Author

Juan Garcia de Paredes

Juan Garcia de Paredes is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Raphael Warnock (D) and Herschel Walker (R) are running in the runoff for U.S. Senate in Georgia

Incumbent Raphael Warnock (D) and Herschel Walker (R) are running in the runoff election for U.S. Senate in Georgia on December 6, 2022.

Warnock and Walker were the top-two vote-getters in the November 8, 2022, general election, with Warnock winning 49.4% of the vote to Walker’s 48.5%. Libertarian Chase Oliver won 2.1% of the vote and did not advance to the runoff. In Georgia, a general election advances to a runoff between the two top finishers if no candidate receives more than 50% of the vote.

This is the second Georgia Senate election in a row to go to a runoff. In 2020, Georgia held two elections for the U.S. Senate. In the regular election, incumbent U.S. Sen. David Perdue (R) and Jon Ossoff (D) advanced to a runoff after neither received the votes to win the general election outright. In the special election to replace U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson (R), Warnock and incumbent Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R)—whom Gov. Brian Kemp (R) appointed to fill the vacancy created when Isakson retired—advanced to a runoff for the same reason. The runoffs took place on January 5, 2021.

Warnock defeated Loeffler in the runoff and Ossoff defeated Perdue, giving Democrats an effective majority in the U.S. Senate (the partisan split following the runoffs was 50-50, with Vice President Kamala Harris (D) casting tie-breaking votes).

Unlike the 2021 runoffs, the 2022 runoff will not determine control of the U.S. Senate. Democrats won 50 Senate seats in the November 8 general election, enough to maintain effective control of the chamber. If Warnock wins, Democrats would expand their majority to 51.

Before assuming office, Warnock served as the senior pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. also served as pastor. Warnock’s campaign said, “As the 18th most bipartisan Senator, Reverend Warnock successfully negotiated investments for Georgia businesses to grow jobs in state and end our reliance on foreign countries like China, capped the cost of insulin for seniors to $35 a month, fought to keep open the Savannah Combat Readiness Training Center, and took on the shipping companies and big corporations making record prices while increasing costs for Georgians.”

Walker is a businessman and a Hall of Fame professional football player who represented the U.S. in the 1992 Olympics. Walker’s campaign said, “Herschel Walker is fully prepared to lower taxes and curb inflation, back law enforcement and fight back against crime. He will secure our border from drugs and illegal immigrants and take men out of women’s sports.”

As a result of a change in Georgia state law, the 2022 runoffs will take place on December 6, not January 5. On March 25, 2021, Gov. Kemp signed Senate Bill 202, which shortened the time between a general election and a runoff from nine weeks to 28 days.

As of November 22, the U.S. Senate election in Georgia ranked as the second most expensive Senate election in 2022 and the fourth most expensive Senate race ever. According to data from Open Secrets, candidate campaign committees and satellite spending groups had spent $307 million in the race.

Including the 2021 runoffs, four Senate runoffs have taken place in Georgia. The first Senate runoff occurred in 1992. Incumbent Wyche Fowler (D) lost to Paul Coverdell (R) in that election.  In 2008, incumbent Saxby Chambliss (R) won re-election after defeating Jim Martin (D) in a runoff.



Raphael Warnock (D) and Herschel Walker (R) are running in the runoff for U.S. Senate in Georgia

Incumbent Raphael Warnock (D) and Herschel Walker (R) are running in the runoff election for U.S. Senate in Georgia on December 6, 2022.

Warnock and Walker were the top-two vote-getters in the November 8, 2022, general election, with Warnock winning 49.4% of the vote to Walker’s 48.5%. Libertarian Chase Oliver won 2.1% of the vote and did not advance to the runoff. In Georgia, a general election advances to a runoff between the two top finishers if no candidate receives more than 50% of the vote.

This is the second Georgia Senate election in a row to go to a runoff. In 2020, Georgia held two elections for the U.S. Senate. In the regular election, incumbent U.S. Sen. David Perdue (R) and Jon Ossoff (D) advanced to a runoff after neither received the votes to win the general election outright. In the special election to replace U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson (R), Warnock and incumbent Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R)—whom Gov. Brian Kemp (R) appointed to fill the vacancy created when Isakson retired—advanced to a runoff for the same reason. The runoffs took place on January 5, 2021.

