Author

Molly Byrne

Molly Byrne is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Federal Register weekly update: 599 documents added

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From June 27 through July 1, the Federal Register grew by 1,756 pages for a year-to-date total of 39,732 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 599 documents:

  • 460 notices
  • Five presidential documents
  • 44 proposed rules
  • 90 final rules

Four proposed rules, including revisions to criteria for evaluating cardiovascular disorders under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act from the Social Security Administration, and seven final rules, including standards to implement renewable fuel volume targets from the Environmental Protection Agency were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 99 significant proposed rules, 127 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of July 1.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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OIRA reviewed 38 significant rules in June

Photo of the White House in Washington, D.C.

In June 2022, the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) reviewed 38 significant regulatory actions issued by federal agencies. OIRA approved four of these rules with no changes and approved the intent of 32 rules while recommending changes to their content. One rule was withdrawn from the review process by the issuing agency. One rule was subject to a statutory or judicial deadline.

OIRA reviewed 32 significant regulatory actions in June 2021, 72 significant regulatory actions in June 2020, 37 significant regulatory actions in June 2019, 40 significant regulatory actions in June 2018, and 18 significant regulatory actions in June 2017.

OIRA has reviewed a total of 212 significant rules in 2022. The agency reviewed a total of 502 significant rules in 2021, 676 significant rules in 2020, 475 significant rules in 2019, 355 significant rules in 2018, and 237 significant rules in 2017.

As of July 1, 2022, OIRA’s website listed 119 regulatory actions under review.

​​OIRA is responsible for reviewing and coordinating what it deems to be all significant regulatory actions made by federal agencies, with the exception of independent federal agencies. Significant regulatory actions include agency rules that have had or may have a large impact on the economy, environment, public health, or state and local governments and communities. These regulatory actions may also conflict with other regulations or with the priorities of the president.

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Federal Register weekly update: Lowest weekly final rule total so far in 2022

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From June 20 through June 24, the Federal Register grew by 1,214 pages for a year-to-date total of 37,976 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 397 documents:

  • 324 notices
  • Six presidential documents
  • 34 proposed rules
  • 33 final rules

Five proposed rules, including minimum standards for projects under the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) Formula Program from the Federal Highway Administration, and five final rules, including a delay of the effective date of an interim rule to amend the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) regulations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 95 significant proposed rules, 120 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of June 24.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Federal Register weekly update: 555 documents added

Photo of the White House in Washington, D.C.

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From June 13 through June 17, the Federal Register grew by 1,120 pages for a year-to-date total of 36,762 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 555 documents:

  • 437 notices
  • Six presidential documents
  • 57 proposed rules
  • 55 final rules

Four proposed rules, including fuel efficiency requirements for certification of certain airplanes from the Federal Aviation Administration, and two final rules, including an increase to small business size standards for North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) sectors relating to wholesale and retail trade from the Small Business Administration were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 90 significant proposed rules, 115 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of June 17.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Federal Register weekly update: More than 10,000 notices issued so far in 2022

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From June 6 through June 10, the Federal Register grew by 1,576 pages for a year-to-date total of 35,642 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 576 documents:

  • 454 notices
  • Eight presidential documents
  • 42 proposed rules
  • 72 final rules

Four proposed rules, including revisions to the 2020 water quality certification regulatory requirements under the Clean Water Act (CWA) section 401 from the Environmental Protection Agency, and four final rules, including an amendment to regulations to waive excess and unauthorized grazing fees as a result of unforeseen circumstances from the Forest Service Agency were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 86 significant proposed rules, 113 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of June 10.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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Maryland parents oppose state health education framework

Some Maryland parents, according to The Washington Post, have expressed opposition to a state health education framework that outlines how educators should teach students about mental and emotional health; substance abuse prevention; family life and human sexuality; safety and violence prevention; healthy eating; and disease prevention and control. Parents argue that the standards for family life and human sexuality education are not age-appropriate and that parents should be allowed to offer input on how their children are taught certain topics. 

The Maryland State Board of Education adopted the framework in 2019 and school districts have recently begun discussing how to implement the family life and human sexuality lessons in their schools. The framework states that students in pre-kindergarten through third grade should be taught about what the framework considers to be healthy relationships and gender identity, such as recognizing that there is “a range of ways people identify and express their gender” and “that there are different types of families.” The framework permits parents to opt their children out of the family life and human sexuality standards beginning in fourth grade. 

