CategoryFederal

Four states with federal candidate filing deadlines in Jan. 2020

Seven statewide filing deadlines for the 2020 federal elections passed before the new year. January will see an additional four statewide ballot access deadlines for the November elections. The following states have their filing deadlines this month:

• Mississippi: January 10
• Kentucky: January 10
• Maryland: January 24
• West Virginia: January 25

Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, California, Texas, Ohio, and North Carolina all had their filing deadlines in 2019. Candidates in Alabama and Arkansas filed in November, and candidates in the remaining states filed in December.

From November 2019 to July 2020, Ballotpedia will cover an average of six statewide filing deadlines each month. November 2019 and February and July 2020 are tied for the fewest with two each. Sixteen states have statewide filing deadlines in March 2020, making it the busiest month for candidate ballot access deadlines for the 2020 elections.

Click here to learn more.

Additional reading:
Elections
Ballotpedia’s Election Analysis Hub, 2020
Twenty Quality Benchmarks for Election Transparency



U.S. Senate confirms Paul Ray as head of federal regulatory review agency

The United States Senate on January 9 voted 50-44 to confirm Paul Ray as administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA).

OIRA is a federal agency located within the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) that reviews regulations, approves government information requests, and provides oversight of statistical and privacy policies. OIRA gives presidents the ability to monitor agency rulemaking.

50 Republicans voted to confirm Ray, while 43 Democrats and Independent Angus King (Maine) voted nay. Six senators did not vote: Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Jerry Moran (R.-Kan.), David Perdue (R-Ga.) Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.), and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.).

Click here to learn more about OIRA.

Click here to learn more about OMB.

Additional reading:
Presidential Executive Order 12866
Regulatory review
Regulatory impact analysis

Click here to view the roll call vote:



Federal Register weekly update; 2020 page total to date exceeds 2019, trails 2018

From January 6 to January 10, the Federal Register grew to 1,730 pages. Over the same period in 2019 and 2018, the Federal Register grew to 106 pages and 2,028 pages, respectively. As of January 10, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 1,624 pages and trailed the 2018 total by 298 pages.

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

According to government data, the Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 362 documents:
• 281 notices
• one presidential document
• 28 proposed rules
• 52 final rules

Three final rules were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that they could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2018 and 2017.

Additional reading:
Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2016.



U.S. Small Business Administration nominee Carranza approved by Senate

On January 7, 2020, the U.S. Senate approved Jovita Carranza to lead the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) by an 88-5 vote. Carranza is now the highest ranking Hispanic woman in President Trump’s administration.

The administrator of the Small Business Administration is responsible for overseeing the programs that assist small businesses in obtaining loans and loan guarantees, as well as contracts, counseling sessions, and other forms of assistance.

Carranza will replace former SBA chief Linda McMahon, who resigned on April 12, 2019, to become the chair of the America First Action PAC. At the time of her appointment, Carranza was serving as treasurer of the United States. Before serving as U.S. Treasurer, Carranza founded the supply-chain management company JCR Group. She also previously served as the deputy administrator for the U.S. Small Business Administration under former President George W. Bush.

Click here to learn more.

Additional Reading:
Donald Trump presidential Cabinet
U.S. Small Business Administration
Linda McMahon



Federal Register weekly update; first 21 rules of 2020

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

From January 1 to January 3, the 2020 Federal Register grew to 418 pages. The publication featured the following 165 documents:
• 131 notices
• zero presidential documents
• 13 proposed rules
• 21 final rules

No proposed or final rules were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that they could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules.

During the first week of 2019, the Federal Register grew to 34 pages. As of January 3, the 2020 total led the 2019 total by 384 pages.

According to government data, the Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2018 and 2017.

Additional reading:
Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2016.



One congressional retirement announced last week; 2,455 major party candidates have filed for 2020 races

On January 3, U.S. Rep. Phil Roe (R-Tenn.) announced he will not seek re-election. Roe has represented Tennessee’s 1st Congressional District since 2009. To date, four senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) and 35 representatives (26 Republicans and nine Democrats) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—37 Republicans and 18 Democrats—did not seek re-election.

As of January 6, 2020, 2,455 major party candidates have filed to run for the Senate and House of Representatives in 2020.

So far, 327 candidates are filed with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate. Of those, 279—147 Democrats and 132 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

For U.S. House, 2,128 candidates are filed with the FEC to run in 2020. Of those, 1,962—959 Democrats and 1,003 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, where all seats are up for election, Democrats currently hold a majority with 232 seats.