Warnock defeated Loeffler in the runoff and Ossoff defeated Perdue, giving Democrats an effective majority in the U.S. Senate (the partisan split following the runoffs was 50-50, with Vice President Kamala Harris (D) casting tie-breaking votes).

Unlike the 2021 runoffs, the 2022 runoff will not determine control of the U.S. Senate. Democrats won 50 Senate seats in the November 8 general election, enough to maintain effective control of the chamber. If Warnock wins, Democrats would expand their majority to 51.

Before assuming office, Warnock served as the senior pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. also served as pastor. Warnock’s campaign said, “As the 18th most bipartisan Senator, Reverend Warnock successfully negotiated investments for Georgia businesses to grow jobs in state and end our reliance on foreign countries like China, capped the cost of insulin for seniors to $35 a month, fought to keep open the Savannah Combat Readiness Training Center, and took on the shipping companies and big corporations making record prices while increasing costs for Georgians.”

Walker is a businessman and a Hall of Fame professional football player who represented the U.S. in the 1992 Olympics. Walker’s campaign said, “Herschel Walker is fully prepared to lower taxes and curb inflation, back law enforcement and fight back against crime. He will secure our border from drugs and illegal immigrants and take men out of women’s sports.”

As a result of a change in Georgia state law, the 2022 runoffs will take place on December 6, not January 5. On March 25, 2021, Gov. Kemp signed Senate Bill 202, which shortened the time between a general election and a runoff from nine weeks to 28 days.

As of November 22, the U.S. Senate election in Georgia ranked as the second most expensive Senate election in 2022 and the fourth most expensive Senate race ever. According to data from Open Secrets, candidate campaign committees and satellite spending groups had spent $307 million in the race.

Including the 2021 runoffs, four Senate runoffs have taken place in Georgia. The first Senate runoff occurred in 1992. Incumbent Wyche Fowler (D) lost to Paul Coverdell (R) in that election.  In 2008, incumbent Saxby Chambliss (R) won re-election after defeating Jim Martin (D) in a runoff.



Incumbent Kathy Hochul (D) and Lee Zeldin (R) are running for governor of New York

Incumbent Kathy Hochul (D) and Lee Zeldin (R) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for governor of New York.

TIME’s Charlotte Alter wrote, “In a normal year, New York Governor Kathy Hochul might be coasting to victory in November. She’s a reasonably popular Democrat running for re-election in a blue state that hasn’t elected a Republican governor in 20 years. […] Yet as Democrats brace for a Republican wave in the midterm elections, Hochul’s race has tightened, getting too close for Democrats’ comfort.”

Hochul was the lieutenant governor of New York under former Governor Andrew Cuomo (D) and replaced him in August 2021 after Cuomo resigned from office. Hochul represented New York’s 26th Congressional District from 2011 to 2012 and served as Erie County clerk from 2007 to 2011. Hochul is New York’s first female governor.

Zeldin, an attorney and officer with the U.S. Army Reserve, has represented New York’s 1st Congressional District since 2015. Before being elected to Congress, Zeldin represented the 3rd District in the New York State Senate.

Zeldin has centered his campaign around public safety and said crime rates in New York have risen during Hochul’s tenure. Zeldin said Hochul should do more to revise the state’s bail laws and accused her of supporting “catch-and-release policies.” Zeldin said, “There is a crime emergency right now in New York State. The governor is unwilling to call it for what it is. Many of her allies are unwilling to call it for exactly what it is. The public is being lectured to and told to look away.” Zeldin said that, if elected, he would change the state bail laws and “fire weak prosecutors.”

In response, Hochul said she had prioritized New Yorkers’ safety by focusing on removing weapons from the streets. Hochul highlighted her support for gun control measures and criticized Zeldin for not supporting bills regulating assault weapons while in Congress. “While our extreme opponents are trying to keep people scared, I’m working to keep New Yorkers safe with real action to get dangerous weapons out of our communities,” Hochul said. On bail reform, Hochul said she had already signed into law changes to the state’s bail laws in April 2021.

Hochul has also focused on abortion and said she would fight against measures rolling back access to it. At a debate in October, Hochul criticized Zeldin for his record on the issue. “You’re the only person standing on this stage whose name right now — not years past — that right now, is on a bill called ‘Life Begins at Conception,’ ” Hochul said.

In response, Zeldin said he would not seek to change the state’s laws regarding abortion. “Let me be clear. As Governor, I will not change and could not change New York’s abortion law,” Zeldin said in a campaign ad.

