CategoryFederal

Two candidates running in the Nov. 8 general election for California’s 22nd Congressional District

California State Assemblymember Rudy Salas (D) and U.S. Rep. David Valadao (R) are running in the general election for California’s 22nd Congressional District on November 8, 2022. Heading into the election, the incumbent is Republican Connie Conway, who was first elected in a special election on June 7, 2022, to replace Devin Nunes. Conway chose not to run for a full term.

The Bakersfield Californian’s Sam Morgan has written, “Salas and Valadao have positioned themselves as independent-minded politicians in an effort to appeal to undecided and centrist voters.”

Salas is a member of the California State Assembly, a position to which he was first elected in 2011. Salas has run on his record in the Assembly, saying, “I’ve proven over the last decade that I’ve been able to deliver for Central Valley families. Whether that’s direct funding in million of dollars to expand nursing programs, bring new buildings, public safety, clean drinking water. There is a big difference between me and my opponents: I’ve been able to deliver on these things.” Salas has said he was the only Democrat to vote in 2017 against increasing the gasoline tax, saying, “I’m always going to do what I feel is right for Central Valley families, whether that a Democratic idea, a Republican idea, an independent idea.”

Valadao is a member of the U.S. House, representing the 21st Congressional District. Valadao represented the 21st Congressional District from 2013 to 2019. He lost in the 2018 general election but ran for his old seat in 2020 and won. Valadao said, “I’ll continue to be an independent member of Congress who will stand up to the divisive partisanship in Washington D.C., get things done to grow our local economy, and deliver more water for our farmers and communities.” Valadao has campaigned on protecting the Central Valley’s water supply and agricultural industry and ensuring veterans have “access to high quality healthcare, or education and employment opportunities here at home.” Valadao was one of 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach former President Donald Trump (R) for incitement of insurrection following the Jan. 6, 2021, breach of the U.S. Capitol.

California’s 22nd Congressional District boundaries changed following redistricting. According to Roll Call’s Kate Ackley, about 55% of the 22nd District’s population comes from the old 21st District, the district to which Valadao was elected in 2020. 



A closer look at Colorado’s new, competitive 8th Congressional District

Yadira Caraveo (D), Barbara Kirkmeyer (R), and three others are running in the general election for Colorado’s 8th Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

Caraveo is a pediatrician and a member of the Colorado House of Representatives, first elected in 2018. Caraveo, whose parents immigrated to the U.S. from Mexico, said, “Colorado families need a powerful partner fighting for them in Congress — not divisiveness and extremism. I am fighting so that our kids can achieve the same American Dream I was able to.”

Kirkmeyer is a member of the Colorado State Senate, first elected in 2020. Before entering the Senate, Kirkmeyer was a Weld County Commissioner from 1993 to 2000 and 2009 to 2020. Kirkmeyer said she will “lower the cost of living, restore order to the border, bring back energy independence, and stand up for law enforcement.”

The 8th District is one of seven new congressional districts created after the 2020 census and the first new congressional district in Colorado since 2001.

Bloomberg Government‘s Zach Cohen wrote, “The diversity and competitiveness of Colorado’s new 8th District has it primed to serve as a key House race in congressional this year and beyond.”

Twenty-eight percent of the district’s active registered voters are Democrats, 25% are Republicans, and 44% are unaffiliated.

Demographically, the 8th District has the state’s largest percentage of Hispanic or Latino residents, who make up 39% of the district’s population. Non-Hispanic white residents make up 52% of the district.

An analysis of eight statewide elections held between 2016 and 2020 found Democrats winning what is now the 8th District by an average of 1.3 percentage points.

At the presidential level specifically, Roll Call‘s Nathan Gonazlez reported that Donald Trump (R) won what is now the 8th District by two percentage points in 2016 and Joe Biden (D) won by four percentage points in 2020.

Richard Ward (L) and Steve Zorn (I) will also appear on the ballot, and Tim Long (I) is running as a write-in candidate.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. Democrats hold a 219-211 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Republicans need to gain a net of seven seats to win a majority in the chamber.



Federal Register weekly update: 579 documents added

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From August 29 through September 2, the Federal Register grew by 1,636 pages for a year-to-date total of 54,296 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 579 documents:

  • 475 notices
  • Three presidential documents
  • 27 proposed rules
  • 74 final rules

Four proposed rules, including a request for comments on how to update organic regulations on inert ingredients in pesticides from the Agricultural Marketing Service, and six final rules, including an alternative renewable identification number retirement schedule for small refineries under the Renewable Fuel Standard Program from the Environmental Protection Agency were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 148 significant proposed rules, 170 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of September 2.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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OIRA reviewed 46 significant rules in August

In August 2022, the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) reviewed 46 significant regulatory actions issued by federal agencies. OIRA approved two of these rules with no changes and approved the intent of 38 rules while recommending changes to their content. Six rules were withdrawn from the review process by the issuing agency.

OIRA reviewed 37 significant regulatory actions in August 2021, 64 significant regulatory actions in August 2020, 49 significant regulatory actions in August 2019, 35 significant regulatory actions in August 2018, and 12 significant regulatory actions in August 2017.