A Carroll County resident said at a school board meeting in April, “The government has no right to attempt to replace parents or their decisions regarding what their children learn,” according to the Post.

Brad Young, the president of the Frederick County school board said, “[The school board’s] job is to set policy for the school system, listen to the community, and adopt [the curriculum]. And if they would let that process work, I think in the end, people would be fine with the outcome,” according to the Post

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Sixteen Republican governors oppose Biden administration’s executive order regarding taxpayer-funded construction contracts

Sixteen Republican governors wrote a letter to President Biden on April 26, 2022, opposing his executive order to mandate project labor agreements (PLAs) on taxpayer-funded construction contracts exceeding $35 million. The letter was signed by governors from Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming. 

Executive Order 14063 was signed by President Biden on February 4, 2022, and aimed to provide structure to large-scale construction projects by requiring the use of PLAs. Republican governors wrote that the executive order grants a monopoly to unions on federal projects and discourages competition. 

The letter said in opposition to PLAs, “When mandated by government agencies, PLAs can interfere with existing union collective bargaining agreements and needlessly discourage competition from quality nonunion contractors and their employees who comprise 87.4% of the private U.S. construction industry workforce according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.”

The executive order stated, “[Project labor agreements] avoid labor-related disruptions on projects by using dispute-resolution processes to resolve worksite disputes and by prohibiting work stoppages, including strikes and lockouts. They secure the commitment of all stakeholders on a construction site that the project will proceed efficiently without unnecessary interruptions. They also advance the interests of project owners, contractors, and subcontractors, including small businesses.”

The letter from Republican governors followed two additional letters sent to President Biden by 42 Senate Republicans and 59 House members in March 2022 to oppose the executive order and PLA mandates. The Biden administration has not responded to the letter as of May 25, 2022. 

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Florida Department of Education aims to avoid critical race theory and social justice in social studies textbooks

Florida’s Department of Education issued guidance to textbook publishers informing them on the instructional materials that can and cannot be included in K-12 social studies textbooks. The guidance notes that “Critical Race Theory, Social Justice, Culturally Responsive Teaching, Social and Emotional Learning, and any other unsolicited theories that may lead to student indoctrination are prohibited.” The specifications also state that “instructional materials should not attempt to indoctrinate or persuade students to a viewpoint inconsistent with Florida standards.”  

Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) said, “We’re working to make sure that the purpose of the school system is to educate our kids, not to indoctrinate our kids. And that’s what parents want to see. So, we are doing more than anybody on education across the board,” according to Miami Herald.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D) opposed the guidance and said, “Gov. DeSantis is bringing a brand of authoritarianism to Florida that Putin, Maduro or Castro would applaud,” according to Politico

The deadline for textbook publishers to submit their social studies proposals to the Florida Department of Education is June 10, 2022. 

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Federal Register weekly update: 1,778 pages added

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From May 30 through June 3, the Federal Register grew by 1,778 pages for a year-to-date total of 34,066 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 493 documents:

  • 378 notices
  • 13 presidential documents
  • 40 proposed rules
  • 62 final rules

One proposed rule, including amendments to the Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP) to support program stability and flexibility from the Personnel Management Office, and eight final rules, including energy conservation standards for manufactured housing from the Energy Department were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 82 significant proposed rules, 109 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of June 3.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017: https://ballotpedia.org/Changes_to_the_Federal_Register 

Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2019: https://ballotpedia.org/Historical_additions_to_the_Federal_Register,_1936-2019



Federal Register weekly update: More than 100 significant final rules issued so far in 2022

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From May 23 through May 27, the Federal Register grew by 1,196 pages for a year-to-date total of 32,288 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 560 documents:

  • 449 notices
  • Five presidential documents
  • 40 proposed rules
  • 66 final rules

Four proposed rules, including an extension to the comment period on a proposed rule to improve tracking of workplace injuries and illnesses from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and seven final rules, including maintenance technician training regulations to conform with the Aircraft Certification, Safety, and Accountability Act from the Federal Aviation Administration were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 81 significant proposed rules, 101 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of May 27.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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