Each candidate has a running mate for lieutenant governor. Hochul’s running mate is incumbent Lieutenant Governor Antonio Delgado (D), and Zeldin’s running mate is Alison Esposito (R).

This is one of 36 gubernatorial elections taking place in 2022. The governor serves as a state’s top executive official and is the only executive office that is elected in all 50 states. There are currently 28 Republican governors and 22 Democratic governors. Click here for a clickable map with links to our coverage of all 50 states’ responses to the pandemic and here for an overview of all 36 gubernatorial elections taking place in 2022.

Heading into the 2022 elections, there are 23 Republican trifectas, 14 Democratic trifectas, and 13 divided governments where neither party holds trifecta control. There are 23 Republican triplexes, 18 Democratic triplexes, and nine divided governments where neither party holds triplex control.

A state government trifecta refers to a situation where one party controls a state’s governorship and majorities in both chambers of the state legislature. A state government triplex refers to a situation where the governor, attorney general, and secretary of state are all members of the same political party.



Ballotpedia is tracking 377 rematches this year between candidates who last faced each other in 2018 or 2020

Ballotpedia is tracking 377 rematches this year between candidates who last faced each other in 2018 or 2020. That’s down from 2020, when there were 402 rematches from 2018 alone.

This year’s rematches include:

  • 340 between candidates running for offices with two-year terms who last faced off in 2020; and,
  • 37 between candidates running for offices with four-year terms who last faced off in 2018.

The offices contested in these rematches include:

  • 51 U.S. House districts;
  • Five state executive offices;
  • 287 state legislative seats; and,
  • 34 local offices.

Of this total, 111 rematches (29%) were decided by 10 percentage points or fewer during their last contests.

Of the 51 U.S. House rematches, Democrats won 36 in 2020, and Republicans won 15. Ten of those elections were decided by 10 percentage points or fewer.

Of the five state executive rematches, the following parties won those offices when they were last up for election:

  • Democrats won one, the governorship of Connecticut; and,
  • Republicans won four, including the governorship of Georgia and the lieutenant governorship of Texas

Of the 287 state legislative rematches, the following parties won those offices when they were last up for election:

  • Democrats won 156;
  • Republicans won 127; and,
  • Minor party and independent candidates won four.

Of the 34 local election rematches, the following parties won those offices when they were last up for election:

  • Democrats won 17;
  • Republicans won two; and,
  • Nonpartisan and independent candidates won 15

In addition to head-to-head rematches between two candidates running for a single seat, 197 elections this year feature two or more candidates running in a multi-member district who also ran against each other in 2018 or 2020. They include:

  • Two candidates running for at-large seats in a multi-member state executive board
  • 360 candidates running in 139 multi-member state legislative districts; and,
  • 136 candidates running in 57 multi-member municipal districts.



Jamie McLeod-Skinner and Lori Chavez-DeRemer are running for Oregon’s 5th Congressional District

Jamie McLeod-Skinner and Lori Chavez-DeRemer are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Oregon’s 5th Congressional District. Incumbent Kurt Schrader (D), who was first elected in 2008, ran for re-election. He lost to McLeod-Skinner in the Democratic primary on May 17, 2022.

FiveThirtyEight’s Geoffrey Skelley and Ryan Best said, “[Democratic primary voters] ousted longtime centrist Rep. Kurt Schrader and backed progressive Jamie McLeod-Skinner in this D+3 seat, which has potentially boosted the chances of Republican Lori Chavez-DeRemer.”

The Oregonian’s Grant Stringer called the race “one of a pair that could be the closest of their kind in Oregon in a generation.”

McLeod-Skinner is an attorney and regional emergency manager. In her responses to Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey, McLeod-Skinner said she is “committed to lowering the cost of healthcare and prescription drugs, helping families in this difficult economy, and implementing proven solutions to tackle crime.” McLeod-Skinner has criticized Chavez-DeRemer’s position on abortion. “My opponent would ban access to abortion before a woman know she’s pregnant. My opponent is trying to take away our reproductive rights; I will defend them,” McLeod-Skinner said.