OIRA has reviewed a total of 305 significant rules in 2022. The agency reviewed a total of 502 significant rules in 2021, 676 significant rules in 2020, 475 significant rules in 2019, 355 significant rules in 2018, and 237 significant rules in 2017.

As of September 1, 2022, OIRA’s website listed 111 regulatory actions under review.

​​OIRA is responsible for reviewing and coordinating what it deems to be all significant regulatory actions made by federal agencies, with the exception of independent federal agencies. Significant regulatory actions include agency rules that have had or may have a large impact on the economy, environment, public health, or state and local governments and communities. These regulatory actions may also conflict with other regulations or with the priorities of the president.

Every month, Ballotpedia compiles information about regulatory reviews conducted by OIRA. To view this project, visit: https://ballotpedia.org/Completed_OIRA_review_of_federal_administrative_agency_rules.



President Joe Biden’s approval rating rises to 42%, highest since May

Image of the south facade of the White House.

Polling averages at the end of August showed President Joe Biden (D) at 42% approval, the highest rating he’s received since May. Fifty-four percent of voters disapprove of his performance.

Biden last had a 42% approval rating on May 19, 2022. The lowest approval rating he’s received is 38%, last seen on July 27, 2022. The highest approval rating Biden has received is 55%, last seen on May 26, 2021.

Congress was at 21% approval and 56% disapproval at the end of August. The highest approval rating Congress has received is 36%, last seen on July 16, 2021, and the lowest approval rating it has received is 14%, last seen on January 26, 2022.

At the same time in 2018, President Donald Trump’s (R) approval was one percentage point higher at 43%, and congressional approval was three points lower at 19%.

Ballotpedia’s polling index takes the average of polls conducted over the last thirty days to calculate presidential and congressional approval ratings. We average the results and show all polling results side-by-side because we believe that paints a clearer picture of public opinion than any individual poll can provide. The data is updated daily as new polling results are published.



Pat Ryan and Joe Sempolinsk win New York congressional special elections

Two special general elections were held for New York’s 19th and 23rd Congressional Districts on August 23, 2022. Pat Ryan (D) won the District 19 special election with 65,943 votes and defeated Marcus Molinaro (R). The special election was called after Antonio Delgado (D) left office to serve as the lieutenant governor of New York on May 25. Delgado served from 2019 to 2022.

Joe Sempolinski (R) won the District 23 special election with 38,749 votes and defeated Max Della Pia (D). The special election was called after Tom Reed (R) left office on May 10, after previously stating that he would not run for re-election. Reed served in Congress from 2010 to 2022. 

The filing deadline for both special elections passed on June 14. As of August 2022, 12 special elections have been held for the 117th Congress in 2021 and 2022. The U.S. House has 220 Democrats, 211 Republicans, and 4 vacancies. New York’s congressional delegation has 18 Democrats, 7 Republicans, and 2 vacancies. All 435 U.S. congressional seats are up for election on November 8. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats. 

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Murkowski, Tshibaka, Chesbro, and Kelley advance to the general election in Alaska’s U.S. Senate race

Nineteen candidates ran in the top-four Senate primary in Alaska on August 16, 2022. Incumbent Lisa Murkowski (R), Kelly Tshibaka (R), Patricia Chesbro (D), and Buzz Kelley (R) advanced to the general election.

This was the first time the top-four primary was used in a Senate race since Alaska voters approved the concept in 2020. Under this system, all candidates, regardless of party affiliation, run in a single primary election. The four candidates who receive the most votes advance to the general election, where the winner is decided using ranked-choice voting.

The 19 candidates included eight Republicans, three Democrats, one Libertarian, five independents, and two Alaskan Independence Party candidates.

FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver wrote it was likely at least two Republican candidates and a Democratic one would advance to the general election.

Murkowski, the incumbent since 2002, had the endorsements of U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R), fellow Alaska U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan (R), and Sens. Joe Manchin (D) and Kyrsten Sinema (D).

Tshibaka, a former commissioner at the Alaska Department of Administration had the endorsements of former President Donald Trump (R) and the Alaska Republican Party.

Chesbro is an educator from Palmer, and Kelley is a retired mechanic from Wasilla.

Three election forecasters rate the general election Solid or Safe Republican.

Murkowski’s father, Frank Murkowski (R), was Senator from 1980 to 2002, when he resigned to become governor of Alaska. After taking office, the elder Murkowski appointed his daughter to the U.S. Senate seat. In 2010, after losing the Republican nomination, Lisa Murkowski successfully ran for re-election as a write-in candidate. As of 2022, she was one of two U.S. Senators, alongside South Carolina’s Strom Thurmond in 1954, to have been elected as a write-in candidate.