Additional Reading:

United States Senate elections, 2020
United States House of Representatives elections, 2020
List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2020

 



Federal Register 2019 in review: Trump administration’s highest page total includes its lowest final rule count

The Trump administration added a total of 72,564 pages to the Federal Register in 2019. The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory execution. The page total will likely decrease further after the National Archives processes the blanks and skips and finalizes the publication.

The 2019 Federal Register included the following 27,167 documents:
• 21,804 notices
• 268 presidential documents
• 2,105 proposed rules
• 2,964 final rules.

 

The 2019 Federal Register page total is the Trump administration’s highest annual page total to date. The Trump administration added a total of 68,082 pages to the Federal Register in 2018 and 61,950 pages in 2017. The 2019 page total exceeded the 2018 page total by 4,482 pages and the 2017 page total by 10,614 pages.
The 2019, 2018, and 2017 page totals under the Trump administration rank as the three lowest page totals since 2001, when the Federal Register reached 64,438 pages. According to government data, the Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

 

Despite featuring the Trump administration’s highest annual page total, the 2019 Federal Register also included the administration’s lowest annual final rule total. The following final rule totals in 2019, 2018, and 2017 under the Trump administration rank as the lowest final rule counts since the 1970’s:
• 2,964 final rules in 2019
• 3,367 final rules in 2018
• 3,280 final rules in 2017

 

Though the total number of final rules decreased in 2019, the total number of proposed rules issued by the Trump administration increased. The Trump administration issued 1,837 proposed rules in 2017, 2,044 proposed rules in 2018, and 2,105 proposed rules in 2019.

 

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2018 and 2017.
Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2016.

 

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.


OIRA reviewed 475 significant rules in 2019

The White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) reviewed a total of 475 significant regulatory actions issued by federal agencies in 2019. The agency reviewed a total of 355 significant rules in 2018 and 237 significant rules in 2017.

As of January 3, 2020, OIRA’s website listed 132 regulatory actions under review.

OIRA is responsible for reviewing and coordinating what it deems to be all significant regulatory actions made by federal agencies, with the exception of independent federal agencies. Significant regulatory actions include agency rules that have had or may have a large impact on the economy, environment, public health, or state and local governments and communities. These regulatory actions may also conflict with other regulations or with the priorities of the president.

Every month, Ballotpedia compiles information about regulatory reviews conducted by OIRA. To view this project, click here.

Additional reading:
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs
Rulemaking 



Federal Register weekly update; first week since July with no new presidential documents

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

During the week of December 23 to December 27, the Federal Register increased by 1,342 pages, bringing the year-to-date total to 71,734 pages. The week’s Federal Register featured a total of 408 documents, including 323 notices, zero presidential documents, 50 proposed rules, and 35 final rules.

One final rule was deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that it could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules.

During the same week in 2018, the number of pages in the Federal Register increased by 1,600 pages for a year-to-date total of 67,676 pages. As of December 28, the 2019 total led the 2018 total by 4,058 pages.

The Trump administration has added an average of 1,380 pages to the Federal Register each week in 2019 as of December 28. Over the course of 2018, the Trump administration added an average of 1,301 pages to the Federal Register each week. During the Obama administration, the Federal Register increased by an average of 1,658 pages per week.

According to government data, the Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2018 and 2017.

Additional reading:
Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2016.


Federal Register weekly update; 2019 page total surpasses 70,000 pages

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity.

During the week of December 16 to December 20, the Federal Register increased by 2,068 pages, bringing the year-to-date total to 70,392 pages. The week’s Federal Register featured a total of 578 documents, including 447 notices, four presidential documents, 64 proposed rules, and 63 final rules.

Two proposed rules were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—meaning that they could have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules.

During the same week in 2018, the number of pages in the Federal Register increased by 1,644 pages for a year-to-date total of 66,076 pages. As of December 20, the 2019 total led the 2018 total by 4,316 pages.

The Trump administration has added an average of 1,380 pages to the Federal Register each week in 2019 as of December 20. Over the course of 2018, the Trump administration added an average of 1,301 pages to the Federal Register each week. During the Obama administration, the Federal Register increased by an average of 1,658 pages per week.

According to government data, the Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2018 and 2017.

Additional reading:
Click here to find yearly information about additions to the Federal Register from 1936 to 2016.



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