Chavez-DeRemer, a businesswoman and the former mayor of Happy Valley, Oregon, has focused on economic issues and law enforcement. Chavez-DeRemer said, “I will keep our taxes low, fully fund our police, and expand educational opportunities for our children.” On law enforcement, DeRemer said McLeod-Skinner would reduce funding for police departments. “My opponent wants to fully defund the police. She has marched in the defund the police movements three times,” Chavez-DeRemer said.

Oregon’s 5th district was redrawn after the 2020 census. The redrawn district stretches from southeast Portland to Bend and includes parts of Clackamas, Deschutes, Linn, Marion, and Multnomah counties. According to The Cook Political Report and FiveThirtyEight, the partisan composition of the district did not change significantly after redistricting.

In the 2020 presidential election, President Joe Biden (D) received 53.6% of the 5th District’s vote to former President Donald Trump’s (R) 43.9%. According to data from Daily Kos, the redrawn 5th District voted for Biden 53.2% to 44.4%.

As of June 2022, 33% of registered voters in the redrawn district were non-affiliated, 33% were Democrats, 28% were Republicans, and 7% were registered with a third party.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts are up for election. As of September 30, 2022, Democrats held a 220-212 majority in the U.S. House with three vacancies. 



Democrat Josh Riley and Republican Marc Molinaro are running in New York’s 19th Congressional District

Josh Riley (D) and Marc Molinaro (R) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New York’s 19th Congressional District. Incumbent Pat Ryan (D) is running for re-election in New York’s 18th Congressional District due to redistricting.

Riley is a private attorney and former congressional staffer. Riley highlighted his ties to the district and said he would work to encourage job growth in Upstate New York. Riley said, “We should be saying no to bad trade deals. We can invest in high-tech jobs that restore manufacturing and fight climate change. We can build an upstate economy that works for working families. That’s why I’m running for Congress.”

Molinaro was elected Dutchess County executive in 2011 and was the 2018 Republican nominee for governor of New York. Molinaro said, “As a County Executive, I’ve worked with both sides to cut taxes and spending, fully fund police and lend a hand to those with disabilities through our Think Differently initiative. I’m running for Congress because it’s time they think differently as well.”

Molinaro lost to Pat Ryan 51.1% to 48.8% in a special election on August 23, 2022, to fill the remainder of former Rep. Antonio Delgado’s (D) term. Delgado represented the 19th district from 2019 until May 25, 2022, when he resigned to become lieutenant governor.

The 19th district was redrawn after the 2020 census to encompass the cities of Ithaca and Binghampton. According to the Cook Political Report, the old district had a partisan lean of R+2, while the redrawn district has an even partisan lean.

In the 2020 presidential election, President Joe Biden (D) received 49.8% of the 19th district’s vote to former President Donald Trump’s (R) 48.3%. According to data from Daily Kos, Biden would have received 51.3% of the vote in the redrawn district, and Trump would have received 46.7%.

As of June 2022, 36% of the district’s active voters were registered Democrats, 32% were registered Republicans, and 31% were either registered with some other party or unaffiliated.

Both candidates have the organizational and financial support of their respective national parties. Riley is a member of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s “Red to Blue” program, a project that supports Democratic candidates in competitive congressional districts. Molinaro is part of the National Republican Congressional Committee’s Young Guns program, an initiative that supports Republican candidates running for Congress in open or Democratic-held House districts.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of September 30, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-212 advantage in the U.S. House with three vacancies. 



Number of major party candidates on the primary ballot for state legislative offices in 2022

This year, 13,491 major party candidates were on the primary ballot for 6,278 state legislative seats around the country, including 1,300 state senate seats and 4,978 state house seats.

Of the 13,491 major party candidates on the ballot, 6,063, or 44.94%, were Democrats, and 7,428, or 55.06%, were Republicans. 

In state senate races: 

  • There were 2,824 major party candidates on the primary ballot, including 1,254 Democrats, or 44.41% of all candidates who ran, and 1,570 Republicans, or 55.59% of all candidates who ran. 
  • The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 50.16% of major party candidates did, and in 2018, when 53.11% did.
  • Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 49.84% did, and in 2018, when 46.89% did. 
  • There were 0.96 Democratic candidates on the ballot per state senate seat this year. That’s fewer than the 1.09 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.2 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.
  • There were 1.21 Republican candidates on the ballot per U.S. state senate seat in 2022. That’s more than the 1.08 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.06 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.