Federal Register weekly update: More than 300 significant documents issued so far in 2022

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From August 22 through August 26, the Federal Register grew by 1,424 pages for a year-to-date total of 52,660 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 525 documents:

  • 412 notices
  • Two presidential documents
  • 25 proposed rules
  • 86 final rules

Six proposed rules, including amendments to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations regarding VA health care professionals practicing telehealth from the Veterans Affairs Department, and eight final rules, including an amendment to the Federal Management Regulation (FMR) regarding physical security standards at federally owned and leased facilities and areas from the General Services Administration were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 144 significant proposed rules, 164 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of August 26.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

Click here to find more information about weekly additions to the Federal Register in 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017: https://ballotpedia.org/Changes_to_the_Federal_Register 

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New York sees seven open U.S. House seats, a decade-high

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in New York this year was June 10, 2022. One hundred and six candidates are running for New York’s 26 U.S. House districts, including 67 Democrats and 39 Republicans. That’s 4.08 candidates per district, more than the four candidates per district in 2020 and the 3.15 in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census, which resulted in New York losing one U.S. House district. 
  • The 106 candidates running this year are two fewer than the 108 who ran in 2020 and 21 more than the 85 who ran in 2018. Seventy-seven candidates ran in 2016, 55 in 2014, and 81 in 2012.

  • Four incumbents are running in districts other than the ones they currently represent. Rep. Claudia Tenney (R), who represents the 22nd district, is running in the 24th this year. Rep. Sean Maloney (D), who represents the 18th district, is running in the 17th, and Rep. Mondaire Jones (D), the incumbent in the 17th, is running in the 10th.
  • Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D), who represents the 10th district, is running in the 12th this year. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D), the incumbent in the 12th district, is running for re-election, making the 12th the only New York district this year where two incumbents are running against each other. 
  • Five incumbents—two Democrats and three Republicans—are not running for re-election this year. 
  • Rep. Lee Zeldin (R), who represents the 1st district, and Rep. Tom Suozzi (D), who represents the 3rd district, filed to run for governor. 
  • Rep. John Katko (R), who represents the 24th district, and Rep. Kathleen Rice (D), who represents the 4th district, are retiring. 
  • Rep. Christopher Jacobs (R), who represents the 27th district, is also retiring. The 27th district will be eliminated after this cycle due to redistricting. 
  • There are seven open seats this year, a decade-high. That number is up from four in 2020, and from one in 2018. There were four open seats in 2016 and two each in 2014 and 2012.

  • The open seats include Zeldin’s 1st district, Suozzi’s 3rd, Rice’s 4th, Maloney’s 18th, and Tenney’s 22nd. Additionally, the 19th and the 23rd districts are currently vacant. 
  • Rep. Antonio Delgado (D), who represented the 19th, was appointed lieutenant governor of New York, and Rep. Tom Reed (R), who represented the 23rd, resigned after a sexual misconduct allegation. Special elections will be held on August 23 to fill both seats.
  • Fourteen candidates are running to replace Nadler in the 10th district, the most candidates running for a seat this year. One of the candidates, former New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (D), unofficially withdrew from the race, but his name will appear on the ballot.
  • There are 16 contested Democratic primaries this year, the same number as in 2020, and three more than in 2018, when there were 13. There were 10 contested Democratic primaries in 2016, five in 2014, and 10 in 2012. 
  • There are eight contested Republican primaries. That’s one more than in 2020, when there were seven contested Republican primaries, and seven more than in 2018, when there was one. There were three contested Republican primaries in 2016, five in 2014, and five in 2012. 

  • Seven incumbents are not facing any primary challengers this year. 
  • One seat—the 5th— is guaranteed to Democrats because no Republicans filed. No seats are guaranteed to Republicans because no Democrats filed. 

New York and Florida are holding their congressional primaries on August 23, 2022. In New York, the winner of a primary election is the candidate who receives the greatest number of votes, even if he or she does not win more than 50 percent of votes cast.

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Federal Register weekly update: Tops 50,000 pages

Image of the south facade of the White House.

The Federal Register is a daily journal of federal government activity that includes presidential documents, proposed and final rules, and public notices. It is a common measure of an administration’s regulatory activity, accounting for both regulatory and deregulatory actions.

From August 15 through August 19, the Federal Register grew by 1,262 pages for a year-to-date total of 51,236 pages.

The Federal Register hit an all-time high of 95,894 pages in 2016.

This week’s Federal Register featured the following 528 documents:

  1. 427 notices
  2. Four presidential documents
  3. 33 proposed rules
  4. 64 final rules

Four proposed rules, including the 2023-2024 multifamily housing goals for the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac enterprises from the Federal Housing Finance Agency, and five final rules, including the establishment of over-the-counter hearing aids from the Food and Drug Administration were deemed significant under E.O. 12866—defined by the potential to have large impacts on the economy, environment, public health, or state or local governments. Significant actions may also conflict with presidential priorities or other agency rules. The Biden administration has issued 138 significant proposed rules, 156 significant final rules, and one significant notice as of August 19.

Ballotpedia maintains page counts and other information about the Federal Register as part of its Administrative State Project. The project is a neutral, nonpartisan encyclopedic resource that defines and analyzes the administrative state, including its philosophical origins, legal and judicial precedents, and scholarly examinations of its consequences. The project also monitors and reports on measures of federal government activity.

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