed on the same ballot regardless of party affiliation. Two incumbents — Rep. Suzan DelBene (D) and Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D) — are not facing intra-party primary challengers. DelBene represents the 1st district, and Jayapal represents the 7th.
  • At this point, no districts are guaranteed to either party. Democratic and Republican candidates have filed to run in the primaries in all ten districts. After the primaries take place, some districts may have two candidates of the same party running in the general under Washington’s top-two primary system.
  • Eleven candidates are running in the 8th district, the most candidates running for a seat this year. Three Democrats, including incumbent Kim Schrier (D), five Republicans, one independent, one Libertarian, and one Concordia Party candidate have filed to run. 

Washington and four other states — Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, and Missouri — are holding primary elections on August 2. Washington utilizes a top-two primary system. In a top-two primary system, all candidates are listed on the same ballot. The top two vote-getters, regardless of their partisan affiliations, advance to the general election.



David Schweikert, Josh Barnett, and Elijah Norton are running in the Republican primary for Arizona’s 1st Congressional District

David Schweikert, Josh Barnett, and Elijah Norton are running in the Republican primary for Arizona’s 1st Congressional District on August 2, 2022. Schweikert and Norton have led in fundraising and media attention.

Schweikert is the incumbent in Arizona’s 6th Congressional District and is running in the 1st district due to redistricting. According to data from DailyKos, 75% of the redrawn 1st District, which covers parts of Phoenix and Scottsdale, comes from areas represented by Schweikert in the 6th district. U.S. Rep. Tom O’Halleran (D), the incumbent in the 1st district, is running in the 2nd district.

Schweikert served in the Arizona House of Representatives from 1991 to 1995 and as Maricopa County’s treasurer from 2004 to 2006 before being elected to represent the 6th district in 2010.

Schweikert has highlighted his record on economic issues, including voting for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. Schweikert’s website says, “As a member of the Ways and Means committee responsible for tax policy, David took the lead in ensuring the historic tax cuts in 2017 became law.” Schweikert has also focused on his opposition to vaccine mandates and President Joe Biden’s (D) immigration policies. Former President Donald Trump (R) endorsed Schweikert.

Norton, a Missouri native, is the founder and owner of Veritas Global Protection Services, a Phoenix-based car insurance company. As of July 2022, Norton had contributed more than 80% of the funds raised by his campaign, according to data from Open Secrets

Norton has highlighted his business credentials, saying that, as an entrepreneur, he will bring a unique perspective to Congress. Norton also cited immigration as a top issue, saying he supports building a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border, investing in technology to monitor the border, and “establish[ing] a criminal database sharing system with Mexico.” In his responses to Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey, Norton said he intends to serve no more than eight years in Congress and said he would donate his congressional salary to charity.

Norton has focused on allegations Schweikert violated congressional and campaign finance regulations. Norton said, “In 2020, self-described ‘fiscal hero’ David Schweikert was unanimously Reprimanded by every Republican and every Democrat and paid a $50,000 fine after the House Ethics Committee released findings that Schweikert committed 11 ethics violations.” After the FEC fined Schweikert’s campaign committee $125,000 in January 2022, Norton said, “This fine confirms what we already know to be true, David Schweikert has failed to represent his district, and continually brings shame upon Arizona.

Schweikert’s campaign said his former chief of staff is responsible for many of the campaign finance violations cited in the FEC and the House Ethics Committee reports. Chris Baker, an Arizona-based consultant working with the campaign, said, “No one has been more directly harmed by the malfeasance of Rep. Schweikert’s former chief of staff than Friends of David Schweikert.” In a separate interview, Baker said Schweikert has “a lot of support from people who know his record, like what he’s done and like having him as their congressman.”

Three election forecasters rate the general election Lean Republican. According to Inside Elections’ Nathan Gonzales, the redrawn 1st district is slightly more competitive than the old 6th district. “[The 1st district] got a little more Democratic by the presidential numbers. Trump won the old district by 4 points, but Biden would have won the newly drawn district by a single point,” Gonzales said.