In state house races: 

  • There were 10,667 major party candidates on the primary ballot this year, including 4,809 Democrats, or 45.08% of all candidates who ran, and 5,858 Republicans, or 54.92% of all candidates who ran. 
  • The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 50.41% of major party candidates did, and in 2018, when 52.69% did.
  • Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 49.59% did, and in 2018, when 47.31% did. 
  • There were 0.97 Democratic candidates on the ballot per state house seat this year. That’s fewer than the 1.06 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.16 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.
  • There were 1.18 Republican candidates on the ballot per state house seat in 2022. That’s more than the 1.04 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and in 2018.


Number of major party candidates on the primary ballot for state judicial offices in 2022

In 2022, there were 88 state judicial positions up for partisan election in states that select judges using partisan elections. One-hundred sixty major party candidates were on the primary ballot in those races, including 72 Democrats, or 45% of all major party candidates who ran, and 88 Republicans, or 55% of all major party candidates who ran.

The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 51.27% of major party candidates did, but higher than in 2018, when 38.12% did.

Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 48.73% did, but lower than in 2018, when 61.88% did.

There were 0.82 Democratic candidates on the ballot per state judicial seat this year. That’s fewer than the 1.11 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and more than the 0.71 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.

There was one Republican candidate on the ballot per state judicial seat in 2022. That’s fewer than the 1.05 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.15 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.



Number of major party candidates on the primary ballot for state executive offices in 2022

This year, 1,140 major party candidates were on the primary ballot for 304 state executive seats around the country. The offices up for election include 36 gubernatorial seats, 30 lieutenant gubernatorial seats, 30 state attorney general seats, and 26 secretary of state seats. 

Of the major party candidates on the ballot, 463, or 40.61%, were Democrats, and 677, or 59.39%, were Republicans.

The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 46.25% of major party candidates did, and in 2018, when 49.02% did.

Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 53.75% did, and in 2018, when 50.98% did.

There were 1.52 Democratic candidates on the ballot per state executive seat this year. That’s more than the 1.35 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and fewer than the 1.7 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.

There were 2.23 Republican candidates on the ballot per state executive seat in 2022. That’s more than the 1.56 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.76 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.



Analysis of major party candidates on the primary ballot for U.S. Senate and U.S. House seats in 2022

In 2022, 2,422 major party candidates appeared on the primary ballot for 474 seats in the U.S. Congress. The seats included 34 U.S. Senate seats, the seats of all 435 U.S. Representatives, and the seats of five of the six non-voting delegates to the U.S. House.

Of the 2,422 candidates who appeared on the primary ballot, 989, or 40.83%, were Democrats, and 1,433, or 59.17%, were Republicans. 

In the U.S. Senate: 

  • There were 304 major party candidates on the primary ballot this year, including 119 Democrats, or 39.14% of all candidates who ran, and 185 Republicans, or 60.86% of all candidates who ran.
  • The 119 Democrats who appeared on the primary ballot this year were 11 more than the 108 who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and 33 more than the 86 who appeared in 2018.
  • The 185 Republicans who appeared on the ballot were 62 more than the 123 who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and 44 more than the 141 who appeared in 2018.

  • The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 46.75% of major party candidates did, but higher than in 2018, when 37.89% did.
  • Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 53.25% did, but lower than in 2018, when 62.11% did.

  • There were 3.5 Democratic candidates on the ballot per U.S. Senate seat this year. That’s more than the 3.27 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 2.61 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.
  • There were 5.44 Republican candidates on the ballot per U.S. Senate seat in 2022. That’s more than the 3.73 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 4.27 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.

In the U.S. House

  • There were 2,118 major party candidates on the primary ballot this year, including 870 Democrats, or 41.08%% of all candidates who ran, and 1,248 Republicans, or 58.92% of all candidates who ran.

  • The 870 Democrats who appeared on the primary ballot this year were 75 fewer than the 945 who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and 211 fewer than the 1,081 who appeared in 2018.
  • The 1,248 Republicans who appeared on the ballot were 195 more than the 1,053 who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and 382 more than the 866 who appeared in 2018.
  • The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 47.3% of major party candidates did, and in 2018, when 55.52% did.
  • Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 52.7% did, and in 2018, when 44.48% did. 

  • There were 1.98 Democratic candidates on the ballot per U.S. House seat this year. That’s fewer than the 2.14 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 2.46 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.
  • There were 2.84 Republican candidates on the ballot per U.S. House seat in 2022. That’s more than the 2.39 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.06 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.